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-   -   Changing from Electrical Cook Top to Electrical Range (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/changing-electrical-cook-top-electrical-range-73980/)

EkS 06-17-2010 02:13 PM

Changing from Electrical Cook Top to Electrical Range
 
Hey guys, just bought a house and it has an electrical cook top and an electrical oven that are old and really dirty. I'm redoing the whole kitchen, and I want to switch to an electrical range. I know that the electrical ranges have a power cord and the cook tops don't.

I can see the wires coming out of the wall. The wires are in a metal conduit (if that's the right term) into a junction box. Then from the cook top to the junction box where they make the connection. The same goes for the electrical oven.

My question is what do I need to do to get and electrical outlet for the range? The house was built in 1944 so I think that I only have neutral and no ground. So would I have to use a 3 prong outlet or 4 prong outlet?

Yoyizit 06-17-2010 02:20 PM

You should check the wire size. #10 is 0.1" in diameter, #8 is thicker.

EkS 06-17-2010 02:30 PM

Yep, I can check the wire size with my calipers. But what would that determine?

Yoyizit 06-17-2010 02:32 PM

It will see if it can handle the current that will be pulled by your appliance.

Turn off the breaker first and make sure you are only measuring the metal conductor and not the outside of the insulation.

EkS 06-17-2010 02:35 PM

If there's already the cook top and the oven, shouldn't it mean that it could handle the load. I do know that it's on it's own breaker.

LyonsElecSupply 06-17-2010 02:43 PM

Youll probably need #6 CU with a 50a service to the range. Youll need 6/3 NMB with Ground if you rewire it.


Edit, youll need a 4 wire outlet for new construction and installations.

EkS 06-17-2010 02:49 PM

So the older 3 wire outlets are no longer sold? If they're not sold, I have to rewire it?

LyonsElecSupply 06-17-2010 03:00 PM

They are sold. But since its a new installation, i believe youll need 4 wire..New installations require separate neutrals and grounds for services and appliances. They used to be interchageable terms but now that is not the case.....that and if your wire is too small you have to replace anyways so might as well get 4 wire.

Your manufacturer warranty may be void also if you use 3 wire.....
Im sure this is the case with dryers now.

Speedy Petey 06-17-2010 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EkS (Post 457706)
If there's already the cook top and the oven, shouldn't it mean that it could handle the load. I do know that it's on it's own breaker.

If they are separate then you have two appliances being combined into one. This would obviously require one larger circuit as opposed to two smaller ones.

A household cooking appliance rated at 12kW or less can be used on a 40A circuit. Typically this is wired with #8cu. 8/3NM would be standard issue for this 120/240v circuit.
You can also run a 50A circuit with 6/3NM if you like.


Quote:

Originally Posted by LyonsElecSupply (Post 457724)
Your manufacturer warranty may be void also if you use 3 wire.....
Im sure this is the case with dryers now.

Not at all. ANY new appliance can be used in an old setting, even if it is an older 3-wire 120/240v circuit without a dedicated ground.

Yoyizit 06-17-2010 03:09 PM

#6 dia. is 162 mils.

LyonsElecSupply 06-17-2010 03:15 PM

"A household cooking appliance rated at 12kW or less can be used on a 40A circuit. "

12kw is 50a.............9.6kw is 40.....

if it were me in your situation id run 6/3nmb with ground, put a 4 wire in.

And from what i understand you have to have a 4 wire with a new dryer now......this coming from a few sources here.....but from what i heard its manufacturer based.

EkS 06-17-2010 03:17 PM

Wow, I'm getting confused now.

What are the steps that I need to take for this?

Yoyizit 06-17-2010 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EkS (Post 457736)
Wow, I'm getting confused now.

What are the steps that I need to take for this?

Get the nameplate data for your new appliance.

Speedy Petey 06-17-2010 03:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LyonsElecSupply (Post 457734)

12kw is 50a.............9.6kw is 40.....

Yes it is. What is your point?

A 12kW range most definitely CAN be on a 40A circuit. See NEC 220.14(B) and 220.55
The maximum demand for a 12kW range is 8kW.

Why run #6 when #8 will do the same job?



Quote:

Originally Posted by LyonsElecSupply (Post 457734)
And from what i understand you have to have a 4 wire with a new dryer now......this coming from a few sources here.....but from what i heard its manufacturer based.

If you read or saw this for yourself I would not doubt you, but what you heard was wrong.
The appliance is not the issue. It is the circuit. I have NEVER heard of a manufacturer requiring one or the other. In fact, pretty much every dryer and range I have ever wired has been factory wired for 3-wire, and you have to remove the ground to neutral bond to use on 4-wire circuits.

EkS 06-17-2010 03:36 PM

Here is a link to the manual. I checked the electrical connection and it gives you both.

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdf...aa26ff688a.pdf

Also, my dryer is going to be gas, so that plays no part.


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