Change Heater Plug - Electrical - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-20-2012, 07:05 PM   #16
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Change heater plug


Thanks to you all. I'm convinced not to take the risk.
It just never occurred to me that a light bulb or clock radio would be built that heavily (20 amps).
Thanks again.
Dave

Advertisement

davenk32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 07:10 PM   #17
TTW
Member
 
TTW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Maine
Posts: 350
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Change heater plug


Those small load doohickes are UL listed to be safely connected to a 20 amp circuit.

Could you imagine if we had different plugs and circuits for 5, 10, 15, and 20 amp widgets?
__________________
#1 - If you don't know what you're doing - get a licensed electrician!
#2 - If you follow my advice and something bad happens see # 1
Electricity bites hard, and it could be the last thing you feel... Good Luck!
TTW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 08:30 PM   #18
Member
 
Missouri Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Almost Arkansas
Posts: 2,764
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Change heater plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by davenk32 View Post
Got it. Thanks. How about if I replace the cord and the plug?
__________________
Do you want it your way or the right way?
Missouri Bound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2012, 10:41 PM   #19
Licensed Electrician
 
k_buz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: SE Wisconsin
Posts: 4,343
Rewards Points: 2,006
Default

Change heater plug


The heater was designed, listed, and spec'ed to utilize a 30A circuit, the cord and the cord end that came factory installed. Manufacturer specs over-ride the NEC, thus, changing the cord, the cord end, or plugging this into anything other than a 30A circuit, is against code.
__________________
__________________________________________________ ______________
Answers based on the National Electric Code. Always check local amendments.


k_buz is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to k_buz For This Useful Post:
frenchelectrican (12-20-2012)
Old 12-21-2012, 08:36 AM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,497
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Change heater plug


I once saw the results of someone switching a plug on one of those large computer room computers. They did this because an appropriate outlet was not available. They also miswired the plug connecting hot to ground and thus wrecking about $40,000.00 worth of computer equipment.

Note this company had their own in-house electrician and the person could have easily called to have the proper outlet installed. (The person who did this no longer works there.)

Bottom line: Various plugs are on equipment for a reason. Call an electrician and have the proper outlet/circuit installed. It might just be the least expensive route to go! (Not only wrecked equipment, but fire or electrocution possible as well.)
Billy_Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 09:34 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,976
Rewards Points: 2,048
Default

Change heater plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_Bob View Post
I once saw the results of someone switching a plug on one of those large computer room computers. They did this because an appropriate outlet was not available. They also miswired the plug connecting hot to ground and thus wrecking about $40,000.00 worth of computer equipment.

Note this company had their own in-house electrician and the person could have easily called to have the proper outlet installed. (The person who did this no longer works there.)

Bottom line: Various plugs are on equipment for a reason. Call an electrician and have the proper outlet/circuit installed. It might just be the least expensive route to go! (Not only wrecked equipment, but fire or electrocution possible as well.)
Incidentally, this is an instance of a mistake made while assembling/rewiring equipment, as opposed to powering equipment without providing proper overcurrent protection. The equipment was damaged immediately when powered on.

In the OPs case, the heater would operate properly on its new circuit. Only if something went wrong with the heater would the bad consequences of using the larger amperage circuit show up.

Advertisement

__________________
Forget super sized fries. The Washington Redskins could promote healthy eating with First Lady Obama by choosing a (red skinned) turnip for a mascot.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water Heater Constantly Failing/Replaced DroidGuard12 HVAC 6 04-11-2012 04:41 PM
Rotten heater anode rod EdLank Plumbing 6 03-21-2012 12:54 PM
80 Gallon Water Heater Thermostat myowneq Electrical 26 02-13-2012 11:50 AM
Change an American plug to Bristish? Grandmom Appliances 2 12-14-2009 01:23 PM
Glasshouse heater plug melting stuie Electrical 7 04-21-2009 11:54 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts