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Old 01-22-2011, 04:33 AM   #16
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Can Romex and a gas line share the same run?


You have never seen one of those old screw in receptacle adapters in a light socket. We have a hardware store in town where you can still buy those adapters and cut off the ground prong and plug in your air conditioner.

I have worked on rentals for 35 years. I have seen some crazy stuff.
Old dairy and horse barns. Old tractor sheds with bare wires twisted together and exposed next to a door.

I won't get into what I saw when I was a volunteer fire fighter.

This old house I live in "had" a shared neutral ( installed by a licensed electrician) in the kitchen that was installed in 1998.

Shared neutrals sound good in theory but I won't do it. I have done the math, and seen how it really works.
With a 15 amp #14 shared neutral you have the potential of putting a 90 amp short on 1 #14 wire.
I don't like shared neutrals.

I don't like any aluminum wire either. If the money is there I will use copper. I prefer to put the service underground also.
My side of the meter is MY work.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
I know we are getting off topic here, but this is completely false and makes absolutely NO sense.

WHAT "overload condition" are you referring to??


Last edited by Hourglass52; 01-22-2011 at 05:26 AM.
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Old 01-22-2011, 04:50 AM   #17
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Can Romex and a gas line share the same run?


Errr I'm still confused. Of course any homeowner can do all sorts of wacky stuff to put to much load (amperage) on a circuit. A properly installed breaker kinda mitigates the danger of this though right?

You had this shared neutral in your kitchen...I'm curious why you changed it. Were YOU overloading one of the legs on the shared circuit? Did you think having separate neutrals was going to solve this problem? What sort of situation can you envision where separate neutrals could cause some sort of fire hazard in a residential situation based on current codes when properly installed?

I understand if a circuit is being serviced while energized and the neutral is broken bad stuff could happen...but current code prevents that from happening.

Are you saying that the millions of residential shared neutral circuits currently installed in residences and the ka-frikkin-jillions installed in commercial buildings only just "sound good in theory"?

And again let me say that after 12 years as a resi electrician (new construction, re-modeling, and EXTENSIVE service experience) and 5 years commercial experience I have been out of it for a few years due to the economy. So maybe I'm missing something here....

Like I stated earlier, I'm just confused...
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:00 AM   #18
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Can Romex and a gas line share the same run?


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Originally Posted by Hourglass52 View Post

Shared neutrals sound good in theory but I won't do it. I have done the math, and seen how it really works.
With a 15 amp #14 shared neutral you have the potential of putting a 90 amp short on 1 #14 wire.
HUH???
I'm sorry. All this tells me is that you have no idea what you are talking about.

Are you aware that the service entering your home is simply one big "shared neutral" circuit?
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:24 AM   #19
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Can Romex and a gas line share the same run?


Do you realize it takes as much as 3 times the current value of a breaker to trip it???

I said on MY side of the meter !!
Can you read.

I work under 3 masters and 2 inspectors. Lets drop this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
HUH???
I'm sorry. All this tells me is that you have no idea what you are talking about.

Are you aware that the service entering your home is simply one big "shared neutral" circuit?

Last edited by Hourglass52; 01-22-2011 at 07:29 AM.
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:49 AM   #20
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Can Romex and a gas line share the same run?


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Do you realize it takes as much as 3 times the current value of a breaker to trip it???
Once again. No clue.
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:50 AM   #21
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Can Romex and a gas line share the same run?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hourglass52 View Post
I have done the math, and seen how it really works.
With a 15 amp #14 shared neutral you have the potential of putting a 90 amp short on 1 #14 wire.
I don't like shared neutrals.
I guess a few years off has proven I'm rusty in the use of Ohm's law too. Would you please school me on how you came up with these figures?

No one is disputing your right to wire any way you see fit on your side of the meter...however this is a do-it-yourself site and many homeowners may be mislead into believing you know what you are talking about. Which you clearly don't.

Stating you work under 3 Master Electricians and two Inspectors is irrevelant.

Just because a Master Electrician states that something is true in the world of electrical theory doesn't make it true if it is not in fact true.

Aluminium conductors are just fine when installed in a code compliant way.
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Old 01-22-2011, 08:51 AM   #22
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Can Romex and a gas line share the same run?


Lets do some math just for fun. Y'all chime in if i screw this up.

I=Amps ?
E=Volts 120
R=Resistance .03ohms (10 foot of #14AWG)

How much amperage would be on this wire if I had a short circuit? (please be gentle when mentioning all the other factors involved here...this is just for simpicities sake)

Ohm's law states E/R=I
120/.03=4000A

Is 4000 plus amps bad to have on a 14awg wire? Well sure BUT it is what trips the breaker so quick.

Not sure where the 90A number came from Not sure where a shared neutral has anything to do with a short circuit either.

Ohm's Law isn't Ohm's theory....It's Ohm's Law. Everytime.

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