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-   -   Can I use a simple on/off switch? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/can-i-use-simple-off-switch-143333/)

R083RT 05-10-2012 12:23 PM

Can I use a simple on/off switch?
 
I have a dimmer switch at by work that recently broke. The switch itself broke and I glued it back but it's not a good fix. I will have to replace it this week with a new switch. The dimmer switch that's on there currently is an Lutron Nova N-2000 ($120)

There are about 20 LED bulbs on the circuit and the dimmer feature doesn't work, since they are LEDs they flicker instead of dimming. We don't need the dimmer feature anyways.

Basically I am thinking of getting a simple on and off switch without the dimmer feature for a couple bucks at the store but just not sure if that's compatible. Do I really need to replace it with another Lutron $120 switch? Or will something basic do the job?

Code05 05-10-2012 12:35 PM

Yes, that will work for your application.

joed 05-10-2012 02:07 PM

Just be sure of the voltage. You said at work, Common commercial building lighting volts are 277 volts or 347 in Canada.

Code05 05-10-2012 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joed (Post 918644)
Just be sure of the voltage. You said at work, Common commercial building lighting volts are 277 volts or 347 in Canada.

Most of ours are 277V. I wonder why we do not use that much 347V.

ddawg16 05-10-2012 02:43 PM

Yes...a switch will work....but it might work even better if you use the right dimmer.

The N2000 is for incandescent lamps only....it most likley uses a chopper to reduce the light...basically the chopper is a semiconductor that turns on proportionally for the duration of a power cycle. Inexpensive and reliable....you don't see the flicker in incandescent or halogen bulbs because the filament can not respond that fast....

Different story with LED's. You have to electrically reduce the voltage to the lamps....

The proper dimmer would be NF10 according to the web site. That is assuming your using 120vac lamps. If you were not using 120vac lamps, we would not be having this conversation because all of your lamps would be burned out.

andrew79 05-10-2012 06:57 PM

if they were originally incandecants then it'll be a 120V switch, has to be commercial grade though so the 50 cent cheapo at HD isn't going to work.

some of downtown toronto is 277V, mostly the older buildings.Also alot of buildings in alberta are u.s voltage too. I'm sure at some point in trade school they told us why we use 347/600 instead of 277/480 but that's way too far back to remember.

I can't see it just beeing a simple fact of being able to downsize wire a bit and put more lights on a circuit. Voltage drop improves as well.

joed 05-10-2012 11:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Code05 (Post 918671)
Most of ours are 277V. I wonder why we do not use that much 347V.

Much of the USA industrial three phase voltage is 480. That derives to 277 per phase.
In Canada we more often use 600 volt systems. That derives to 347 per phase.


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