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-   -   Can I bury an ethernet cable in a wall? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/can-i-bury-ethernet-cable-wall-173104/)

gtothek 02-27-2013 08:14 AM

Can I bury an ethernet cable in a wall?
 
I have an unsightly coax/ethernet combo wall plate, in which the ethernet cable is connected into the wall plate. I've just put up beadboard wainscoting in my child's nursery and want to get rid of the ugly faded wall plate. I have no futher need for the ethernet cable b/c my whole house is wireless. Can I just cut the ethernet cable and tape and cap it and bury it in the wall? It's low voltage right? I appreciate the help!

Speedy Petey 02-27-2013 08:27 AM

That's not a problem.

TheBobmanNH 02-27-2013 08:57 AM

Why not disconnect the other end too, just for good measure? Not because of any electrical worry, but ... I dunno, why have a big antenna coming off your router when you don't need to?

gtothek 02-27-2013 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheBobmanNH (Post 1125944)
Why not disconnect the other end too, just for good measure? Not because of any electrical worry, but ... I dunno, why have a big antenna coming off your router when you don't need to?

The ethernet cable is running up 2 floors from my basement. I don't have the patience or know how to snake it all the way out. I'm not sure what you mean by big antenna off the router.

TheBobmanNH 02-27-2013 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gtothek (Post 1126026)
The ethernet cable is running up 2 floors from my basement. I don't have the patience or know how to snake it all the way out. I'm not sure what you mean by big antenna off the router.

Wasn't saying to pull it out of the wall, just to disconnect the other end from the router.

Cicatrix 02-27-2013 11:35 AM

antennae
 
in terms of signal propagation, the cut end of a cable that is still connected to active equipment, the line becomes an antenna broadcasting all signals sent thru the router. while you may think this is in itself convenient it posses security concerns (that likely wouldn't affect a typical household) and may produce electromagnetic interference with other radio frequency devices like baby monitors in some cases. cutting both ends is best and tag each to indicate the location of the other end, ie. at the router end label the cut end as 'baby's room' and in the baby's room label it as 'to router'. in the future this may be reused by the next tenant of the house or perhaps your child if a wired connection is ever required (wired is still the most stable and reliable).

hyunelan2 02-27-2013 11:46 AM

Slightly off-topic, wired is way-faster than wireless too. Great wireless right now is 150Mbps. Wired is over 1000Mbps. Like Cicatrix said, you may want to hook that back up in the future for some application that wireless just doesn't have the bandwidth to do well (1080p video streaming, for example). I'd just neatly tuck it into the wall and remember where it is, then unhook the other end from the router and keep it there for a future date. It won't hurt anything just sitting in the wall unhooked.

gtothek 02-27-2013 12:31 PM

The other end of the ethernet cable in my basement is not connected. The previous homeowner had every room in the house hardwired and plugged into a hub in the basement. I just unplugged the hub and have the whole house running wireless. I will leave the cut ethernet cable buried in the wall, if I ever need to use it in the future.

TheBobmanNH 02-27-2013 01:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gtothek (Post 1126116)
The other end of the ethernet cable in my basement is not connected. The previous homeowner had every room in the house hardwired and plugged into a hub in the basement. I just unplugged the hub and have the whole house running wireless. I will leave the cut ethernet cable buried in the wall, if I ever need to use it in the future.

Kind of funny that you were worried about it being "low-voltage" then. if neither end is hooked up, it's no voltage. :laughing:

gtothek 02-27-2013 01:36 PM

Haha I kind of came to that realization while reading the replies on this post! D'oh!:whistling2:

gregzoll 02-27-2013 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cicatrix (Post 1126064)
in terms of signal propagation, the cut end of a cable that is still connected to active equipment, the line becomes an antenna broadcasting all signals sent thru the router. while you may think this is in itself convenient it posses security concerns (that likely wouldn't affect a typical household) and may produce electromagnetic interference with other radio frequency devices like baby monitors in some cases. cutting both ends is best and tag each to indicate the location of the other end, ie. at the router end label the cut end as 'baby's room' and in the baby's room label it as 'to router'. in the future this may be reused by the next tenant of the house or perhaps your child if a wired connection is ever required (wired is still the most stable and reliable).

Never going to happen in a million years with ethernet cabling. Now of course, in most places, you would use a patch panel and just disconnect the patch cord to the unused jack, but other times, you leave it alone, and nothing happens with the cable being always connected to the switch, which would then be connected to a router, then to a firewall, then to a modem.

This is the funniest thing I have ever heard in my life, of dealing with networking & computers in over 35 years.

mpoulton 02-27-2013 07:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cicatrix (Post 1126064)
in terms of signal propagation, the cut end of a cable that is still connected to active equipment, the line becomes an antenna broadcasting all signals sent thru the router.

I disagree with that. The unterminated end is certainly an impedance mismatch and will cause high SWR at the driving end (which is not harmful in any way for an ethernet port). However, it is still a twisted pair cable with differential signaling. There should be no more radiation from the cable than if it were properly terminated. This is not like coax or ladder-line, which can radiate if not terminated properly.

vsheetz 02-27-2013 07:15 PM

If you leave it connected to the router and just cut off the other end, all the bits will fall out of the router through the open cable end. :eek:

To prevent this, just tie a knot in the end of the cable where you cut it off. :thumbup:

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: :thumbsup:

gregzoll 02-27-2013 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vsheetz (Post 1126391)
If you leave it connected to the router and just cut off the other end, all the bits will fall out of the router through the open cable end. :eek:

To prevent this, just tie a knot in the end of the cable where you cut it off. :thumbup:

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Or place the end into a bucket and when it gets full, empty it out.


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