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J S Machine 04-27-2011 07:28 AM

Can this be done?
 
I'm going to get my shop wired soon and I'm trying to figure out exactly how everything will be done. I will have a panel with breakers controlling a few circuits. On one particular circuit, I have something I am not sure about.

1.) I have the panel.
2.) I have a single pole switch
3.) I have a light fixture overhead
4. ) I have one lonesome receptacle

To avoid having to run the receptacle on it's own breaker and a dedicated circuit, I would like to have it tied in with the light circuit. Problem is, I can't figure out how to do it.

I know this would be very easy to do if the source was coming from the receptacle side, but it is coming from the switch side.

I drew up this diagram to help explain what I am talking about-

http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/d...ch_circuit.jpg

I know I could simply run wiring all the way to the receptacle, and then back to the switch and light, but I'm trying to avoid wasting a bunch of wire if possible. The receptacle is way over on the end of the wall, so to do this would require about three times the wire I'll have to use if the way I'm thinking is possible. I'll have it done that way if that is the only option, but this is my idea:

Run wire from panel to switch. Branch off from the switch to the receptacle, as well as branch off from the switch to the light. The switch controls the light and the receptacle or the receptacle can remain hot at all times..doesn't really matter as long as the switch controls the light.

Is this possible or am I just wishful thinking?

a7ecorsair 04-27-2011 07:58 AM

Bring the cable into the switch box and connect the three whites together, the grounds together, and connect the black to the source black along with a pigtail to the switch.

Jim Port 04-27-2011 08:04 AM

You could do the receptacle at the end of the run and it would be switch controlled. You could run 3 wire + ground cable from the switch to the light and then two wire to the receptacle and the receptacle would be hot all the time.

J S Machine 04-27-2011 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 637454)
You could do the receptacle at the end of the run and it would be switch controlled. You could run 3 wire + ground cable from the switch to the light and then two wire to the receptacle and the receptacle would be hot all the time.

I'm trying to avoid doing it in one run if at all possible. The leng the thewire will have to travel is pretty extensive, and that is the reason I was wondering if it could be done the way I was proposing. If I come off of the switch twice, one run going to the light and the other run going to the receptacle, I can save alot of wire.

Is it possible to do that?

daveb1 04-27-2011 08:37 AM

If you want half your receptacle switched with the light and the other half hot all the time could you not just run a 3 wire plus ground from the switch to the receptacle?

J S Machine 04-27-2011 08:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a7ecorsair (Post 637449)
Bring the cable into the switch box and connect the three whites together, the grounds together, and connect the black to the source black along with a pigtail to the switch.

Is this what you mean?

http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/d...h_circuit2.jpg

a7ecorsair 04-27-2011 08:42 AM

A+:thumbup:

J S Machine 04-27-2011 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a7ecorsair (Post 637474)
A+:thumbup:

So an electrician would do this?

Is it code?

Also, with this setup is the receptacle switched or does it remain hot?

Jim Port 04-27-2011 08:49 AM

In the last diagram the receptacle would be hot all the time. It is commonly done.

a7ecorsair 04-27-2011 08:53 AM

I assume this is #12 so you will need a 22 cu in box and all the wiring has to be in #12 if it is on a 20 amp breaker. The receptacle will be 100% hot. Code allows lights and receptacle on the same circuit, but the receptacle will have be GFCI.

J S Machine 04-27-2011 08:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 637483)
In the last diagram the receptacle would be hot all the time. It is commonly done.

Ok guys, thanks. I'll ask that it be done this way. That plug is over by the garage door, and the only one on that wall.

I really didn't want to have to run a dedicated circuit to it, so this is good.

a7ecorsair 04-27-2011 09:01 AM

You could put a double gang box in for a switch and a receptacle and then run the wire across the garage.

J S Machine 04-27-2011 12:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a7ecorsair (Post 637488)
I assume this is #12 so you will need a 22 cu in box and all the wiring has to be in #12 if it is on a 20 amp breaker. The receptacle will be 100% hot. Code allows lights and receptacle on the same circuit, but the receptacle will have be GFCI.

Not sure what cu my box is for that receptacle or the switch. I figure I will need a little larger one for the switch because of all the wire nuts. It is 12/2 wire..Everything I have is 20amp, switch, receptacles..

Why do I need a GFCI receptacle there? Doesn't that require 12/3 wire?

a7ecorsair 04-27-2011 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J S Machine (Post 637627)

Why do I need a GFCI receptacle there? Doesn't that require 12/3 wire?

No, 12-2. Garages and accessory building require GFCI.

J S Machine 04-27-2011 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a7ecorsair (Post 637664)
No, 12-2. Garages and accessory building require GFCI.

I have a total of five plugs. Do they all need to be GFCI?


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