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-   -   Brighter Bulbs? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/brighter-bulbs-158047/)

secutanudu 09-26-2012 09:39 AM

Brighter Bulbs?
 
Just installed a new ceiling fan for my brother. It has standard sockets for three 60w bulbs. It just doesnt put out enough light.

What would you guys recommend replacing those bulbs with that would give more light, and not be gross ugly light :)

Halogen? Fluorescent? LED?

Not sure which is the brightest, and which is closest to incandescent. Thanks!

AltaSparky 09-26-2012 09:47 AM

Cfl's would work. That is probably the easiest thing you can do without changing the fixture. You can buy lamps that are slightly different colors. 3000k is more yellow and 5000 is more blue.

Dave632 09-26-2012 10:07 AM

The power consumption of a light is measured in watts, the amount of light it emits in lumens, the color of the light in degrees Kelvin. What you want is a light that gives more lumens without exceeding the 60W rating of the socket.

I happen to have a box of "75Watt-equivalent" CFLs. They consume only 20 watts. So, if such a light exists, you could use something around a 225w-equivalent CFL (3 x 75) and still consume only 60W.

Initially, CFLs were mostly "bare bulbs", and many people didn't like the "cool" color they produced. As incandescents are phased out, the selection and design of CFLs has improved and warmer ones are now available.

I suggest you go to a WM, big box store, or a lighting store and see what's available. Personally, I find halogen light a bit harsh for indoor use, and I think you'll find that LEDs are still pretty pricey, especially if the fan lights will be used only occasionally. You might want to buy one each of several different designs, and see which one looks best. You can always use the other ones in a closet or the garage.

secutanudu 09-26-2012 10:16 AM

I should have also mentioned that the fixture uses candelabra sockets and has a dimmer. That will limit my options severely. I know there are socket converters (candelabra-->medium base) but i am not sure if a bigger bulb will fit inside the fixture.

So I'd have to use LED, Halogen, or dimmable CFL.

patented 09-26-2012 01:06 PM

If you can stomach the price, LED bulbs put out a LOT of light per watt. My 7W LED bulbs easily put out as much as a 60W incandescent.

Oso954 09-26-2012 02:23 PM

Do not use Halogen (or Xenon) without checking with the Mfg. While they put out more lumens, they also generate a lot more heat. When the Mfg. says 60 watts, they are usually talking incandescent, not halogen.
Halogen bulbs in a fan that was not designed for them is a fire hazard.

LED's and CFL's in a candelabra base are designed as replacements for the incandescent. They often yield less lumens (light) than the incandescent.

"A" shape bulbs (standard shape) will often have a higher lumen rating than the "B" shape (flame shape) bulbs. "A" shape may also direct a little more downwards compared to a "B", depending on the filament size/layout of the two bulbs.

If you have a lamp with a candelabra socket, I would check the output of a 60 watt bulb in it, against the bulbs in the fan. That will eliminate bad dimmer or bad wattage limiter from the problem. (Do the lights come on bright and then dim down within seconds ?)

If 180 watts is not enough light, how big is this room ?

operagost 09-26-2012 03:43 PM

Halogen bulbs don't actually put out any more heat. If they did, they would be putting out less light-- the law of conservation of energy applies here. However, their SURFACE TEMPERATURE is higher because the surface area is smaller and the filament is closer to the glass. Therefore, the advice to check on their safety on a particular application is warranted, since the concentrated heat might cause a shade to melt or catch on fire.

Oso954 09-26-2012 05:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by operagost (Post 1017950)
Halogen bulbs don't actually put out any more heat. If they did, they would be putting out less light-- the law of conservation of energy applies here.

Maybe you can tell me how much of the light of an incandescent bulb falls outside the viable range of humans, and then compare that to a halogen bulb.

The filament of a halogen bulb runs at higher temps than an incandescent. For most laymen, higher temperature is expressed as more heat.

While there are a lot of other factors that come into play, put a halogen bulb in a closed top fixture that was not designed with halogen in mind, and the fixture will run hotter with the halogen bulb than with the incandescent.

dmxtothemax 09-26-2012 07:59 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by secutanudu (Post 1017731)
Just installed a new ceiling fan for my brother. It has standard sockets for three 60w bulbs. It just doesnt put out enough light.

What would you guys recommend replacing those bulbs with that would give more light, and not be gross ugly light :)

Halogen? Fluorescent? LED?

Not sure which is the brightest, and which is closest to incandescent. Thanks!

I think you are looking for warm white lamps !
I would go for warm white CFL lamps,
and yes they do make them with the smaller ES bases.
E14 is the base size !

Attachment 58020

They might not be commonly available but they are available.


Attachment 58021

mpoulton 09-26-2012 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Oso954 (Post 1018008)
Maybe you can tell me how much of the light of an incandescent bulb falls outside the viable range of humans, and then compare that to a halogen bulb.

The filament of a halogen bulb runs at higher temps than an incandescent. For most laymen, higher temperature is expressed as more heat.

While there are a lot of other factors that come into play, put a halogen bulb in a closed top fixture that was not designed with halogen in mind, and the fixture will run hotter with the halogen bulb than with the incandescent.

That's absolutely not true. Halogen bulbs actually produce less heat in the fixture for a bulb of the same wattage, although the difference is negligible. Incandescent light bulbs (of which halogen is a subtype) convert electrical power into heat, and a little tiny bit of light. The amount of light produced is very small compared to the amount of heat, so a 60W incandescent bulb may produce 58W of heat and radiate 2W of visible light. Since halogen bulbs run the filament at higher temperature, they are more efficient and more of the energy is converted to visible light, so a 60W halogen lamp may produce 57W of heat and 3W of light. That's a 50% increase in light output, but a very small difference in heat in the fixture - and it's a reduction not an increase.

While you are certainly correct that most laymen interpret "higher temperature" to mean "more heat", we can all be thankful that those people aren't trying to engineer things or teach people - because they have no idea what they're talking about.


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