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lyndon9 07-03-2008 06:39 PM

breaker keeps kicking off
 
I have a microwave that is plugged into the kitchen outlet and after about 2 minutes of use it kicks the breaker off. Is this a potential fire hazard if i let it go or do i need a larger amp breaker? If i set the power control to 8 on the microwave it seems to work fine. There are no large appliances on the breaker other than the microwave. i think its on a 15 amp breaker. Is 15 too small for that microwave maybe?

buletbob 07-03-2008 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lyndon9 (Post 135817)
I have a microwave that is plugged into the kitchen outlet and after about 2 minutes of use it kicks the breaker off. Is this a potential fire hazard if i let it go or do i need a larger amp breaker? If i set the power control to 8 on the microwave it seems to work fine. There are no large appliances on the breaker other than the microwave. i think its on a 15 amp breaker. Is 15 too small for that microwave maybe?

yes its a potential fire hazard if the breaker fails to trip.
Microwaves should be on 20amp dedicated circuits. read the spec plate that on the mic. it will tell you the amp rating of the appliance.
good luck, BOB

Termite 07-03-2008 11:08 PM

Bob's right on, but I'm going to expand on what he told you, because the nature of your question makes me think you aren't quite a master electrician! (no offense)

The breaker is tripping because it is a 15 amp circuit, and your microwave is drawing 15 amps or more. The fact that it is tripping means that it is doing its job effectively, cutting power before sacrificing the wire and possibly causing a fire. Chances are, that circuit is 14 gauge wire, which is too small for a 20 amp breaker.

What needs to happen here is that you need to verify the wire size on the circuit. If you're lucky, it will be 12 gauge and you can install a 20 amp breaker or pay someone to do it for you. If it is 14 gauge wire, you need to look into having a dedicated receptacle and circuit installed to power your microwave.

buletbob 07-04-2008 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 135888)
Bob's right on, but I'm going to expand on what he told you, because the nature of your question makes me think you aren't quite a master electrician! (no offense)

The breaker is tripping because it is a 15 amp circuit, and your microwave is drawing 15 amps or more. The fact that it is tripping means that it is doing its job effectively, cutting power before sacrificing the wire and possibly causing a fire. Chances are, that circuit is 14 gauge wire, which is too small for a 20 amp breaker.

What needs to happen here is that you need to verify the wire size on the circuit. If you're lucky, it will be 12 gauge and you can install a 20 amp breaker or pay someone to do it for you. If it is 14 gauge wire, you need to look into having a dedicated receptacle and circuit installed to power your microwave.

:thumbup: I could not of said it any better! THANKS BOB

jerryh3 07-04-2008 07:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 135888)
Bob's right on, but I'm going to expand on what he told you, because the nature of your question makes me think you aren't quite a master electrician! (no offense)

The breaker is tripping because it is a 15 amp circuit, and your microwave is drawing 15 amps or more. The fact that it is tripping means that it is doing its job effectively, cutting power before sacrificing the wire and possibly causing a fire. Chances are, that circuit is 14 gauge wire, which is too small for a 20 amp breaker.

What needs to happen here is that you need to verify the wire size on the circuit. If you're lucky, it will be 12 gauge and you can install a 20 amp breaker or pay someone to do it for you. If it is 14 gauge wire, you need to look into having a dedicated receptacle and circuit installed to power your microwave.

I don't think the microwave itself is drawing more than 15 amps, but something else is on that ciruit combined with the microwave is overloading the circuit. My guess is that the refrigerator in on one of the small appliance circuits and the microwave is being plugged into that same circuit. Either way, a dedicated circuit for the microwave would solve the problem.

$J0 07-04-2008 10:33 AM

Has this always happened since the very first time you used the microwave? OR has it being do it just recently? Everyone is right with it should be on own circuit. But, the magnets inside breakers may get weak over time if it is an old breaker. A simple breaker replacement may solve your problems.

Stavop 07-04-2008 08:22 PM

I'm new here but I always thought it to be odd that male plugs were configured differently for 15 and 20 amps. A 20 amp male will have one prong sideways while the 15 will have both current carrying conductor prongs in the same direction. Usually the 15 amp plugs on a piece of utilization equipment like a microwave should not be able to draw more but they do when there's a problem. You may have a mic problem.


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