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powdaking 01-19-2013 11:58 PM

Branch circuit
 
Hi guys, I'm new to this forum so be gentle with me :-)

I'm developing my basement and doing all the work myself, although no experience.
All permits are in place, so will obviously working
to code and being inspected.
Plumbing/framing done now on to electrics.
I want to run cable from breaker to light in storage, two wall scones 3 receptacles and a switch for the scones. What is the best route for the circuit to take?

Hope you can help and thanks.

Stubbie 01-20-2013 12:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by powdaking (Post 1097579)
Hi guys, I'm new to this forum so be gentle with me :-)

I'm developing my basement and doing all the work myself, although no experience.
All permits are in place, so will obviously working
to code and being inspected.
Plumbing/framing done now on to electrics.
I want to run cable from breaker to light in storage, two wall scones 3 receptacles and a switch for the scones. What is the best route for the circuit to take?

Hope you can help and thanks.

Your question is a little lacking details but if that is all your going to have ....


Code now requires a neutral to be present in switch boxes so route a home run to a switch box then onward power to the next switch box if the switches are in diferent locations then switched power out of each switch box to your lights. It looks like all you need is one 15 amp branch circuit for lights. I'd put the receptacles on a second circuit. Depending on what you going to plug into the receptacles a 15 amp circuit would be fine. If your thinking about using a space heater in the winter time go with a 20 amp branch circuit.

powdaking 01-20-2013 01:19 AM

Thanks stubie

The three receptacles are the the home entertainment, and the lights are on the same wall do thought it'd be easier to keep them on the same circuit. Don't have too many spare breaker slots in my panel.

Thanks for the advice.

NJMarine 01-20-2013 05:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stubie (Post 1097586)
Your question is a little lacking details but if that is all your going to have ....


Code now requires a neutral to be present in switch boxes so route a home run to a switch box then onward power to the next switch box if the switches are in diferent locations then switched power out of each switch box to your lights. It looks like all you need is one 15 amp branch circuit for lights. I'd put the receptacles on a second circuit. Depending on what you going to plug into the receptacles a 15 amp circuit would be fine. If your thinking about using a space heater in the winter time go with a 20 amp branch circuit.

I agree.
On the neutral being required in the switch box, I believe it is best to get a neutral in the box, but there are exception to this NEC Article.
404.2(C).
“Switches Controlling Lighting Loads. For switches control lighting loads supplied by a grounded general purpose branch circuit, the grounded circuit conductor for the controlled lighting circuit shall be provided at the switch location.
Exception: the grounded circuit conductor shall be permitted to be omitted from the switch enclosure where either of the following conditions in (1) or (2) apply:
1. Conductors for switches controlling lighting loads enter the box to a raceway. The raceway shall have sufficient cross sectional area to accommodate the extension of the grounded circuit conductor of the lighting circuit to the switch location whether or not the conductors in the raceway are required to be increased in size to comply with 310.15(B)(2)(a).
2. Cable assemblies for switches controlling lighting loads enter the box through framing cavity that is open at the top or bottom on the same floor level, or through a wall, floor, or ceiling that is unfinished on one side.”

brric 01-20-2013 08:17 AM

If this is going to be a living space, receptacle spacing should be maintained.

joed 01-20-2013 12:06 PM

The best route is the one that uses the least cable. Go in order to the switches and receptacles in what ever order you encounter them as you move out from the panel. Feed the lights from the switch boxes. You can even go to one switch or receptacle and then branch two different directions if that saves cable.

Billy_Bob 01-20-2013 12:21 PM

One nice thing about running electrical wires (as opposed to plumbing pipes) is you can route them any way your little heart desires. So if there is an obstacle in the way routing the wiring one way (window, plumbing, long block of wood to drill through, etc.), then you can simply route the wires a different way.

powdaking 01-20-2013 06:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brric
If this is going to be a living space, receptacle spacing should be maintained.

Yep.... Pool room, water closet and big big big TV :-)

MisterZ 01-20-2013 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by powdaking (Post 1098105)
Yep.... Pool room, water closet and big big big TV :-)


if im not mistaken, bathrooms require a dedicated outlet.
looks like you'll need to run another circuit;)

k_buz 01-20-2013 10:41 PM

An entire bathroom can be on one 20A circuit, but no other rooms can be fed by that circuit.

MisterZ 01-20-2013 10:44 PM

exactly, also requires GFI outlet.
sorry too lazy to post the actual code listing:D

powdaking 01-21-2013 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz
An entire bathroom can be on one 20A circuit, but no other rooms can be fed by that circuit.

It's only going to be a toilet and sink, seems a waste of a circuit for one GFCI and one exhaust fan....... But if that is code where I am, then so be it, that'll be done. Oh I forgot... As its only a toilet and sink, is it code for me to also have an exhaust fan? Alberta, Canada.

joed 01-22-2013 07:51 AM

Canada does not have the dedicated circuit to a bathroom rule. You can put that stuff on any circuit you want as long as you don't go over the 12 devices per circuit rule. Lighting must be on a 15 amp circuit. The receptacle by the sink does need to be GFCI.

jbfan 01-22-2013 09:40 AM

That's why it is important to list your location, so you could have gotten the correct advice at the start!

powdaking 01-22-2013 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan
That's why it is important to list your location, so you could have gotten the correct advice at the start!

Sorry guys, I'm a newbie.
I live in Alberta Canada


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