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jjrbus 04-10-2011 05:56 PM

Bonding wire
 
I have a Zinsco 100A panel I need to replace. I will be replacing this with a 100A panel.

The way I read it I will need to add a bonding wire and upgrade the ground.

The way I misread it is the bonding wire must be connected to the water line within 5 feet of were it enters.

The problem is the water pipe comes out of the ground and about 2 feet up the outside wall. Then enters the concrete block wall an runs about 6 ft into the attic(inside the concrete blocks), crosses the attic where it is unaccessible (unless I rip hole in ceiling) T's off for washer and then T's off in an interior wall to supply hot water tank.

Where would the best place to run the bonding wire to?
JIm 0311

jjrbus 04-10-2011 06:41 PM

1 Attachment(s)
POst would make more sense with picture! Thought I added it?

AllanJ 04-10-2011 07:20 PM

Drive a ground rod (sometimes you need two depending on the kind of soil). Run the #6 copper ground wire from the panel to this.

Add a branch (#6 for service up to 100 amps, #4 for larger service) going outside to the pipe just where it enters the house.

Where is the water meter?

brric 04-10-2011 07:52 PM

Within 5' of where it enters the house means no further than 5' after it enters the house. In warmer climates where the pipes are exposed ooutside the house your grounding electrode conductor could be terminated there. FWIW, that clothes dryer in front of the electrical panel is a definite code violation.

nap 04-10-2011 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brric (Post 626975)
. FWIW, that clothes dryer in front of the electrical panel is a definite code violation.

and unless it is 3' from the doorway to the right side of the panel, so is the shelf and the washer.

brric 04-10-2011 08:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nap (Post 626997)
and unless it is 3' from the doorway to the right side of the panel, so is the shelf and the washer.

I believe as long as there is 30" or more from the right side of the panel, including the door, it is code compliant in that direction.

nap 04-10-2011 09:12 PM

serve up the crow Joed. It is 30". Not sure why I had 36" stuck in my head.

so, if there must be at least 30" clear space that the panel sets within. It will be close but it could be compliant as it is.

jjrbus 04-12-2011 02:43 PM

Hmmmmm Last year I had a licensed electrician give me a price on upgrading this to 150A. He never mentioned any of these code violations? Yes I am 100% sure he is licensed.

I do not see moving the service entrance and panel or eliminating the washer/dryer as options. The main panel in pic is 31 inch from the actual entrance door, not the casing to the right side? of the panel.

Because I am replacing panel with 100A and not upgrading service, would it be considered a repair and not have to comply with all the newer codes??

Any options or suggestions greatly appreciated?
JIm 0311

nap 04-12-2011 03:45 PM

that work space code has been in existence for several code cycles as it is and likely very similar for many more code cycles (a cycle is 3 years).

You need to have a working space 30" (or the width of the equipment, whichever is greater) from side to side dedicated to electrical equipment. The panel can be placed anywhere within that 30". You need to have 36" clear space outward from the face of the panel for that full 30" width. Then, dedicated space above and below the electrical equipment equal to the width and depth of the equipment and extending from the floor to a point 6' above the equipment or the structural ceiling, whichever is lower.

that means, basically, you cannot have anything within 3' of the front of that panel.

with the dimension you gave, you are fine width wise. You do need to move the dryer though. There is simply nothing you can do to make it code compliant until it is at least 36" from the face of the panel.

jjrbus 04-12-2011 03:58 PM

I misunderstood the reply's. I thought they meant 30" from the entrance door.

House was built in 1968.

I'm sure no one would do this to skirt the code, but what if the washer and dryer were in the shed when the inspection is done? I'm not suggesting anyone do this I'm just curious?

Thank you for the reply. JIm 0311

nap 04-12-2011 04:26 PM

if the space is clear when inspected, it will pass.

It is meant as for safety purposes when working on the electrical equipment. Hanging over a dryer to work on a hot panel is not safe and when there is an emergency, moving the dryer isn't likely to happen.

jjrbus 04-12-2011 05:42 PM

Now I get it!! 30" workspace , not 15" each way off the center of the panel :thumbup:

nap 04-12-2011 07:41 PM

right. a 30" wide space. The panel can set anywhere in that 30". In your case, the one panel looks like it is to the extreme right of the space. You can have 2 panels in that space (such as like you do) but you still only need only a 30" space (if they both fit within that 30" space such as they do with yours).

jjrbus 04-29-2011 05:37 PM

I'm in SW FLorida and where the waterline comes vertically out of the ground outside the house about 1 1/2' then there is a metal faucet and the pipe enters the house through the concrete block wall. From the faucet and throughout the rest of the house the pipe is copper. From the faucet to the ground/earth the pipe is plastic.

I have no idea how far the plastic pipe goes in the ground. This is not original to the house and was a repair done at some time. The water meter is about 100 feet from the house at the street.

Should this still be bonded? JIm 0311

nap 04-29-2011 06:10 PM

The pipe should be bonded but not as a grounding electrode. It needs to be bonded to ensure pipe system inside the house does not become energized.


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