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-   -   Best way to crimp small disconnects (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/best-way-crimp-small-disconnects-12227/)

Alpha Crow 10-08-2007 07:29 PM

Best way to crimp small disconnects
 
Using some small disconnects (flat type) for some electrical parts on my motorcycle. What's the best way to get them to stay on there? The plastic crimping isn't really staying on to the small wires so well. I mean, its staying on, but when re-routing the wires around and a small tug will sometimes pull the wire out of the disconnect.

Any tricks to make it stay? Ways to solder it onto the metal in the disconnect? Tape? Better crimper, lol?

Stubbie 10-08-2007 07:46 PM

Are you talking about spade connectors? Like these....

http://autoelectrical.com/pics/connectors/qdf-ins.gif


stubbie

jbfan 10-08-2007 07:49 PM

On smaller wire, I double the wire into the connector and then crimp it.

Alpha Crow 10-08-2007 08:54 PM

yeah, spade connectors (insulated type). Wire is so thin it won't grab very well when I crimp it. Got the small type disconnects for like 22-26 (about that) gauge.

How do you double it? Fold it over?

Stubbie 10-08-2007 09:36 PM

Are you using a wire crimper or pliers?

I can't imagine your wire being smaller than what those connectors you bought are designed for.

Are you using the right crimp slot?

You using these type crimpers....
http://www.toolspot.co.uk/products/W...g%20Tool_t.jpg

Alpha Crow 10-08-2007 11:20 PM

Yes, very similar to those. I could totally be doing it wrong, but I'm using the end part that's usually for crimping. I suppose it could totally be the wrong tool for the plastic. It bites down, but doesn't cinch tight and while moving the wires around, starts working its way out.

Is it possible to melt the plastic sleeves onto the wires, lol? Or apply solder anywhere? Or am I just jacking up the crimping job that bad and it normally should stay pretty strong?

bigchaz 10-09-2007 06:25 AM

Normally you can put a dab of solder right where the wire comes through the insulated part. If its fully insulated though that would be hard to do.

Like jbfan said double the wire in the crimper. For example strip more of the wire than you need too. Then fold the exposed wire over itself a few times. Youll have more wire to crimp down onto then

Stubbie 10-09-2007 01:37 PM

Do you need the wires to be a disconnect? Could you solder them together then shrink tube them? Are you running straight from the battery, from a switch or.....?

Alpha Crow 10-10-2007 09:08 PM

Has to be a disconnect. Replacement LEDs from a standard bulb. Have to be able to remove the rear section that the LEDs are attached to.

I'll look at the dab of solder and folding it. Thanks again for the info, helped a lot!

Stubbie 10-10-2007 09:56 PM

Have you looked into small wire pigtail disconnects? Probably can find some at radio shack........Kinda like these I can't find an online image of what i am talking about. These are male/female plugs similar to the black ones on the left. Your car has several of them. You just solder the pigtails to your wire and shrink tube the connection.
http://store.jbn-duraline.com/librar...ire_group2.jpg

Alpha Crow 10-10-2007 11:24 PM

Thanks Stubbie! Those would be perfect. I'll check it out Friday at radio shack. Don't know why it didn't occur to me to look there first, instead of Lowe's. Would be cool if they had a 3 wire connector (not a splice) so I could run them all close together and be quick and easy.

Stubbie 10-11-2007 09:33 AM

We used these all the time in the auto industry as repair kits when a harness had an issue or recall. Might try a dealerhsip parts department for a connector repair kit. They will come with the shrink tube and cylinder crimp connectors or you can solder then apply the shrink tube. It will have both the male and female ends with about 6 " pigtails. the wire size will most likely be bigger than what you have but it would work if soldered and shrink tubed.

Found an image..http://www.shoppalstores.com/clreyno.../pico5603d.jpg

Stubbie

47_47 10-11-2007 10:35 AM

In addition to the shrink tubing, I would also apply some dielectric grease between the LED and connector to prevent corrosion.

Alpha Crow 10-12-2007 12:59 PM

Best way to put on grease? I've heard it's better to blob it on and push the connectors together, which will still get a good connection. Other hand, heard to make the connection and put the grease on then, to avoid causing a poor connection.

elkangorito 10-12-2007 02:01 PM

My comments in red.

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigchaz (Post 67134)
Normally you can put a dab of solder right where the wire comes through the insulated part. If its fully insulated though that would be hard to do.

The mechanical connection of ANY soldered parts is NOT recommended. Why? Because the ductility of solder is poor. In other words, mechanically connected soldered parts can become loose after some time, causing a problem. For this reason, this type of connection is prohibited in the Australian Standards. Perhaps Stubbie can look in the NEC for a similar thing?

Quote:

Originally Posted by 47_47 (Post 67577)
In addition to the shrink tubing, I would also apply some dielectric grease between the LED and connector to prevent corrosion.

Dielectric grease serves no purpose whatsoever in the "power electrical" world. As a matter of fact, it could create problems. Dielectric grease must not be used under these circumstances.


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