Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-28-2012, 02:00 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NY
Posts: 92
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


I'm wondering if the experienced have any tips or best practices when splicing stranded wire and solid wire together.

Often I find myself doubting the integrity of such a splice due to some of these observations:
- strands bunch up into a ball, usually at the inner tip of the wire nut, and is not in even contact with the stripped area of the solid wire
- strands wrap evenly around solid but easily slides off solid wire when putting on a wire nut or tucking the wire pair back into a jbox.
- strands held tightly under wire nut, but when nut removed to inspect, some strands appear to have broken off (particularly with smaller gauge thinner strand wires)

So how do folks here make consistently good, mechanically secure, stranded-to-solid splices?

Do you pre-twist or not twist the bare portions then cap & twist with wire nut?

Do you continue the twisting through some (i.e. about an inch) of the insulated portion of the wires so that the friction of insulation keeps from easily pulling the wires apart?

Do you also tape the wires together?

Do you rather use crimp connectors or solder?

Thanks!

sixspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 02:27 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: NJ
Posts: 377
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


I am not an electrician but I have been using this process for years without any issues

1. pre-twist stranded wires
2. using side cutting pliers, I twist stranded and solid wires together, making sure that solid wire is twisted
3. again using the side cutting plier, I nip the end then install a wire nut
4. finally, I tape wires and wire nut with blacktape

good luck

allthumbsdiy is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to allthumbsdiy For This Useful Post:
sixspeed (09-28-2012)
Old 09-28-2012, 02:35 PM   #3
Lic Electrical Inspector
 
electures's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: The Great Police State of New Jersey
Posts: 1,731
Rewards Points: 1,068
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Use the correct wirenut listed for the size and type of conductors being spliced. No need to pre-twist. Strip equal amounts off each conductor. Make sure ends line up. Twist on wire nut. Make sure no conductor is exposed. And finally;



Taping is for amatures!!!!!

Here we go again!!
__________________
All responses based on the 2011 NEC.
If you live in New Jersey click here. All other states click here.
Please check with local, county and state officials as laws may vary.
Sizing motors here. Online motor calculator here. Online calculators here.
electures is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to electures For This Useful Post:
Code05 (09-30-2012), jrclen (09-28-2012), mpoulton (09-28-2012), stickboy1375 (09-29-2012)
Old 09-28-2012, 02:51 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ava, MO
Posts: 30
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by electures View Post
Use the correct wirenut listed for the size and type of conductors being spliced. No need to pre-twist. Strip equal amounts off each conductor. Make sure ends line up. Twist on wire nut. Make sure no conductor is exposed. And finally;



Taping is for amatures!!!!!

Here we go again!!

This is what I do, except I'm an amateur and I tape the wires parallel below the connector to keep tension off of the joint.
lynxpilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 04:27 PM   #5
Master Electrician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Ontario
Posts: 1,165
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


If you have the stranded a fraction long than the solid so the wirenut latches onto it first it'll hold much better.
__________________
Sarcasm is my friend
I'm here to learn too, i do mostly commercial/industrial/new construction and this place is a great way to pick up tips on residential from some good electrical minds. Excuse the spelling, my phone has a mind of it's own.
andrew79 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to andrew79 For This Useful Post:
Oso954 (09-28-2012)
Old 09-28-2012, 04:35 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 229
Rewards Points: 152
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by electures View Post
Taping is for amatures!!!!!

Here we go again!!
Sorry, but I don't usually point out spelling/gramatical errors in forums, but if you are going to shout it, make sure it is spelled correctly.
herdfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 04:41 PM   #7
Lic Electrical Inspector
 
electures's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: The Great Police State of New Jersey
Posts: 1,731
Rewards Points: 1,068
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by herdfan

Sorry, but I don't usually point out spelling/gramatical errors in forums, but if you are going to shout it, make sure it is spelled correctly.
Any how...,
__________________
All responses based on the 2011 NEC.
If you live in New Jersey click here. All other states click here.
Please check with local, county and state officials as laws may vary.
Sizing motors here. Online motor calculator here. Online calculators here.
electures is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to electures For This Useful Post:
Code05 (09-30-2012), stickboy1375 (09-29-2012)
Old 09-28-2012, 06:49 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 296
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


You could tin the stranded. If it were a critical connection that my someone depended on for survival, I would probably do that. If not, it is just too much work.
ionized is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 08:12 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NY
Posts: 92
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by allthumbsdiy View Post
I am not an electrician but I have been using this process for years without any issues

1. pre-twist stranded wires
2. using side cutting pliers, I twist stranded and solid wires together, making sure that solid wire is twisted
3. again using the side cutting plier, I nip the end then install a wire nut
4. finally, I tape wires and wire nut with blacktape

good luck
I see what you mean here. It's kind of like treating the stranded like a solid, so that when both are twisted together they sort of form a double helix, rather than the individual strands meshing with the solid. I've tried doing this and it does take a bit of effort to make the solid wire twist equally upon the bundled stranded one. But this is sometimes nearly impossible when the wire gauges are not the same, especially when the stranded one is the smaller gauge versus the solid (i.e. those stranded flying leads from some lamp fixtures).
sixspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 08:44 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NY
Posts: 92
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by electures View Post
Use the correct wirenut listed for the size and type of conductors being spliced. No need to pre-twist. Strip equal amounts off each conductor. Make sure ends line up. Twist on wire nut. Make sure no conductor is exposed. And finally;



Taping is for amatures!!!!!

Here we go again!!

Haha.. I've read many a discussion here about taping...

I found that when I strip equal amounts off the stranded and the solid, I usually have to trim off some of the solid because inevitably there's more bare solid that ends up not being in contact with the strands in the splice. This is probably due to the nature that the stranded wire is more pliable and thus does more of the coiling around the solid under the wire nut. Oftentimes the solid wire does not even twist underneath the wire nut. The strands do all the twisting around the solid, and this is the condition that often causes the stranded wire to easily slip right off the solid, because there is no twist in the solid to mechanically hold the strands in place. Pardon the analogy but the stranded wire is like a dancer sliding off her pole...
sixspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2012, 09:10 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: NY
Posts: 92
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew79 View Post
If you have the stranded a fraction long than the solid so the wirenut latches onto it first it'll hold much better.
It would seem that the friction from the compression of the wire nut is all that is holding the stranded wire to the solid wire. Since wire nuts are conical in shape, it is only at the inner tip where this friction is greatest or even exists. Thus, for example, if the two wires are each stripped 1 inch and held parallel together, there may be only 1/8th inch of solid contact in that splice - at the point where the wire nut creates the most friction.

This then leads me to ask, is the little metallic coil inside wire nuts a reliable (and rated) conductor for the splice, or must all conductors of a splice make secure, mechanical contact with each other and not depend on the coil inside the nut to be the means of conduction? What if the wire nut slips off? A splice made by mere friction of the wire nut will obviously break...

Last edited by sixspeed; 09-28-2012 at 09:15 PM.
sixspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2012, 12:15 PM   #12
E2 Electrician
 
stickboy1375's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Litchfield, CT
Posts: 5,142
Rewards Points: 2,076
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Strip wire, align ends, install wirenut...


Yes, folks, it really is that simple.
stickboy1375 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to stickboy1375 For This Useful Post:
andrew79 (09-30-2012), brric (09-29-2012), Code05 (09-30-2012), jrclen (09-29-2012), k_buz (09-29-2012), OCPik4chu (10-02-2012)
Old 09-29-2012, 06:36 PM   #13
Lic Electrical Inspector
 
electures's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: The Great Police State of New Jersey
Posts: 1,731
Rewards Points: 1,068
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by stickboy1375
Strip wire, align ends, install wirenut...

Yes, folks, it really is that simple.
Careful you don't mispelt a word.
__________________
All responses based on the 2011 NEC.
If you live in New Jersey click here. All other states click here.
Please check with local, county and state officials as laws may vary.
Sizing motors here. Online motor calculator here. Online calculators here.
electures is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to electures For This Useful Post:
stickboy1375 (09-29-2012)
Old 09-30-2012, 02:46 AM   #14
Master Electrician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Ontario
Posts: 1,165
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Best practices for splicing stranded to solid wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by sixspeed

It would seem that the friction from the compression of the wire nut is all that is holding the stranded wire to the solid wire. Since wire nuts are conical in shape, it is only at the inner tip where this friction is greatest or even exists. Thus, for example, if the two wires are each stripped 1 inch and held parallel together, there may be only 1/8th inch of solid contact in that splice - at the point where the wire nut creates the most friction.

This then leads me to ask, is the little metallic coil inside wire nuts a reliable (and rated) conductor for the splice, or must all conductors of a splice make secure, mechanical contact with each other and not depend on the coil inside the nut to be the means of conduction? What if the wire nut slips off? A splice made by mere friction of the wire nut will obviously break...
Well of your twisting your wirenuts right the wires will twist themselves but that a whole other thread. As stated previously it really is as simple as strip wire and install wirenut. No rocket science needed.

__________________
Sarcasm is my friend
I'm here to learn too, i do mostly commercial/industrial/new construction and this place is a great way to pick up tips on residential from some good electrical minds. Excuse the spelling, my phone has a mind of it's own.
andrew79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stranded wire connections at subpanel. woodardhsd Electrical 4 03-18-2011 01:41 PM
Changing Two Gang Outlet to Three Gang Outlet vbullinger Electrical 9 01-10-2011 06:13 PM
connecting straight wire to stranded Cossack Electrical 5 07-30-2010 02:52 PM
6/3 NM stranded or solid to run to 50A subpanel amakarevic Electrical 5 10-31-2008 01:14 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.