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Old 02-23-2010, 10:26 AM   #1
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Bathroom wiring


Hello-

I am new to this forum and would like to thank you for taking your time to help me here.

I have remodeled many rooms in my house with no issues but tackling the bathroom electrical. By the way, I live in Indiana.

Here is the set up:

- Dual throw light switch
- GFCI receptacle with another receptacle down stream
- Vanity lighting
- Exhaust fan

My house was built in 1948 but the electrical has been upgraded. I tore the walls out and got to work. I removed the electrical outlet that was down stream from the GFCI. Now I am trying to figure out how to re wire everything. The problem I'm running into is the bathroom is fed by multiple sources!

1 source wire is a 2 wire set up and feeds the light switch.

The second source is a 3 wire set up and feeds directly into the GFCI receptacle.

The prior set up allowed the light switch to control the outlets as well as the vanity lighting (the light switch was a single throw).

I installed the dual throw so I can control the exhaust fan (wasn't present before) and the lighting seperate.

How could I wire this, remain compliant with code, and control the lighting seperate from the exhaust fan and not remove any circuits?

I have attached a possible wiring diagram. The only question I have about it is about the ground. Even though the fan nor lighting is fed through the grounded GFCI, could I still tie the ground wire to this outlet?

I also attached another possibility (Bathroom wiring diagram #1) which only has 1 GFCI outlet. This is the set up I prefer but I just don't know how it would work and still allow the switch to turn everything on and off.

Once again, thank you!
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Bathroom wiring-possible-wiring-diagram.jpg   Bathroom wiring-bathroom-wiring-diagram-1.jpg  

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Old 02-23-2010, 10:38 AM   #2
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Bathroom wiring


Since you are down to bare stud and installing new wiring the circuit should meet the current code requirements.

This would be one 20 amp circuit to serve only the receptacles if receptacles in other bathrooms are on this circuit. You could add the lighting and fans to the 20 amp circuit if it only fed one bathroom.

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Old 02-23-2010, 12:32 PM   #3
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Bathroom wiring


Jim,

Thank you for your response. I'm aware that The Indiana Electrical Code requires a dedicated 20amp circuit to serve the bathroom and that this circuit must be protected by a GFCI.

This is how I would like to wire it but how could I do so and give control of the circuit to the light switch?

By the way, the second power source is a dedicated power source.

Would this work?

- Run source to GFCI and connect to the line side
- Connect the Light switch to the load side
- Connect the fan and vanity light to the light switch (including the ground)
- Ground the light switch with the GFCI ground
- Run the neutral from the GFCI and connect it to the fan and lighting neutral

Would this give the light switch control of the vanity lighting and exhaust fan? If so, this entire circuit would be protected?

Once again, thank you for your help!
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Old 02-25-2010, 09:18 AM   #4
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Bathroom wiring


Ok......

So I am going to remove on of the circuits in the bathroom and re run the circuit from the box. Here is my idea.

- From the breaker panel run 12/2 into the GFCI receptacle line side.
- From the load side run 12/2 into the 2 gang switch
- Run a hot wire from each switch (one to the lights and one to the fan)
- Run the neutral from each fixture back into the load side of the GFCI
- Pig tail all the grounds and attach to the GFCI

Doing this should meet code as well as protect the entire circuit.

My only other thought is to do the same as above but only run the 12/2 to the bottom throw on the switch and back to the fan so it would be protected and then use the remaining circuit to power the lighting. Would this be responsible since the existing circuit doesn't have a ground?

Does anyone have any other sugestions?
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Old 02-25-2010, 12:13 PM   #5
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Bathroom wiring


It sounds fine but I would suggest you not use the LOAD side for the lights and fan. They are not required to be GFCI (unless directly over tub or shower) and using the load side will leave you in the dark if the GFCI trips.
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Old 02-25-2010, 10:43 PM   #6
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Bathroom wiring


Thank you Joed.....

I have read many mentions to the fan being directly over the tub/shower which confuses me. I'm a very black and white person. That being so, when I think of a ceiling mount exhaust fan mounted in the ceiling directly over the shower/tub. What confuses me is that I am planning to mount it in the back wall of the rub area approx 7 foot above the actual tub. Because it is in the actual shower area but not DIRECTLY above the shower, does it have to be GFCI protected? I would think so but as I said, I'm a very black or white type person and reading the electrical code leaves too much room for interpertation for my tastes......
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:30 AM   #7
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Bathroom wiring


If it is within the tub area then it needs to be GFCI. I think the test is if it can be touched while standing in the tub. It sounds like yours should be on the GFCI.

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