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SS396 09-16-2007 07:12 PM

Bathroom Wiring
 
I am ready to add electrical provisions to a new bathroom. I added a separate 12/2 w/g nm on 20 a breaker to the new room. I plan to feed a GFCI first and then power everything else, (lights, fan and another outlet or two), from the load side of the GFCI. Is this a correct plan or are there other suggestions?
Also, I read some where that a receptacle is supposed to be oriented so the the ground is on top. Is there a correct/incorrect orientation for a receptacle? Thank You

Andy in ATL 09-16-2007 07:38 PM

In most instances the lights can be on the line side, only the receptacles need to be protected. If the light/fan is within the shower then it must be protected also. Whether the ground is up or down is totally up to you. It truly makes no difference.

Stubbie 09-16-2007 07:41 PM

Quote:

I am ready to add electrical provisions to a new bathroom. I added a separate 12/2 w/g nm on 20 a breaker to the new room. I plan to feed a GFCI first and then power everything else, (lights, fan and another outlet or two), from the load side of the GFCI. Is this a correct plan or are there other suggestions?
Your plan is fine. I do have a few suggestions. First in order to be code compliant the 20 amp circuit must remain in that bathroom. It can't go outside to any thing else. If the other outlets are in this same bathroom then just protect them from the load terminals. Operate your lights and fan from the line terminals of the gfci. Should be some backwire holes to carry power onward to the lights and fan... of course you have switches also. this way any trip of the gfci won't put you in the dark. There is no problem either with gfci on the entire bathroom your choice really.


Quote:

Also, I read some where that a receptacle is supposed to be oriented so the the ground is on top. Is there a correct/incorrect orientation for a receptacle?
Ground pin up......watch out cause this will be different than most homes. And people will stare at you like your nuts.

Actually there is no required up or down. I like the ground pin up I can explain if you ask.

One other thing... you do not need to install a 20 amp gfci that has the T slot. A 15 amp 5-15R is fine and most commonly used as they have 20 amp feed thru.

EDIT: As Andy said if light/fan is over shower it must be rated for the location and gfci protected.

Stubbie

Andy in ATL 09-19-2007 06:53 PM

Andy was wrong... upon further review of the code the light doesn't have to be protected if in the shower...however some lights may require it as part of their listing and some juridictions may have an addendum requiring it also. That being said I would(and always have) protect it anyways. The National Electric code is the minimium. My bad.:(

Stubbie 09-19-2007 07:10 PM

Well Andy looks like we missed that one...what really gripes me is you can't have a ceiling fan over your bathtub...of all the nerve :furious:

http://www.mikeholt.com/onlinetraini...00705340_2.jpg

Andy in ATL 09-20-2007 03:17 PM

It seems where i'm from we stick to recessed cans in the shower( something I forgot was the fixture must be rated for a damp location) or fan light combos. I've always as a habit protected these but after looking through the code it ONLY requires GFCI on recps. in various areas of a dwelling. Nowhere is a luminaire ever mentioned... I learn something new everyday in this field.


Edit to add: Stubbie, i'd love to hear your theory on ground up vs. ground down.

Stubbie 09-20-2007 04:16 PM

Theres not much basis to it really, pretty much all commercial installations (thats where I spent the most time before I retired) have the ground pin up. And we also wrapped our receptacles with tape since they always went in metal boxes crowded or not. Anyway the general thought is that if the plug pulls out of the receptacle enough to expose the prongs a short circuit or shocking hazard is present if the ground pin is down anything conductive being held by a person or otherwise that would get into contact inadvertently with the neutral and hot prongs seeing how they would be at the top. So its a pretty long stretch on safety and I don't know if there is any statistics of injury from something like this happening. Truth be known we commercial guys just want to be different.....:thumbsup:

Stubbie

HouseHelper 09-20-2007 04:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy in ATL (Post 63904)
It seems where i'm from we stick to recessed cans in the shower( something I forgot was the fixture must be rated for a damp location) or fan light combos. I've always as a habit protected these but after looking through the code it ONLY requires GFCI on recps. in various areas of a dwelling. Nowhere is a luminaire ever mentioned... I learn something new everyday in this field.


Edit to add: Stubbie, i'd love to hear your theory on ground up vs. ground down.

But if you check the installation instructions that come with vent units they specify GFCI protection is required if installed in a shower area. Since the NEC specifies equipment to be installed per mfg instructions, GFCI protection is required.

Andy in ATL 09-21-2007 03:28 PM

Totally agree


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