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-   -   Bathroom outlet - distance from tub?? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/bathroom-outlet-distance-tub-9575/)

plbsplbs 07-03-2007 01:31 AM

Bathroom outlet - distance from tub??
 
We are currently remodeling our master bath and would like to add an outlet on the wall opposite the vanity. The only thing on that wall is a towel bar and the door, and at the far end of the wall is the tub. Is there a minimum distance the outlet (12" off floor) needs to be from the tub? Is there a code issue with an outlet being below a towel bar? We're in NC if anyone happens to know state code... otherwise, is there a "standard" distance?

Also, there is already a GFCI outlet upstream from where this outlet will be wired. Is there any benefit to putting a GFCI outlet here as well? Or any reason not to?

thanks in advance!!

redline 07-03-2007 09:37 AM

Will will this outlet be used for?

Is the current circuit rated at 20 amps?

Definitely have this outlet connected to the gfci upstream from it.

plbsplbs 07-03-2007 12:41 PM

It's the existing bathroom circuit, which is 15 amp, 14/2 wiring as built (8 yrs ago). I'm just adding one more outlet, which we would use just for a lighted planter (Christmas tree type lights).

Thanks!

J. V. 07-03-2007 01:06 PM

According to article 210.8 (1) requires ground fault protection in bathrooms.

troubleseeker 07-03-2007 10:36 PM

There is no code problem that I know of relating to the towel bar, but there is not suppossed to be any recepticles within five feet of the tub or shower stall, but unless you do something really blatantly stupid, like put an outlet in the tub surround, or switches right outside a shower, most inspectors use common sense on this one, as it is often not physically possible to follow this to the letter in an average small bath room; make an effort to keep as much distance as possible. All the recepticles must be GFCI protected, either individually or through the load side of the first upstream device.

wiremeup 07-04-2007 10:51 PM

You can put an outlet anywhere in a bathroom as long as it is GFI protected. The 5 foot rule applies to outdoor hot tubs and pools, not bathrooms.

troubleseeker 07-07-2007 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wiremeup (Post 51563)
You can put an outlet anywhere in a bathroom as long as it is GFI protected. The 5 foot rule applies to outdoor hot tubs and pools, not bathrooms.

Not in my locality, but like I said, unless you do the stupidly obvious, it usually doesn't cause any grief. But it is 10' for anything around a pool, and they are pretty strict about that.

dmaceld 07-07-2007 11:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wiremeup (Post 51563)
You can put an outlet anywhere in a bathroom as long as it is GFI protected.

Not quite. IRC 2006 reprint of Section 406.8(C) of the NEC.

"E3902.11 Bathtub and shower space. A receptacle shall not be installed within or directly over a bathtub or shower stall."

HouseHelper 07-08-2007 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troubleseeker (Post 52056)
Not in my locality, but like I said, unless you do the stupidly obvious, it usually doesn't cause any grief. But it is 10' for anything around a pool, and they are pretty strict about that.

Yeah, but the OP is talking about a tub, not a pool. Switch or receptacle is OK anywhere outside the tub/shower area (outside of the area that normally gets wet is a good guideline). Receptacle must be GFCI protected, switch does not.

Speedy Petey 07-08-2007 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troubleseeker (Post 52056)
Not in my locality,

This is not your locality. You need to remember that. Do NOT quote codes that are specific to certain areas.

I quote the NEC. If a locality has amendments it is up to the individual to find that out.
That is ALL we can do.


HH is absolutely correct in his post.

crecore 07-09-2007 08:55 PM

Speedy, just wondering... do you use the latest NEC since NYS is still floating along on the 1999 adoption?

Speedy Petey 07-09-2007 09:22 PM

That is a loaded question.
When giving advice on boards such as this I always use the latest version of the NEC. That is the safest bet IMO.

At work I use the NYS residential building code as much as possible. Many times I will use the '05 NEC since whatever is in there is at least as stringent as the old code we are under.


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