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Old 12-27-2010, 10:39 PM   #1
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Bathroom outlet


The light switch in the restroom works, but the output does not. Any solutions?

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Old 12-27-2010, 11:13 PM   #2
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The light switch in the restroom works, but the output does not. Any solutions?
Is it a GFCI outlet? If so, does it need to be reset?

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Old 12-28-2010, 06:44 AM   #3
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The light switch in the restroom works, but the output does not. Any solutions?
I just installed a gfci receptical replacing what was originally there. White with neutral, black with hot, ground with green.
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Old 12-28-2010, 07:07 AM   #4
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Make sure that you wired it to the 'LINE' terminals and not the 'LOAD"

Also,use your tester and make sure the line is powered---some houses built in the 70s had GCFI breakers---

If no power also see if the circuit is powered off a gcfi breaker in another room.
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Old 12-28-2010, 07:29 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by oh'mike
Make sure that you wired it to the 'LINE' terminals and not the 'LOAD"

Also,use your tester and make sure the line is powered---some houses built in the 70s had GCFI breakers---

If no power also see if the circuit is powered off a gcfi breaker in another room.
Ok. The unit is wired in LINE. I've checked for gcfi breaker upstairs I do not find any. Is is possible for this unit to be linked with the kitchen gcfi unit?
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Old 12-28-2010, 07:39 AM   #6
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Ok. The unit is wired in LINE. I've checked for gcfi breaker upstairs I do not find any. Is is possible for this unit to be linked with the kitchen gcfi unit?
The house was built in '91.
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Old 12-28-2010, 10:29 AM   #7
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in older homes to save money one GFI would control all protected circuits. the GFI could be hid in such out of the way places as another bath, garage, outside plug, to name a few places I've found GFI's hiding.

with newer homes more GFI's are required so they tend to be located where they are used.


Not really sure when the rules changed off the top of my head. maybe somebody will chime in.
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Old 12-28-2010, 10:52 AM   #8
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The light switch in the restroom works, but the output does not. Any solutions?

First, you need to be more specific. Output of a light switch means the light does not work. Do you mean this is a light switch and a receptacle outlet, wired together in the same box? If so, here's my WAG:

You have said the wires are on the line side. Which wires? There's something going to the light somewhere. Make sure one neutral and one hot, both from the same cable, and heading straight to the fusebox (or as close as you can tell- the only thing that should be hot if all the wires are unhooked and the power is on) are on the line side. This is the non-protected side, and does not benefit from GFCI.

The light does not need to be GFCI protected, *provided* there isn't anything else wired on there that does, like more outlets. You can put this on the line side also.

Other wires leading to other outlets should be on the Load side of the GFCI, and will be protected.

Put electrical tape around the outlet, covering all of the screws, before you put it in the box. This helps stop ground to neutral shorts, which aren't noticible wihtout testers unless you have a GFCI.

If all of this is done, plug in a lamp or something to the GFCI, and see if it works. Then hit the test button, it should 'pop' the GFCI. Hit the reset button, it should turn it back on.

Good If :
your lights stayed on (if they're wired on the line side)
plug-in lamp turned off, then back on
Bad if:
plug-in lamp stayed on
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Old 12-28-2010, 10:41 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by JPraski

First, you need to be more specific. Output of a light switch means the light does not work. Do you mean this is a light switch and a receptacle outlet, wired together in the same box? If so, here's my WAG:

You have said the wires are on the line side. Which wires? There's something going to the light somewhere. Make sure one neutral and one hot, both from the same cable, and heading straight to the fusebox (or as close as you can tell- the only thing that should be hot if all the wires are unhooked and the power is on) are on the line side. This is the non-protected side, and does not benefit from GFCI.

The light does not need to be GFCI protected, *provided* there isn't anything else wired on there that does, like more outlets. You can put this on the line side also.

Other wires leading to other outlets should be on the Load side of the GFCI, and will be protected.

Put electrical tape around the outlet, covering all of the screws, before you put it in the box. This helps stop ground to neutral shorts, which aren't noticible wihtout testers unless you have a GFCI.

If all of this is done, plug in a lamp or something to the GFCI, and see if it works. Then hit the test button, it should 'pop' the GFCI. Hit the reset button, it should turn it back on.

Good If :
your lights stayed on (if they're wired on the line side)
plug-in lamp turned off, then back on
Bad if:
plug-in lamp stayed on
Thank you for your response. The light switch is separate single unit from the GFCI receptical. When testing the GFCI unit for power, it tells me that there is none all together.
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Old 12-28-2010, 11:00 PM   #10
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Thank you for your response. The light switch is separate single unit from the GFCI receptical. When testing the GFCI unit for power, it tells me that there is none all together.
Take the GFCI out, and measure voltage between the white and the black wire (there should be only two unconnected wires).
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Old 12-28-2010, 11:19 PM   #11
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in older homes to save money one GFI would control all protected circuits. the GFI could be hid in such out of the way places as another bath, garage, outside plug, to name a few places I've found GFI's hiding.
One time we found one in the kitchen behind a gas range.

Why did they do that?
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Old 12-29-2010, 08:08 AM   #12
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how are you testing?
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Old 12-29-2010, 08:35 AM   #13
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One time we found one in the kitchen behind a gas range.

Why did they do that?
Lots of reasons are possible. Is there a fridge near the range? Did the range used to electric? They frequently have 120V controls on both gas and electric ranges (my gas range does). Why GFCI? Who knows. Maybe they used it for microwave, too, or thought it counted as a general appliance outlet that requires it by code, or perhaps it was the beginning of the the run of the appliance outlets, and they put the GFCI on the beginning instead of in a convenient spot.

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