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Buff 05-12-2007 11:46 AM

Bathroom Lighting
 
just removed the medicine cabinet in my bathroom and am going to replace it with one that does now have a lighted vanity on the top.

I would like to install a new light above the new cabinet. I would want to convert the outlet on the right to an outlet with a switch and 1 place to plug something into.

What would be the best way to go about wiring everything up.
Please note, I am new at this. All I've ever installed is a new light fixture.

Any help?
http://home.rochester.rr.com/buffbloom/picture2.jpg

jwhite 05-12-2007 01:43 PM

What did those wires do before you disconnected them?

why did you not cap off all of the ends?

Buff 05-12-2007 10:32 PM

I didn't cap them all because I didn't have enough caps to do so.

The wires on the left were connected to a medicine cabinet with a lighted vanity. The wires on the right were connected to the power as well, they connect to the outlet through the wire-track.

gregzoll 05-13-2007 12:50 AM

Since it is Panduit and an external box, you can pretty much rip it out and toss it if you want. If you want to install a light with switch, your best bet is to change the outlet into a Switch/outlet and use the switch to control the light above the medicine cabinet. This means that you most likely will either have to cut a hole into the wall for the cabinet (makes for easy electrical install), or place it on the wall, cut a hole smaller then the cabinet to allow access to the internal wall structure, and then do the electrical work.

Your job is much easier then you think.

jwhite 05-13-2007 05:11 AM

It looks like you are saying that the wires on the left are the feed for the bath. The old vanity had a built in switch, and the wires on the right feed the GFI recepticle.

You will not have an easy time finding a GFI/sw device. It may be best to turn the existing gfi box into a two gang box. If you are willing to do some drywall work, now is the time to fish everything inside the walls and make it look cleaner. You may even be able to hide all the drywall damage behnd the new cabinet.

Buff 05-13-2007 09:46 AM

The wall is not drywall, it is some sort of wood partical board.

http://www.homedepot.com/cmc_upload/...31930173_3.jpghttp://images.lowes.com/product/conv...97116055md.jpghttp://images.lowes.com/product/conv...64164101md.jpg

Light above cabinet attached to the wires on the left. switch/outlet connected to the power attached to the light.

Can't be that hard?

gregzoll 05-13-2007 11:01 AM

It is not that hard. Most likely the panel is Masonite, which is easy to work with if you have the right tools (RotoZip or Dremel with cutting bit), and make a small enough hole where the cabinet will be, so you can fish everything that you need to.

If you can, you may be able to pull new wire to be able to run 12/2 to make a grounded connection, which is what a GCFI outlet should be connected to.

darren 05-13-2007 12:24 PM

Yup what you have in that picture will work except it will be illegal and against the electrical code. A plug in the bathroom has to be a GFI and the plug in your picture is not a GFI. Now if this plug is feed from another GFI it will be legal, test the other GFI to confirm it will turn off that plug in your bathroom.

If I were you I would cut into a wall with a two gang box and put the GFI one one side and the switch in another.

If your not willing to do the extra work and do it properly by installing a GFI please don't ask for anymore advice, no one on here wants to be responible when someone dies from your installtion.

BTW Greg a gfi does not need a ground. A GFI is a code compliant way of putting a 3 prong plug in where there is no ground.

jwhite 05-13-2007 12:29 PM

a new gfi circuit needs a ground. the other is for retrofit and does not count if you are running new wires.

If this rec were per chance feed from another gfi, then I have to ask from where? this rec must either be on a rec circuit that only feeds bath recs, or each bath must be on its own lighting/rec circuit.

Buff 05-14-2007 02:18 AM

Well I don't really know what I am doing, that's why I'm asking.

Do they make GFI switches like the one I want? I am willing to add another box for the switch if I have to.

How would it all be wired if I added another switch?

I want to do things the right/safe way. Like I said, I am new at this and basically need baby steps to get me to where I need to be.

J187 05-14-2007 03:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buff (Post 44816)
The wires on the left were connected to a medicine cabinet with a lighted vanity. The wires on the right were connected to the power as well, they connect to the outlet through the wire-track.


First off, if all you had were three wire caps, you'd likely be better off capping the two black wires and leaving one of the whites. Taping could have been as well. It would be a nice precaution.

I still it think it is a little ambiguous how it was wired. The wire on the right could have brought in power, pigtailed to supply the switched vanity and continued on to the GFCI. Also, the GFCI might be fed from inside the wall and as an after thought that source was tapped to power the lighted vainit, wires run through the raceway pigtail to the vanity and the circuit continues somewhere via the wires on the left.

Have you tested the wires there now to see which ones provide power?

Buff 05-15-2007 11:49 AM

I have taken apart the box and know for a fact that the outlet is wired through the track and into the wires on the left.

The picture was taken a while ago and all of the wires were capped off later that night when I got more caps.

J187 05-15-2007 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buff (Post 45083)
I have taken apart the box and know for a fact that the outlet is wired through the track and into the wires on the left.

The picture was taken a while ago and all of the wires were capped off later that night when I got more caps.


Meaning that there are no other wires entering the box on the wall, just those that from the track? So the wires on the left are the only wires that show power?

NateHanson 05-15-2007 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buff (Post 44918)
Well I don't really know what I am doing, that's why I'm asking.

Do they make GFI switches like the one I want? I am willing to add another box for the switch if I have to.

How would it all be wired if I added another switch?

I want to do things the right/safe way. Like I said, I am new at this and basically need baby steps to get me to where I need to be.

So you want to add a switch that controls the new light over the vanity, right?

I'll tell you how I'd do it, and the electricians can check my work.

Add a double box in the wall where the switch will be. Add a box where the light fixture will be. Fish three-conductor cable (12 or 14 depending on whether this is a 20 or 15A circuit) from the double box up to light fixture. Connect the white from the existing 2-conductor wire to the light fixture white, and to the white of the new 3-conductor cable. Connect the black of the 2-conductor to the black of the 3-conductor. Connect the red to the black lead from the light fixture.

In the double box (switch box), connect the black and red to the two screws on the switch. Also pigtail the black to the gold screw on the GFI receptacle. Connect the white to the silver screw on the GFI.

Connect the bare copper ground to the boxes (if metal), to the green screw on the GFI, and to the green screw on your light fixture.

Nate

Buff 05-15-2007 05:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J187 (Post 45103)
Meaning that there are no other wires entering the box on the wall, just those that from the track? So the wires on the left are the only wires that show power?

Correct.


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