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suprvee 09-30-2010 08:43 PM

Bathroom Exhaust Fan Wired to Existing Light Fixture?
 
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My bathroom doesn't have an exhaust fan; so I'll be wiring one up. Am I allowed to wire it inline with my current light (ie, daisy chain)? I've attached a screenshot to give you guys an idea of what I'm thinking about doing.

Red Squirrel 09-30-2010 09:05 PM

I can't see why not, I've seen this done a lot, especially in hotels. There might be some new code or something, but I don't think so.

The only thing is that you then have the fan on even if you're just going for a #1. Depending on how accessible things are, may be worth just running wire and adding another switch. Can even get one of those 1 gang double switches if you don't want to change the size of the box.

frenchelectrican 09-30-2010 09:47 PM

It been done all the time as long the luminaire junction box have room for more conductors.

You can expore couple options when you snake in new cable in you can have fan and light on seperted switch { either single or two gang depending on the numbers of conductors in the switch box }

There are few state codes may really raise up the issue if you have no window in bathroom you must have exhaust fan installed.

Merci.
Marc

WillK 10-01-2010 07:45 AM

Following your diagram, your fan's wires would go into your junction box for the light and you'd pigtail all the wires going into the light so you'd wirenut together a wire from the switch, a wire to your light and a wire to your fan. As long as the box is big enough for all that wire, it should be okay.

I'd also be one to prefer the 2 switches because really to remove moisture, you're supposed to leave the fan on for at least 15 minutes, and during that time you don't need the light on - and I often tend to leave the fan on and not come back for longer...

Michael Thomas 10-01-2010 08:31 AM

There are light also switches that run the fan for a programmable time delay after the light switch shuts off, for example:

www.aircycler.com/Literature/SmartExcutsheet.pdf

though to use them you have to be able to run the fan's wiring back to the switch.

WillK 10-02-2010 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michael Thomas (Post 509766)
There are light also switches that run the fan for a programmable time delay after the light switch shuts off, for example:

www.aircycler.com/Literature/SmartExcutsheet.pdf

though to use them you have to be able to run the fan's wiring back to the switch.

That looks really slick, but I couldn't help but expect it to come with a price tag... $65 is what I found buying from them. I've read that it may be the smart thing to do to put a timer on your bathroom fan, and on the fan I'm putting in I've picked up a timer switch for $12. It forces me to put in a 2 gang box for it, but what I'm doing for now is on a budget so I'm happy with it.

But yeah, that is what I'd like if money was no object, and when I do the bigger 2nd floor remodel I'm definitely putting that on my wishlist, thanks!

Michael Thomas 10-03-2010 06:35 AM

The thing about the manually activated timers is, people have to remember to use use them.:) It not unusual for me to be called in to identify the source of a "roof leak" at a top floor bathroom, only to find that it's condensation above a shower caused by occupants not turning on the fan.

downunder 10-03-2010 09:49 AM

I did that maybe 25 years ago. Besides having the venting benefit, I knew when the kids were in there playing in the sink or something because I could hear the fan running. That's the main reason I didn't use separate switches. You gotta get one over on them when you can!:thumbup:


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