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Old 06-02-2013, 08:44 PM   #1
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Hi everyone,

I am re-wiring a half bath and the full bathroom which is directly on top. The half bath will have a GFCI socket, a light & fan. The full bath above will have 2 GFCI sockets, a light & fan, and a vanity light. I ran 12/3 from the panel to the half bath with the idea of using the 1 hot (red) for the half bath and the other hot (black) for the full bath upstairs. Based on advice on previous threads if multiple blow dryers etc are plugged in.

I based the wiring of the GFCI off the following diagram from the book.




Here is a a drawing of the circuit I created.



How does it look guys?

PS Is it correct to assume that all light housing boxes are metal? I ask because in the black and decker book I see that the green wire (the ground) is always screwed into a box. That makes sense for the light housing boxes but if you are using plastic boxes for the switches you wouldn't screw it in.

Thoughts comments? As you can see from the above drawing, I will be using the black hot for upstairs bath and the red hot for the downstairs. The neutral will be shared path back to the panel.

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Old 06-02-2013, 09:01 PM   #2
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Personally, lighting on the same circuit as your bedroom lighting, outlet on its own dedicated, unless you have a second bath, then you can share the two on the same circuit, or have one gfci serve the other bath.

The reason of having lighting on the other lighting circuit, is that if the gfci trips, or say a breaker for the outlets in that room trips, you still have lights to see by.

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Old 06-02-2013, 09:09 PM   #3
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Your diagram will not work. You will always have an imbalance on the neutral at the first GFI anytime you are using power on the black circuit.

Pigtail the lighting off the LINE side of the GFI. Then run a 12/2 from the GFI box with all the neutrals pigtailed to the LINE side of the GFI.
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Old 06-02-2013, 10:55 PM   #4
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


You can leave the load terminals empty on the GFCI receptacle unit shown and connect the respective wires to the line terminals (using pigtails). Then the rest of the diagram can be left unchanged.
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Old 06-03-2013, 03:00 AM   #5
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Thanks for the feedback so far guys!

Gregzoll, that makes sense to not want the lights to go out if the GFCI is popped.

k_buz, I revised the diagram but still used 12/3 after the GFCI. I think this is also what AllanJ mean't.

I also realized I made a slight error in my original drawing. I actually have 12/2 running to the upstairs bathroom and not 12/3.

Revised drawing: (Also noted the load and line terminals on the GFCI)
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Old 06-03-2013, 11:16 AM   #6
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


You show these circuits originating from a "20 amp fuse". You will need two 20A breakers, installed on opposite buses ("phases") with the handles tied together (a multi-wire branch circuit).
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Old 06-03-2013, 03:10 PM   #7
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


HouseHelper,

Thanks for pointing that out. Book doesn't even mention that. I looked up a multi-wire branch circuit. That part about the handles being tied together, could you expand on that?

I comped up a diagram of what the return 12/3 will look like from what I just read.



Does everything, including this piece, look good to go?
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Old 06-03-2013, 03:45 PM   #8
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Quote:
Originally Posted by cloves View Post
HouseHelper,
That part about the handles being tied together, could you expand on that?
So that both breakers trip when a fault occurs on only one of them. If both did not trip and only one did, a person working on the circuit that tripped could still be shocked by current on the neutral.
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Old 06-03-2013, 04:06 PM   #9
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I have some 20amp fuses that have 2 handles linked to each other, is this what you guys are referring to as a handle tie? If that is this case (not sure) how would one go about adding a handle tie to 2 hots that are different sides of the bus?
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Old 06-03-2013, 05:37 PM   #10
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Quote:
Originally Posted by cloves View Post
I have some 20amp fuses that have 2 handles linked to each other, is this what you guys are referring to as a handle tie? If that is this case (not sure) how would one go about adding a handle tie to 2 hots that are different sides of the bus?
breakers on top of each other on the same side of the panel are each on different phases. So the handle ties would attach to breakers "on top" of each other.

Last edited by hammerlane; 06-03-2013 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 06-03-2013, 05:49 PM   #11
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Here is a photo of a Siemens panel. Note how breakers "A" and "B" are affixed to different buses . Note the configuration of the buses.
Attached Thumbnails
Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing-100_4909.jpg  

Last edited by hammerlane; 06-03-2013 at 05:51 PM.
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:04 PM   #12
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Quote:
Originally Posted by cloves View Post
Revised drawing: (Also noted the load and line terminals on the GFCI)


Hey Cloves please tell me how you made and uploaded this diagram. It looks good. Did you use a specific program? Thanks.
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:38 PM   #13
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Bathroom Electrical Circuit Drawing


Thanks for the visual hammer! I see now, the slots maybe on top of each other but each socket is on a different bus. I will take a close look tomorrow.

Ok so based on everything that has been discussed. I need to get a "20 Amp Two-Pole Circuit Breaker" like this:



The Multiwire Branch Circuit drawing connection at the fuse panel should look like this:



Final circuit design should look like this:


crescere, I created this in adobe illustrator, im a designer in the day

If all above looks good and there are no more changes, I'd like to thank everyone for helping me figure this out! I have 2 books and none of them covered a multiwire branch circuit. Maybe its wiser to just use 12/2 for each circuit in the future.

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