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Old 02-25-2012, 02:12 PM   #16
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Basement Recessed Lighting


If there is an amperage rating on the fixtures, use that. If there is only a max. wattage you don't use that. The code doesn't give you a number of fixtures you can use because they don't care if the circuit trips because the circuit is protected. That's why there's requirements on wire size(14 on 15A). As long as the wire is protected at the correct amperage rating there's no safety issue. You don't need to speculate what someone could do in the future. Figure out what your load will be, then if it's going to be on for 3 hrs. or more you need to compensate for continuous duty(ex. 15A * 80%=12A max.). If you needed to speculate as to what some could do in the future you could only put one receptacle on a circuit because you could max out the circuit by plugging one thing in.

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Old 02-25-2012, 03:46 PM   #17
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Okay, I have a new idea. What if I wire 14 of the lights (75Wx14=1050W) with the 9 receptacles I already have down there on a separate 20A circuit. That would leave me with only 12 lights (75Wx12=900W) & 3 receptacles on a 15A circuit. Does that work?
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Old 02-25-2012, 03:53 PM   #18
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As long as the wiring is 12 gauge you could use the 20 amp breaker. If it is only #14 you could only use a 15 amp breaker.
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Old 02-25-2012, 03:58 PM   #19
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Sounds like a good idea. Not sure where you get 75 watts for your calculation though.
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Old 02-25-2012, 04:02 PM   #20
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Also it depends on what you are planning on plugging into the receptacles. It's legal, but if you're planning on plugging very much in you could potentially have problems with the circuit tripping.
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Old 02-25-2012, 10:42 PM   #21
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Basement Recessed Lighting


Quote:
Originally Posted by EMeis1114 View Post
Sounds like a good idea. Not sure where you get 75 watts for your calculation though.
If he was refering to the recessed luminaire then it sound about right for indoor useage ( IC verison the non IC verison will have higher rating otherwise stated in the label )

Now for the track I know some are rated for 2400 watts but they key issue what I used from commercal side I always go 150 watts per foot so like example we have 15 foot track so we can go up much as 2250 watts so this is a example but not the actual figures due the residentail side they have little more leeway with wattage rating than commercal side.

so that should help you with it.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 02-26-2012, 07:44 AM   #22
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@Jim, I looked in one of the boxes and it is 12g. @EM, 75W / bulb. I will have a TV, a laptop, CFL or LED desk lamp - I think mostly low draw items but occasionally I'll have to vacuum with the lights out! @French, the MAX listed rating is 75W on the recessed lights - they will replace the track idea (and my wife will be happy!) They are listed as IC (Insulation Contact.)

Now, I am studying schematics because I currently have 4 tracks wired to 5 switches on the same 15A circuit. I will be maintaining switches but changing the power supply for 3 of the tracks to the 20A circuit. When that wiring is done and the correct lights are controlled by the correct switches and turned off by the correct breaker, I will then disconnect the tracks and wire 4 or so lamps to each former track location. I think I will just be wiring them 'in a line' so to speak.

Thanks to all of you for all the help on that part! Now, we'll see how many questions I have about the wiring!!

Last edited by csipe1; 02-26-2012 at 07:45 AM. Reason: wanted to add a thanks!
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Old 02-26-2012, 08:19 AM   #23
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Okay, I just keep running into problems in my mind - I've barely touched a wire! If I move some of the cans to the 20A, then the entire switching part of the circuit needs to be rewired to 12 gauge - is that correct?!

If so, here are some thoughts.

1. Switch out the 20A for a 15A breaker and just have 12g & 14g wire in there but then I have a lot of receptacles on a 15A circuit.

2. Or, is it possible to take out the fat 15A circuit breaker and replace it with 2 skinny ones? Some of the circuits in the box seem to have that. I've attached a picture in case the words fat and skinny are incorrect...
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Old 02-26-2012, 09:40 AM   #24
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Your panel needs to be rated for those tandem breakers or you can't use them. Don't go by the fact that there are already tandems in there....

Also, I believe they make LED cans. Check with CREE lighting. These are actual LED fixtures that would be rated at 12-18W.
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:05 AM   #25
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They do make those LED lights. They cost an arm and a leg but if an electrician is more - maybe I'll do that. Thanks.
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:50 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csipe1
They do make those LED lights. They cost an arm and a leg but if an electrician is more - maybe I'll do that. Thanks.
If you do the math the led cans are only around 20 more than a normal one. I put some in and love them.
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Old 02-26-2012, 11:20 AM   #27
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There are LED cans available. And they're rather attractive once you look at all the specs and compare the price to building your own can / housing / bulb / ring / etc. I just used five 4" LED cans in my library project.

Home Depot sells Lithonia Light brand in 3" ($50 - 7.5w, 345 lum), 4" ($55 - 8.7w, 400 lum) and 5" ($60 - 15w, 600 lum) models. All sizes are dimmable to 15% before blinking, they're IC-rated, airtight, and rated for damp locations. They use a special connector, not a bulb socket, so you couldn't install incadescenct / halogen in them even in you wanted to, meaning the wattages you see above are probably their "max rated", at least as far as I can tell. I'm not a code jockey, so that requires verification.

I compared using CFLs w/ a non-IC rated can installed in an IC-rated housing to get a similar effect and came out saving only about $7 per can once I figured in the ring, appropriate bulb, etc. It wasn't worth it for me to build my own set. Plus, these LED cans are a whole lot smaller than a big, 'ol IC-rated housing that I'd have to install between the ceiling joists, I didn't have to take a big piece of drywall down to install them, they can be installed from below (my situation was special and required attic access because of some design features I went with in the library unit) and they come with the legs to retrofit onto existing drywall. The only downside was that I wanted a gimbal-type swivel like you can get with the Halogens and that wasn't available, but I haven't looked back. I figure the $7 will earn itself back in energy savings in a year or two.

Some photos...













Hope that helps. Throwing a few extra $$ at the can could save a couple hours of electrician labor.

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