Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-03-2008, 08:26 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 10
Share |
Default

Basement Bathroom Circuit design


Hi all,

I am in the planning stages of a basement bathroom addition. My question relates to the design of the curcuit. I know that each bathroom must be on its own 20A circuit. Is it okay to run 12/2 from the panel to a GFI outlet and then from that GFI to another outlet and then on to power a switch for the light and fan? The bathroom will be combined with the laundry area, which has its own circuit for the washer & dryer. The reason I ask is that I saw the post below on a different site:

In a given bathroom
  • On a per-bathroom and a per-lavatory basis
    • Without regard to the size of the bathroom (i.e., ½-bath, 3/4 –bath, etc.)
    • Without regard to how close one lavatory is to another
    • Without regard to whether the mount requires piercing a mirror, moving a rack, etc.
  • At least 1 dedicated, ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI, or GFI) shall be installed
    • Which circuit shall be rated 120V/20A and
    • Which receptacle shall be rated 120V/20A
    • Which installation shall be proximate to and within 3 linear feet of each bathroom lavatory and
  • This circuit shall be dedicated to that receptacle only and to no other application whatsoever
    • There shall be no branches in these dedicated circuits for fans, lights, heaters, or anything else, i.e., wire the rest separately
Thanks

drtpdee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2008, 09:30 AM   #2
Licensed Pro
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 1,508
Default

Basement Bathroom Circuit design


If you dedicate the circuit to just that bathroom, then you can have the receptacles and the lights/fan on the same circuit. You need to have a GFCI protected receptacle within 3ft of the outside edge of the lavatory.

Unless the light/fan is within a shower area and requires GFCI protection, I would run the circuit to the switch first, then to the receptacle. That way a tripped GFCI will not put you in the dark.

And the receptacle does not need to be a 20A, a 15A will do.

HouseHelper is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2008, 09:55 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 10
Default

Basement Bathroom Circuit design


It is just for that bathroom. When you mention within 3 feet of the outside edge, what do you mean?
drtpdee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2008, 10:03 AM   #4
Licensed Pro
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 1,508
Default

Basement Bathroom Circuit design


Quote:
Originally Posted by drtpdee View Post
It is just for that bathroom. When you mention within 3 feet of the outside edge, what do you mean?
I mean that the receptacle has to be located adjacent to the sink, within 3ft of the edge. If you have two sinks, a receptacle has to be located within 3ft of each sink. Usually a receptacle mounted between the two will satisfy this.

Last edited by HouseHelper; 01-03-2008 at 10:06 AM.
HouseHelper is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2008, 10:05 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 10
Default

Basement Bathroom Circuit design


If the one near the sink edge that I install is an outlet that is downstream from the GFCI outlet but is wired so as to be protected by the GFCI outlet, would that be acceptable? Or, does the actual GFCI outlet need to be the one next to the sink?
drtpdee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2008, 10:09 AM   #6
Licensed Pro
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SC
Posts: 1,508
Default

Basement Bathroom Circuit design


Quote:
Originally Posted by drtpdee View Post
If the one near the sink edge that I install is an outlet that is downstream from the GFCI outlet but is wired so as to be protected by the GFCI outlet, would that be acceptable? Or, does the actual GFCI outlet need to be the one next to the sink?
The requirement is that it be GFCI protected; there is no requirement that it be a GFCI receptacle. The actual GFCI can be anywhere in the bathroom (except in the tub/shower area) or a GFCI breaker.
HouseHelper is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2008, 10:10 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 10
Default

Basement Bathroom Circuit design


Thanks. I'm actually only putting in a 1/2 bath/laundry combo:

pedestal sink
laundry tub/basin
toilet

recessed can
vanity light
fan

Very helpful. Thanks!

drtpdee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wiring in New Addition? sandyman720 Electrical 6 11-27-2011 03:34 PM
Redmodeling basement bathroom amakarevic Plumbing 5 04-23-2007 08:36 PM
basement bathroom heat ktrehs HVAC 3 03-12-2007 03:23 PM
Wiring Design Considerations Question tjandt Electrical 6 09-26-2006 05:44 AM
Basement Bathroom Tiling Question KUIPORNG Flooring 1 07-22-2006 11:03 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.