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-   -   Baseboards Stolen by Scrappers (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/baseboards-stolen-scrappers-168997/)

imautoparts 01-13-2013 01:05 PM

Baseboards Stolen by Scrappers
 
Hi all, I'm starting a project for a landlord friend who had a whole house of baseboards (9 of them) stolen by scrappers.

Most are 240v, a few are 120v. In most cases they cut the wires right at the wall - thus leaving no stubs for me to hook the new baseboards to.

What do you recommend? I hate the idea of installing junction boxes at each one simply for a 4" wire splice. Are there any other options that are safe and legal?

bbo 01-13-2013 01:08 PM

Are you allowed to work on electrical on a home you don't own in your area?

my recommendation would be to run new wire.

joecaption 01-13-2013 01:09 PM

Run all new wires.

Billy_Bob 01-13-2013 01:17 PM

If the wires are run horizontally in the wall, perhaps you could shift the heaters to the left or right a foot and pull the wire out of the wall there? Might have some drywall patching to do.

Or place junction boxes in attic / crawl space if wires come from there. Run new wire up/down to heater.

As for these scrappers... Some states now have laws that all metal recycling businesses must be shown picture ID's, copies of that made, and checks sent in the mail to pay for the scrap (cash payment not allowed). Records kept of all this. So then when something is stolen, police have a couple of ways of tracking down the thief! Might want to write your state lawmakers and suggest they do this as well.

imautoparts 01-13-2013 03:00 PM

That seems the most logical solution. In cases where I can't go left or right to acess any additional wire (if the wire runs straight down for instance), I guess the cheapest choice would be a junction box as close as I can get to the point of the cutoff, then new romex into the baseboard junctions.

It's a cheap rental unit so safety is the issue, not cosmetics. Every wall in this place already has plenty of holes as it sat empty and open for a while.

To answer the question about working on a property not my own - yes, I should have to pass the test first. I'm currently studying, but I'm months or perhaps a year away from being ready. This home is being done by a friend of mine and to be honest it is better for the home and future renters if I perform the installs to some kind of standard vs him trying to do it himself... he's a framer by trade, and I've seen his wiring before (ouch).

imautoparts 01-13-2013 03:05 PM

edit.

Billy_Bob 01-13-2013 05:20 PM

If you are studying to be an electrician, one valuable lesson to learn is to always do work safely and right or not at all. Some customers want things done half-a$$ed or on the cheap. If the work can't be done right and safely, say no - your name is on that work!

And if it is work which will not last due to poor quality or being "temporary", they will be quick to call you back a year later and insist it be fixed for no charge! (Not necessarily electrical, but say mounting something with duct tape instead of using proper screws.) Then having to go back costs you with time wasted.

rjniles 01-13-2013 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Billy_Bob (Post 1092695)
If you are studying to be an electrician, one valuable lesson to learn is to always do work safely and right or not at all. Some customers want things done half-a$$ed or on the cheap. If the work can't be done right and safely, say no - your name is on that work!

And if it is work which will not last due to poor quality or being "temporary", they will be quick to call you back a year later and insist it be fixed for no charge! (Not necessarily electrical, but say mounting something with duct tape instead of using proper screws.) Then having to go back costs you with time wasted.

He is studying to be a handyman and is doing electrical work for others for pay. Read his other posts.

Billy_Bob 01-13-2013 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 1092702)
He is studying to be a handyman and is doing electrical work for others for pay. Read his other posts.

I'll take your word for it!

(In my state at least, that is a big no no!)

imautoparts 01-13-2013 06:43 PM

Yes, I'm stepping into the "handyman" arena - concentrating on anything that has a heating element in it. Since this covers everything from driers to wall heaters to ceiling radiant, it seemed a rational range of work to pursue.

My interest is also personal - I own an all-electric home with lots of unique features as it was a reddy-kilowatt show home.

Like most communities much of the work is done without formal permits - especially by landlords and DIY homeowners. I'm trying to abide by code and standards as I study to get my formal license. I have a licensed electrician that helps me with pretty much every job so far. Frankly, he's not quite as persnickety as I am when push comes to shove - but he's a young guy.

I also admit to leaning hard on this DIY forum as I make my first halting steps into this new field. I have no illusions - this will be a steep learning curve, and it will require both study and experience. But hey, I'm 53 and retired - and my doctor says that if I don't get busy I'm going to get sick and die.

I don't know if this information matters, but I want you all to know I read every reply with the eager desire to learn and apply what I learn.

rrolleston 01-14-2013 02:28 PM

If the walls are already damaged might as well finish them off and replace the wire. I would feel more comfortable with new with my name on it.

bbo 01-14-2013 03:58 PM

so what happens if now a fire starts due to something amiss in one of the baseboard heaters.

I'm guessing you are now liable and insurance will not pay since you are not a licensed electrician. as will your friend be liable. Unless you can get a licensed electrician to sign off on the work.

am I correct here Electrician members?

jbfan 01-14-2013 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbo (Post 1093480)
so what happens if now a fire starts due to something amiss in one of the baseboard heaters.

I'm guessing you are now liable and insurance will not pay since you are not a licensed electrician. as will your friend be liable. Unless you can get a licensed electrician to sign off on the work.

am I correct here Electrician members?

Depends on the laws of his state.
Some states do not require a license to do electrical work, nor do they require inspections.

Liability rolls down hill, but to be sure any one from the last several owners to the last person through the door would be named.

timmay5309 01-14-2013 08:32 PM

I would run new wire as well. Seems when the "scrappers" steal things, they yank on the wires to get things out quickly. Who knows what damage lies underneath....

parman 01-14-2013 09:59 PM

Run new wire.

Also, I hope your jurisdiction allows an unlicensed person doing electrical work in a residence that is being rented.

You will find out the very hard way that doing unlicensed electrical work is not a good idea if any of your past or future work is even remotely questioned due to a problem and or accident.

And don't be delusional that your friends will keep quite. As soon as lawyers and lawsuits start flying around, you will be given up by them freely.

Your career as a handyman will be cut very short.


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