Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-13-2009, 09:13 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 173
Share |
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


Hello all,
I am looking at buying an old house (from 1907). I'm pretty sure the house has much of the original plumbing and electrical, although it was renovated in 1920. The house is 2 stories with a basement (unfurnished) and has 1.5 baths, with the full bath on the second floor. It is roughly 2000 sq ft. The seller's disclosure notes that there has been leaks and frozen pipes in the past. There is also no current running to the half-bath downstairs. In the basement, the ceiling (wood and plaster) has numerous patches, likely from old leaks. There are some old wires with old light bulb sockets exposed on that ceiling.

I really like the house and location, but I know I will have to likely redo all the plumbing and electrical. I may have to add another bathroom upstairs. Before spending a lot of time and energy investing in this property, I want to make sure the selling price is reasonable considering all the work that will have to be done, and I want to know where to ball-park my offers.

Can anyone give me a ball-park estimate for how much it would cost to re-wire a house, likely installing a new box? The house is in Saint Louis.

Thanks!
gbwillner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 04:11 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 9,519
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


It would be easier to guess your weight.
Call in local electricians and get estimates. You'll also need to call in guys to fix all the holes.
Ron
Ron6519 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 04:58 AM   #3
Lic. Builder/GC/Remodeler
 
AtlanticWBConst.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 7,556
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


As stated,

A ballpark price over the internet will get you within $100K of cost. There are far more factors/concerns that have to be looked at, beyond the age and sf of a dwelling.

Get some qualified electrical bids from people actually looking at the house and the real-time physical conditions.
AtlanticWBConst. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 06:11 AM   #4
Member
 
Bigplanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 474
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
Get some qualified electrical bids from people actually looking at the house and the real-time physical conditions.
Pay the extra for a company that does high quality work. Avoid the low bid. Try to find a contractor who specializes in renovating older homes, and ask to see examples of his/her work. Good luck. Reminds me of that movie "The Money Pit."
Bigplanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 06:43 AM   #5
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,682
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron6519 View Post
It would be easier to guess your weight.


Great analogy.


gbwillner, an educated guess with a 60% margin of error I would say around $35k.

Also, have the basement ceiling completely removed. Then do all the mechanical work. Then have it replaced instead of repaired.
The mechanical contractors will wind up having to rip most of it out anyway and they will allow for it in their bids. Have it removed before anyone comes to look at the jobs.
This way you can have it done by a laborer, pay less for it and it will let the guys bidding have a MUCH clearer view of things.
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.
Speedy Petey is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 07:06 AM   #6
rwa
Member
 
rwa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Mansfield, Texas
Posts: 48
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


4 runs, 6 hits, no errors, 2 men left on base ...
rwa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 09:34 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 173
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post


Great analogy.


gbwillner, an educated guess with a 60% margin of error I would say around $35k.

Also, have the basement ceiling completely removed. Then do all the mechanical work. Then have it replaced instead of repaired.
The mechanical contractors will wind up having to rip most of it out anyway and they will allow for it in their bids. Have it removed before anyone comes to look at the jobs.
This way you can have it done by a laborer, pay less for it and it will let the guys bidding have a MUCH clearer view of things.

Thanks everyone for your help. I will call around. If it is around 35K, I have to allow for plumbing and account for that in my bid... so thanks again.
gbwillner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 12:04 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,294
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


Here's a tip.

Even if the bones are good, a house that old needs to be refinished.

The money spent stripping it down to the studs will be recouped with the savings from the plumbing and electrical. The work is now "new construction" and will be easier to bid and complete. It will also allow you to take care of other hidden issues.

You will of course have to drywall/paint/moulding but everything will be new and dirt/mold free.
220/221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 05:21 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NW of D.C.
Posts: 5,990
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


RS Means publishes books on labor rates, corrected for ZIP code.

With all the unknowns you should take a WAG at the highest $ you'd have to pay and how likely it is that you'd end up paying it.

Also decide what constitutes fatal flaws such that you wouldn't buy the house at any price. Precise measurements and tests might point out some of these ahead of time. You might want to spend quite a bit to get this info
". . .the expected value of perfect information (EVPI) is the price that one would be willing to pay in order to gain access to perfect information [about this house]."

A house like this might have a high cost of ownership over time, in addition to the upfront money you're paying.

Watch out for this trap
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunk_cost
it can be a slippery slope.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 05-14-2009 at 05:35 PM.
Yoyizit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2009, 11:08 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 173
Default

Ballpark figure for new electrical?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
RS Means publishes books on labor rates, corrected for ZIP code.

With all the unknowns you should take a WAG at the highest $ you'd have to pay and how likely it is that you'd end up paying it.

Also decide what constitutes fatal flaws such that you wouldn't buy the house at any price. Precise measurements and tests might point out some of these ahead of time. You might want to spend quite a bit to get this info
". . .the expected value of perfect information (EVPI) is the price that one would be willing to pay in order to gain access to perfect information [about this house]."

A house like this might have a high cost of ownership over time, in addition to the upfront money you're paying.

Watch out for this trap
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunk_cost
it can be a slippery slope.

Interesting. Can't say I didn't learn something new today.
gbwillner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Just for fun Andy in ATL Electrical 56 10-20-2009 09:33 AM
Electrical Engineer allowed to do Electrical work? SarahJennifer Electrical 48 09-21-2009 08:15 PM
Electrical Box near Shower Valve dasajame Electrical 3 07-07-2008 06:46 AM
2 Prong Electrical mjcongleton Electrical 10 04-16-2008 08:59 AM
DIY electrical work questions for finishing a basement. mac41099 Electrical 7 11-16-2007 07:59 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.