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Old 01-28-2009, 09:35 AM   #16
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


With a cordless drill it also helps to put it in low gear if it has two or three speed ranges. My Ridgids and DeWalts will easily and quickly drive a 1" auger in low gear but can't get it through 2x dimension lumber in 2nd gear.

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Old 01-28-2009, 09:36 AM   #17
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


I've been using Irwin Ship Auger (http://www.irwin.com/irwin/consumer/...rwinProd100163) bits for about 10-15 years. I also tried the Greenlee, but went back to Irwin. Despite the company's claims, eventually nails take their toll and the bits need to be resharpened. I've used a Craftsman 1/2" (when I first started out), then had a Dewalt for several years and now have a Bosch that I'm very impressed with. Business has been slow as of late, so I'm not drilling as many holes as I'd like. Hopefully things wil pick up in the spring and I'll get a better feel for the Bosch.
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Old 01-28-2009, 10:47 AM   #18
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Personally I'd get a 1". It'll make your pulls a lot easier than a 3/4".
KC;
Do you have any concerns what so ever about drilling 1" holes from a structural stand point? I like using larger holes, much easier to work with. My dad is very concerned about the structural impact of these holes. From what I have read, it's normally not a problem at all and I have drill many of them. However he has a much older house and we are drilling through very think beams, 4x8, 4x10, etc. Is there any reason at all for him to be concerned about us popping in 1" holes as necessary for running wires?

Thanks
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Old 01-28-2009, 10:49 AM   #19
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
This are the only bits that I have been able to use with a cordless drill to go thru studs, including double plates. These are Irwin Speedbor Max.



A three pack was about $15 with a 5/8, 3/4 and a 7/8 or 1".
These bits work very well.
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Old 01-28-2009, 10:57 AM   #20
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


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These bits work very well.
Do NOT try to ream out a smaller hole to a larger one with those bits. They work very well for quite a good number of hoes before they get dull. imo they are trash once bent or if they hit concrete or brick... But I suppose most have that problem.
We have been going through wood and concrete with a masonary bit with the Te5 Hitlie and it goes right through both.

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Old 01-28-2009, 11:48 AM   #21
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Jamie, I believe the code is no bigger than 1/3 of the lumber. So a 1" hole in a 3 1/2" stud would be fine. You shouldn't be worried about a 1" hole in a 4x8 beam. I'm sure termite will give the official word but I remember reading 1/3 somewhere.
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Old 01-28-2009, 01:06 PM   #22
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


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Old 01-28-2009, 02:44 PM   #23
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Jamie, Gigs' diagram is right on for joists and rafters. The 1/3 thing does not apply to studs. For studs, you can drill up to 40% of the stud's width (2x4, 2x6, etc). You can go to 60% on a doubled stud, but can't overdrill consective studs and double them up to get away with it. The hole cannot be any closer than 5/8" to the edge or the stud is considered to be overdrilled.

Top plates can be drilled or notched up to 50% of their width without requiring structural reinforcement.

Your dad's concerns are responsible, and every effort should be made to minimize the amount of holes and the size of the holes. However, 3" holes are just fine in 2x10's and don't reduce the structural integrity in any way.

Drilling beams and headers that carry tributary loads from other parts of the structure should be limited whenever possible. In most cases you can do it without any problem, and the code does allow it.

LVL, PSL, glulam, and I-joists should be drilled in accordance with their respective manufacturers' specifications. Code does not apply. With trusses, a good rule of thumb is to assume that they cannot be drilled.

Where you can really get into trouble and compromise the structure...In my opinion...Is by cutting square holes or square notches in joists and rafters. Although the code allows notches up to 25% of a joist's depth, the loads transfer to the inside corners of the notch and weaken the member. Round holes or rounded notches are always better from a structural standpoint.
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Old 01-28-2009, 05:22 PM   #24
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Remember to grip that drill tight. Different bits with different pitch might give the wrist a twist that you're not ready for.
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Old 01-28-2009, 05:35 PM   #25
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


We only use augers/angle drill when we have to drill more than a dozen or so holes.

You KNOW it when you hit a nail with a spade bit. Well.....you should know it. I have yelled at more than one knucklehead when I heard it from the other room.

We do a lot of remodel work and go thru a lot of spade bits. The long ones (16"??) are very useful.

My tip is to use only as big of a spade as you need. One cable will fit easily thru a 1/2" hole and the drilling/battery use is much easier.

We use the 1 1/8" augers on an angle drill. We use the 18" long augers if there is a lot of top plate drilling to be done so I can do it without a ladder.
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Old 01-28-2009, 06:25 PM   #26
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Most of my work where I have to bore normally augar bit will work just fine in most case and I have both short and long one.

Not too long ago one of my frenid used speed flatblade bit and he only manged get about 1/3 holes bored out before the bit got too hot and dulled out and once you hit the nail with flatblade bit ya pretty much done with it.

With augar bits I don't recall how many time I hit 16d yes 16d and 20d nails with hevey duty right angle drill and few case I actally wrapped nail on my augar bit .

Yes I do have few size on hand but for most common size normally 9/16 for romex's or LV cables for other size I used trade size as called for and few case some spots you will have to pull out the holesaw for more stubbon task.

{ side note the 18 inch auger bit I have it and still good for 20 years with alot of hard useage }

Merci,Marc
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:00 PM   #27
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Quote:
Originally Posted by 47_47 View Post
These bits work very well.
So, you think the Irwin is better than a Greenlee? The Greenlee 18" will cost me $22 at HD. Maybe that's a bit too much for one drill bit.
I'm really just looking for something that can handle a nail once in a while.

I am not using a cordless drill. Mine is the DeWalt DW235G, 1/2".
I always use the side handle, and have not had any problems controlling the drill. I have good wrists and forearms, and quick reflexes<g>

FW
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:08 PM   #28
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
This are the only bits that I have been able to use with a cordless drill to go thru studs, including double plates. These are Irwin Speedbor Max.



A three pack was about $15 with a 5/8, 3/4 and a 7/8 or 1".
I see that bit has the quik-change shaft. That would work nicely with my 16" extension.

FW
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Old 01-28-2009, 09:35 PM   #29
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


I like the greenlee nail eater bits. I have bought other auger bits, can't remember the names but noticed a big improvement in the greenlee. I do know the Irwin spade bits are a quality bit so maybe their augers are good also.
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Old 01-30-2009, 12:15 PM   #30
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Auger bits last longer than spade bits?


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Jamie, Gigs' diagram is right on for joists and rafters. The 1/3 thing does not apply to studs. For studs, you can drill up to 40% of the stud's width (2x4, 2x6, etc). You can go to 60% on a doubled stud, but can't overdrill consective studs and double them up to get away with it. The hole cannot be any closer than 5/8" to the edge or the stud is considered to be overdrilled.

Top plates can be drilled or notched up to 50% of their width without requiring structural reinforcement.

Your dad's concerns are responsible, and every effort should be made to minimize the amount of holes and the size of the holes. However, 3" holes are just fine in 2x10's and don't reduce the structural integrity in any way.

Drilling beams and headers that carry tributary loads from other parts of the structure should be limited whenever possible. In most cases you can do it without any problem, and the code does allow it.

LVL, PSL, glulam, and I-joists should be drilled in accordance with their respective manufacturers' specifications. Code does not apply. With trusses, a good rule of thumb is to assume that they cannot be drilled.

Where you can really get into trouble and compromise the structure...In my opinion...Is by cutting square holes or square notches in joists and rafters. Although the code allows notches up to 25% of a joist's depth, the loads transfer to the inside corners of the notch and weaken the member. Round holes or rounded notches are always better from a structural standpoint.
Thanks very much kc and gigs. All is going well and have not had to do too many holes but what I have done has been well within the guidelines you mentioned. In the basement we ran a lot of emf. And drop ceilings are going in also. I have been able to use a lot of the old knob holes in the attic to feed romex through. Drilli g some new with irwin auger and Milwaukee 1/2 drill. Thanks. Jamie

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