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mysterylectric 03-07-2011 09:41 AM

Any restrictions against twist-lock around water bath kitchen etc.
 
Got my 2011 softbound on order, figure it's about time I read The Bible....

Meanwhile I'm burning with curiosity: are there restrictions against the use of twist-lock outlets in situations where one might conceivably be saved by pulling the plug ie: near bathroom sinks, tubs, kitchens.

-Jeff

Jim Port 03-07-2011 09:43 AM

Not sure why you would want a twist lock when you will not find appliances with twist lock cords.

You would also need to provide GFI breakers instead of the much cheaper GFI receptacles.

AllanJ 03-07-2011 10:28 AM

Isn't the twist lock the 30 amp receptacle?

Common household lights and appliances may not be put on 30 amp circuits and therefore may not be equipped with 30 amp plugs.

J. V. 03-07-2011 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mysterylectric (Post 604357)
Got my 2011 softbound on order, figure it's about time I read The Bible....

Meanwhile I'm burning with curiosity: are there restrictions against the use of twist-lock outlets in situations where one might conceivably be saved by pulling the plug ie: near bathroom sinks, tubs, kitchens.

-Jeff

A code book will not help with this question as it does not list NEMA configuration charts. I am burning with curiosity to why you would need a twist lock in these locations. If you are in an industrial setting then I do understand and the answer is yes, but you must use GFCI protection.

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 604383)
Isn't the twist lock the 30 amp receptacle?

Common household lights and appliances may not be put on 30 amp circuits and therefore may not be equipped with 30 amp plugs.

No. Twist lock receptacles and plugs come in 15, 20 and 30 amp ratings.

mysterylectric 03-07-2011 12:29 PM

GFI I'm OK with. Looking at arc fault too.

Two entirely different goals:

1.) I want twist-lock in the kitchen to help drunk proof. I compare twist-lock to putting something on a high shelf,
just outside the reach of children: or adults reduced to a childlike state. Combo breakers are probably a given,
what's stopping me from twist-lock in residential kitchen setting please. Curious. An option. OK call it idiot proof.

2.) I want twist-lock on the back porch 'cause I'm tired of climbing back down the ladder
when my extension cords get yanked out. Ultimately I want to standardized all my medium
and heavy duty gear onto one standard, thinking generator standard: I've got a piece of 10/4 SOOW
about 100' long, have had to swap connectors a couple times and besides 100' of 10/4 is
HEAVY, want to break it into 2 50' pieces, twist lock together.... making sense? The cost of connectors is not bad
compared to what I have in the copper.

Borrowing ideas from construction trade and commercial installs, am I juuuuust asking for trouble....

I'll double check some things, do appreciate the 30A point and will look at that.

-Jeff

Jim Port 03-07-2011 12:35 PM

When you cut the cords off to install a twistlock plug you will void the UL listing. Also when you go the sell the house no one will want to adapt to your system and it will all need to be changed back.

I think there are more reasonable measures to "drunk proof" a house.

mysterylectric 03-07-2011 12:46 PM

Good point about voiding ul listing of appliances. I'll look into that.

mysterylectric 03-07-2011 01:12 PM

Curiouser and curiouser, the main appliances (1800 watt inductive) I want to support are listed "for commercial use only", despite the fact they have a common 15A cord/plug. The cord enters through a 1/2" KO and... SOOW type connector.

Now I know that just ain't right.

Ack, well, now my question has morphed into a general question about using commercial gear in a residence, I suppose. If I wire to commercial standards do I stand a chance?

-Jeff

J. V. 03-09-2011 11:39 AM

Jim, This guy is a troll or a hack. Lets not humor him anymore.

handy andy 03-09-2011 03:16 PM

Good Idea... But think it thru
 
Your idea about twist lock outlets sounds good until you think it thru. Then there are a lot of reasons it may not be so good!!! No appliances for residential use will have the plug ends you would need.

Probably a good idea for your outside outlets and workshop or garage. But not in the kitchen. Inevitably, you will get a new kitchen appliance and will not be able to use it unless you Change the cord or use a jumper!

If your concern is safety or idiot proofing, then GFCI breakers will be the simplest and cheapest solution.

mysterylectric 05-05-2011 10:01 PM

No JV, by definition what you're doing is trolling, in discouraging discussion and levying personal attacks. That's juts gross.

I'm pursuing this plan and looking forward to it. The chief advantage is that each of the four high wattage appliances will have one and exactly one outlet and private circuit. It won't be possible to connect two such appliances to one circuit.

frenchelectrican 05-05-2011 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mysterylectric (Post 642898)
No JV, by definition what you're doing is trolling, in discouraging discussion and levying personal attacks. That's juts gross.

I'm pursuing this plan and looking forward to it. The chief advantage is that each of the four high wattage appliances will have one and exactly one outlet and private circuit. It won't be possible to connect two such appliances to one circuit.

Not always the case if you ever see duplex twistlockers receptale IMO they are no better than straight blade receptales at all.

Just don't get into 240 volts kitchen appalinces at the moment due they are much larger than what you have in the household applainces are { I have dealt with commercal and European verison so I know what they look like }

Merci,
Marc

Saturday Cowboy 05-06-2011 12:32 AM

you would be far better not to do as you plan

Simbilis 05-06-2011 02:05 AM

This is one of those times when being clever and idiosyncratic really can't compete with the conventional wisdom. I hope you (begrudgingly) give up the idea before you spend the money and waste the effort.

Learn from the mistakes of others and don't deviate unnecessarily from what's expected - that's what the NEC is really trying to tell you.

Simbilis 05-06-2011 02:06 AM

Edit: double post


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