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ayoung 04-20-2005 11:58 AM

any real electricians out there
 
My problem is the 15 amp gfci keeps trippin everytime a plug something in the outlet and I was informed that I needed to switch it out with a single pole breaker. I need to know if you can switch a 15amp gfci with a square "d" (homeline) 15amp single pole breaker because I just tried it about 15 minutes ago and it did not work and if you can you can how?

jbfan 04-20-2005 01:10 PM

Are you saying you have a gfci breaker that won't stay on or do you have a gfci recepticale that won't stay on. If you have a breaker, then yoou need to keep that breaker a gfci, and you can not change it out for a standard breaker. If it is bad it needs to be replaced. What does this breaker control?

ayoung 04-20-2005 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan
Are you saying you have a gfci breaker that won't stay on or do you have a gfci recepticale that won't stay on. If you have a breaker, then yoou need to keep that breaker a gfci, and you can not change it out for a standard breaker. If it is bad it needs to be replaced. What does this breaker control?

It is a breaker and it controls the master bedroom and 1 other bedroom. And the only reason that I wanted to try it was because a electrician told me it would work. I tried it and it did. But please explain to me in details. Because after he explain it to me I thought it was ok.

Mike Swearingen 04-21-2005 01:52 AM

If you have a gfci breaker, then everything on that circuit is gfci protected.
If you have a gfci receptacle, then only it and any standard outlets past it in the same circuit will be gfci protected.
You don't need or want both a gfci breaker and a gfci receptacle, or mulitple gfci receptacles for that matter, on the same circuit. They will likely keep tripping each other.
If a gfci (breaker or receptacle) will not re-set after tripping, replace it with another new gfci whichever, because it is probably required by your local electrical code.
If you ever had a house fire because of improper wiring that wasn't to code whenever your home was built, you may not be able to collect on your homeowners insurance.
If a gfci circuit is not required in this instance (call your local Building Inspection Department to verify one way or the other), then you can replace it with a standard single pole breaker of the same size (15 amps only).
If that keeps tripping, you have a short somewhere in the circuit wiring connections, and it isn't a faulty gfci or standard breaker. Check out all connections from one end of the circuit to the other. The circuit itself is simply telling you that you have another problem if it keeps tripping with both types of breaker installed. It could be nothing more than a single loose wire somewhere. It may appear to be O.K. (it may not be completely loose), so check them all out thoroughly.
Good luck!
Mike

jbfan 04-21-2005 11:03 AM

How old is your house? Are you sure this is a gfci or is it an arkfault breaker. Gfci's are for kitchens, bathrrom, basements, garages, and outside. Arkfaults are for bedrooms.

ayoung 04-21-2005 05:28 PM

My house was built in 1915 but was recently gutted out. Therefore everything is brand new from electrical to plumbing. As stated before I have replaced the gfci and it has brought power to many more sockets throughout my home. And just so you know when the electrician came to my home he did state that it was out of code regulations. So I replaced the 15amp gfci with a regular 15amp singlepole square d homeline. But I still have a problem none of the sockets in my 2 bathrooms have power to them so I plan to further troubleshoot in the near future. Also no problems have occurred since I made the switch. So my question to you is should I be worried.

pipeguy 04-21-2005 06:05 PM

ayoung - The service panel, where circuit breakers reside, is a very dangerous place when the cover is removed. Please consider hiring a qualified electrician to diagnose and remedy the problems you are experiencing. Best of luck

Mike Swearingen 04-22-2005 12:06 PM

I agree with pipeguy, ayoung.
Only a very experienced electrical DIYer or an electrican should be going into the panel. The two legs at the top of the panel above the main breaker are always hot, even with the main breaker off, and either one can kill you if touched, or anything in the panel can, if the main breaker is faulty.
Your bathroom circuits should be on a gfci breaker or first receptacle to meet code. Your bedrooms should be on arc fault breakers.
If this home has recently been re-wired, it should be to current code. Changing anything may put it out of code.
Good luck!
Mike

boogie 04-22-2005 06:42 PM

if this is a gut job and a total rewire then the breaker in question feeding bedrooms should be a arc fault breaker. replace with like breaker if this keeps tripping then there is a problem with the circuit or something plugged into it
the technology with these new arc fault breaker being new some are bound to get thru quality control ive had to replace many .
but in my case it has been a simple exchange .
my suggestion definitly would be to put the arc fault back in and find the cause of the problem if not you an electrician it would be money well spent and shouldnt be too difficult to locate
have found times where it was as simple as a bed or dresser pushed too close to outlet and pinching cord
good luck


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