Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-08-2012, 01:32 AM   #16
Not a Noob or Boob
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Naperville, IL
Posts: 109
Share |
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
Another source of information is "ELECTRICAIN TALK"
They have a vintage electrical section,
Try posting your question on there !
There are a lot of the older electricains on there,
And they are a valuable source of information.
One of them is bound to know !
I would be careful there. It is designed for professional electricians. DIY or HO are not generally welcome. There are plenty of electricians who browse DIYCHATROOM, and will eventually be by to give there input. Be patient.

Rob1975 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 02:06 AM   #17
" Euro " electrician
 
frenchelectrican's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WI & France { in France for now }
Posts: 5,369
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Marc may be on to something. It's rated 250V, which has never been typical for branch circuits in American homes. It may well be European. Bryant was an American company, but they made wiring devices for worldwide use. Perhaps the wealthy homeowners had European appliances brought over, and had some circuits wired specifically for their use?

I could be wrong, but I didn't think the "250V" rating standard was all that old. I thought back in the day devices were rated for 110-115V and 220-230V, and the 125/250V ratings were a much more recent development. Could this perhaps not be as old as we are thinking?
I will give you a short and sweet answer the 250 volt rating was used in the set up way back in Edison day when they used the K&T circuits and they did have old DC system they ran pretty simauir voltage level as AC is now

( the old days IIRC they useally ran about 110 volts depending on the DC power plants and early AC plants as well but for the HZ rating there were more than half dozen HZ's but will save it for other time )

From time to time I will see the Bryant device do show up in European area

As far for the oddball floor receptale I know they did used in European area but for short while then went inverted verison which the pins are insluated not exposed like the oddball receptale posted in the OP's part.

Now for the last question about the European plugs there were so many differnt format many years ago but now pretty much standardized just like your side there were few differnt format but pretty much standardized now.

Sure there were few wealthy fella which they did bring the European appaliances back to the states side and may brought that device as well so that is one possiblty that can actually did happend many years ago.

Oh by the way mpoulton., If you are allready aware that we don't use the same plug / receptale format as you guys using we use the French format which it is a twin pin sleeve with earth pin exposed.

I will post our moden receptale to give you a idea



This one is a common on in France and it kinda pretty common over Germany as well but for UK that slowly comming up there but will save that for other time before it get off topic at the moment.

Hope that clear up some of the puzzle at the moment.

Merci,
Marc
__________________
The answer will be based on NEC ( National Electrical code ) or CEC ( Cananda Electrical code ) or ECF ( Electrique Code France )
frenchelectrican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 02:15 AM   #18
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 9
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
Another source of information is "ELECTRICAIN TALK"
They have a vintage electrical section,
Try posting your question on there !
There are a lot of the older electricains on there,
And they are a valuable source of information.
One of them is bound to know !
I was already there, and Pete shut the thread down. Dont know why, its not like I posted a common item asking questions that have easily obtainable answers.
If i was a "professional" electrician, and posted this, would it have been allowed? Point is, I've asked several trade electricians and nobody knows locally, so I really dont see how that wasnt on a level worthy of a "professional" forum. My major is a low-level Electrical Engineering program, so what do I know?

ok, rant over


Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
I think that the safety authorities would have fit !
If they saw that type of socket in use today !

But it is interesting none the less !
Hope you let us know when you find out ?
I will for sure. Assuming I find anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Marc may be on to something. It's rated 250V, which has never been typical for branch circuits in American homes. It may well be European. Bryant was an American company, but they made wiring devices for worldwide use. Perhaps the wealthy homeowners had European appliances brought over, and had some circuits wired specifically for their use?

I could be wrong, but I didn't think the "250V" rating standard was all that old. I thought back in the day devices were rated for 110-115V and 220-230V, and the 125/250V ratings were a much more recent development. Could this perhaps not be as old as we are thinking?
The imported appliance idea could be valid. But this stuff is definitely old. A few of them had bits of old cloth-covered wire attached to them. Interestingly, the plug that plugs into the socket has a plastic coating on it, leading me to think that whatever was getting plugged in got a cord replacement at some point. But because of the obviously dangerous design flaws, I would have to think that these are very primitive plugs. That, and the socket covers are REALLY heavy solid brass, which is exactly how all the other old switch plates that came out of the house are like.
NightBiker07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 07:49 AM   #19
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,810
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBiker07 View Post
I was already there, and Pete shut the thread down. Dont know why, its not like I posted a common item asking questions that have easily obtainable answers.
Well, like the disclaimer I posted over there, it is CLEARLY stated in the sign up page that the site if for electrical professionals only and no DIY type questions are allowed. We don't make exception based on the type of question it is. That would not be fair.

There is a reason that the owner of these sites has several different site formats. If you posted this to (the similarly "professional only") contractortalk.com you'd have probably gotten the same shut down.
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 10:36 AM   #20
Military Mom of 4
 
Snav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 974
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Marc may be on to something. It's rated 250V, which has never been typical for branch circuits in American homes. It may well be European. Bryant was an American company, but they made wiring devices for worldwide use. Perhaps the wealthy homeowners had European appliances brought over, and had some circuits wired specifically for their use?

I could be wrong, but I didn't think the "250V" rating standard was all that old. I thought back in the day devices were rated for 110-115V and 220-230V, and the 125/250V ratings were a much more recent development. Could this perhaps not be as old as we are thinking?
250V is common in some of the earliest US patented fixtures crafted.
__________________
At this present moment in time I am making cabinets for the kitchen - just in case you wanted to know what I'm doing when I'm not around.
Snav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 11:17 AM   #21
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 9
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Well, like the disclaimer I posted over there, it is CLEARLY stated in the sign up page that the site if for electrical professionals only and no DIY type questions are allowed. We don't make exception based on the type of question it is. That would not be fair.

There is a reason that the owner of these sites has several different site formats. If you posted this to (the similarly "professional only") contractortalk.com you'd have probably gotten the same shut down.
What separates a DIY question from a professional/contractor question?

I could have easily presented myself as a guy 30 years into the trade, if thats all you use to separate perceived "diy" questions is someone's word they are a pro.

I understand guys not wanting to answer noob questions all day long, I really do. Or if I would have asked what a common plug from the 60's was. But since most guys that have worked in the field for 30+ years have never seen these, I could easily see a "professional" posting the same thing.

I figured I need to find a older guy that has specialized in old electrical his whole life for any hope at an answer to this. It is apparently some design built well before standardization and is a plug that wasnt very popular whatsoever. Because of the "rich" nature of the house when it was built, I kind of assumed that it was the newest thing out at the time, and the builder took a chance at these plugs.
NightBiker07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 11:38 AM   #22
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 5,749
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by Julius793 View Post
Well how old are you guys cumon cough it up are you old enough to be my grandpa on even older??
If you are under 20 I could be!!

Of course that would mean I would have to start a litle early.

I'm gonna be a first time grandpa in march!
__________________
Yes I am a Pirate, 200 years too late. "Jimmy Buffett"
jbfan is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jbfan For This Useful Post:
Snav (01-08-2012)
Old 01-08-2012, 12:33 PM   #23
Military Mom of 4
 
Snav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 974
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Well - on the underside of your plate cover and the socket prongs is written "Bryant . . . Bryant EL (SC?) Co"

Bryant Electrical Company is a component manufacturing company here in the US - Waldo Bryant holds several patents (which I've looked at - none are yours in the OP)

Of course - being a manufacturing company not all of thei components were of their own inventions. . . eventually they came to produce over 4K products.

The main factory was located in Birmingham, Conecticuit - after expanding and acquiring Westinghouse in 1901 they changed venue.

Perhaps this explains the possible (faint) "WE" on your plate - "Made in _WE?_"
__________________
At this present moment in time I am making cabinets for the kitchen - just in case you wanted to know what I'm doing when I'm not around.
Snav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2012, 12:37 PM   #24
Member
 
Julius793's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New york
Posts: 1,053
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfan

If you are under 20 I could be!!

Of course that would mean I would have to start a litle early.

I'm gonna be a first time grandpa in march!
Congrats!
__________________
Electricity will kill you if you give it a chance
Julius793 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Julius793 For This Useful Post:
jbfan (01-08-2012)
Old 01-09-2012, 12:24 AM   #25
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: ontario canada
Posts: 22
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


ironically i found this on the vintage section of electricantalk:

http://www.electriciantalk.com/f24/v...28/#post276415

the image from above if you cant see it for some reason:
http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/c...al/1916TR2.jpg
RTypeEman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to RTypeEman For This Useful Post:
Snav (01-09-2012)
Old 01-09-2012, 12:44 AM   #26
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 9
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by RTypeEman View Post
ironically i found this on the vintage section of electricantalk:

http://www.electriciantalk.com/f24/v...28/#post276415

the image from above if you cant see it for some reason:
http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/c...al/1916TR2.jpg

Any chance you could get in touch with the guy that posted that on that forum?

That looks a lot like what I have, wonder if what's inside is the same.
NightBiker07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2012, 01:04 AM   #27
Member
 
Julius793's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New york
Posts: 1,053
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBiker07

Any chance you could get in touch with the guy that posted that on that forum?

That looks a lot like what I have, wonder if what's inside is the same.
Pm him he's an active member, unless speedy petey closed your account?
__________________
Electricity will kill you if you give it a chance
Julius793 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2012, 01:33 AM   #28
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 9
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


He did :/ Apparently guys posting links to an Ebay auction of an antique electrical code book is professional, but trying to identify old electrical sockets isnt?

Last edited by NightBiker07; 01-09-2012 at 01:37 AM.
NightBiker07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2012, 05:13 AM   #29
011010100110111101100101
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 244
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBiker07 View Post
He did :/ Apparently guys posting links to an Ebay auction of an antique electrical code book is professional, but trying to identify old electrical sockets isnt?
When guys are more concerned with fraternity membership than safety of the public, this is what happens.

I understand the reasoning behind wanting only licensed electricians posting on the forum to keep from dumb, redundant questions being asked. But honestly, after 18 years I still ask dumb, redundant questions because frankly I don't do certain things that often and I like to check with sparky's that do it every day.

-- Joe
anesthes is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to anesthes For This Useful Post:
AndyinAtl (01-09-2012)
Old 01-09-2012, 05:26 AM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Md/Pa
Posts: 1,026
Default

Antique Electrical Plug


Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBiker07 View Post
That looks a lot like what I have, wonder if what's inside is the same.
I can almost guarantee that's your device.

zappa is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Schedule 40 PVC in Chicago? franwalker Electrical 56 12-20-2011 10:04 PM
Fixing multiple attic electrical issues before blowing in insulation darlingm Electrical 11 11-19-2011 09:19 AM
removed old romex (added new wire) and added a plug doesn't work now? Limit54 Electrical 9 11-08-2009 09:03 PM
20 amp plug MikeyP Electrical 6 01-03-2009 09:04 PM
New plug for toaster oven? mike720 Electrical 3 11-23-2008 07:44 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.