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Old 09-16-2012, 11:05 AM   #1
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Another GFCI Question


I have run two circuits for my counters, ]

A. The fist wall has a fridge outlet below counter and then 1 GFCI downstream (single protection, so its not protecting the fridge). I'm just not sure why my electrician felt it necessary to pigtail the fridge outlet.

I thought as long as the GFCI was downstream you would not have to do that?? Any thoughts???


B. The other circuit is on anther wall with two counter GFCI and one outlet below gas oven for the ovens igniter, clock/panel.
The order of the receptacles (wires not fully run yet) is:
Counter outlet---> oven outlet (below counter)---> last counter outlet.

I figured to not protect the oven on the GFCI, so will the setup i'll describe below make sense?

Line (Hot)--->1st outlet (GFCI) on its "line studs" pig tailed
to----> load (run) that goes to the oven outlet.
Simultaneously, the "load studs" on that 1st outlet GFCI will then run to the second counter outlet (non GFCI) to make it GFCI protected?

My goal is to run the cable in physical order of the pass and make the two counter GFCI protected and the oven not.

Will this cause faulty tripping, is it to code, and safe, and practical?

I could run pass the first counter, hit the oven first, then go to the first outlet (GFCI), and then the last?


Last edited by Jzone99; 09-16-2012 at 11:11 AM.
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:54 AM   #2
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Another GFCI Question


A) It's personal preference on pig-tailing the conductors, some do, some don't.

B) As long as the receptacle for the gas range is more than 6ft away from the sink it does not need GFCI protection

Would be better to run to oven first, as long as (B) does not apply.

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Old 09-16-2012, 12:02 PM   #3
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Another GFCI Question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gac66610 View Post
A)
B) As long as the receptacle for the gas range is more than 6ft away from the sink it does not need GFCI protection
If that receptacle is not serving the counter top, then GFCI protection is not required.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:15 PM   #4
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Another GFCI Question


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Originally Posted by stickboy1375 View Post
If that receptacle is not serving the counter top, then GFCI protection is not required.
Yes, I'm sure the oven does not have to be GFCI protected, I was not questioning the logistics of the arrangement (B). I just wanted confirmation B will be correct based on my proposed setup since it has one Line in and two loads out, one hot load going to the oven not GFCI protect by pig tailing and the other load going to the other counter GFCI protected since it will be coming off the studs.
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Old 09-16-2012, 12:20 PM   #5
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Another GFCI Question


You can wire it anyway you want, but the receptacles serving the counter top must be GFCI protected. And you need two circuits serving the counter top.
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Old 09-16-2012, 01:56 PM   #6
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Another GFCI Question


To make things simple, have one 20amp circuit serving the outlets for the fridge, stove, and a couple of baseboards, make the counters exclusively GFCI. Remember the KISS principle. If you wanted to, you could make all outlets regardless of their location on either the upper part at the counters, lower along the baseboards served by a gfci protection as the NEC states.

It states "min." 2 20 amp small appliance branch circuits in the Kitchen, but the kicker is, they are not exclusive to just serving counters only.

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