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Sunny B. 09-14-2011 08:06 AM

Amateur question
 
Hey guys!! I have a question which most of you will probably feel like it's a dum question but I don't know the answer, so I'm gonna ask. I was changing a temp receptical at work and I was doing it "live". My boss was walking by and saw me so he stopped and said "I know your not working live"(that's a big no-no in my company). So being that the panel was about 50 feet from where I was, and I was feeling to lazy to walk all the way over there, i tried to trip the breaker by striking the hot across the grounding conductor but the breaker didn't trip. I was just wondering how is that possible. A coworker told me that the circuit wasn't grounded properly which I disagree with. If anyone knows, please post. Thank you!

Code05 09-14-2011 08:15 AM

That was a silly and dangerous thing to do.

jbfan 09-14-2011 08:18 AM

That has got to be one of the stupidest stunts on the planet.

Never work live, being a rookie that goes double!!!!
Never try to short out the circuit.

If you got sparks, then the circuit was grounded.

I think your boss needs to give you a few days off to think about how stupid you were!!!!!!!!!


Did I point out how stupid that was?????

Your coworker a real jem also!

Code05 09-14-2011 08:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 727874)
That has got to be one of the stupidest stunts on the planet.

Never work live, being a rookie that goes double!!!!
Never try to short out the circuit.

If you got sparks, then the circuit was grounded.

I think your boss needs to give you a few days off to think about how stupid you were!!!!!!!!!


Did I point out how stupid that was?????

Your coworker a real jem also!

You are being too subtle, tell us how you really feel.:jester:

Jim Port 09-14-2011 08:30 AM

Hope your co-workers and friends aren't that lazy. If they are they might not carry your casket.

There are very few reasons to work live, even if you are experienced and have the proper PPE. Changing a receptacle is not one.

Sunny B. 09-14-2011 08:30 AM

Hey I knew that you guys was going to jump all over me but your not answering the question. I think it's because the grounding conductor was acting as a neutral. Am I right?

Jim Port 09-14-2011 08:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sunny B. (Post 727885)
Hey I knew that you guys was going to jump all over me but your not answering the question. I think it's because the grounding conductor was acting as a neutral. Am I right?

Even shorted to the neutral it would not matter. Where do the neutral and grounds connect to in service equipment? What is the purpose of the ground in the event of a fault?

jbfan 09-14-2011 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Code05 (Post 727879)
You are being too subtle, tell us how you really feel.:jester:

Ok, for those that did not quite understand my post.

If you are going to be stupid, and do stupid stuff, I hope that you do not hurt anyone else doing your stupid stuff!!!!!:whistling2:

secutanudu 09-14-2011 08:35 AM

Nobody wants to go anywhere near answering your question in fear of validating the stupid, stupid stunt you were attempting.

jbfan 09-14-2011 08:51 AM

See post 3

Jackofall1 09-14-2011 09:01 AM

You have heard it already so I won't harp on it, but the previous posts although abrasive are correct.

The question I have is, when you shorted the line did you indeed get any sparks? You haven't said whether you did or not.

If you did then I would be looking at replacing the breaker.

If you did not get sparks then you didn't ground the circuit (a foolish thing to do intentionally)

Any time line comes in contact with neutral or ground without a load (a dead short) the breaker must trip, if it doesn't then the breaker is faulty.

Mark

Code05 09-14-2011 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbfan (Post 727887)
Ok, for those that did not quite understand my post.

If you are going to be stupid, and do stupid stuff, I hope that you do not hurt anyone else doing your stupid stuff!!!!!:whistling2:

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

AllanJ 09-14-2011 10:22 AM

A momentary short might not trip the breaker.

Jackofall1 09-14-2011 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 727950)
A momentary short might not trip the breaker.

Given the human reaction time of 1/10 of second and a breaker reaction time of 1.5 cycles, (trip timing of a typical breaker) I am truly doubtfull of your statement.

If the OP shorted the circuit the breaker should have tripped period.

Mark

Sunny B. 09-14-2011 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port

Even shorted to the neutral it would not matter. Where do the neutral and grounds connect to in service equipment? What is the purpose of the ground in the event of a fault?

They are both bonded to the electrode. That's why I think the equipment ground acted as the grounded conductor in that situation


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