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Old 01-22-2012, 01:25 PM   #16
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Airtight recessed lights


What are air tight trims?

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Old 01-22-2012, 01:29 PM   #17
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Airtight recessed lights


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I have some 1990 juno ic 22 recessed lighting fixture....they are installed in ceiling with insulation...though they have various slots and holes in the cans...i assume that the slots and holes are for other applications...Can I tape them in an effort to reduce infiltration and exfilration????? Currently they have pink( Corning fiberglass) batt insulation around them...which actually does not surround the cans adequately (tightly)....I'm considering packing a loose fill fiberglass insulation ( Guardian e-z fill attic insulation) around them....there ic rated.....like the cooler type closure idea....what do you all think about taping the holes....brooker
I have been told by an "reputable" electrician that you can just plug up the holes in the can with the aluminum tape and it would then a non-IC rated can would become an IC can, but from what I have read, that is not the end of the story.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:45 AM   #18
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Airtight recessed lights


Yes, I will be looking for airtight trim....what do you think about taping small hole in can...I'm talking slivers of tape 3/8 x 1'' is the largest.....the big air leak was the whole house ceiling fan.... though recently made a cover...and what difference it makes.....in poking around in the attic I see there are slight gaps here and there.... I'm addressing those...

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Old 01-23-2012, 09:37 AM   #19
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Airtight recessed lights


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Yes, I well be looking for airtight trim....what do you think about taping small hole in can...I'm talking slivers of tape 3/8 x 1'' is the largest.....the big air leak was the whole house ceiling fan.... though recently made a cover...and what difference it makes.....in pocking around in attic I see there are slight gaps here and there.... I'm addressing those...
Yes. Plugging those holes will make a big difference. Looking at the Commercial Electric "Air-Tight IC cans at Home Depot, all they have done is put a piece of take over the holes in the side of the can. I can see how this would help reduce the loss of the conditioned air in the house, but I don't see how it then becomes an IC can where you are allowed by code to cover the can with insulation. Doesn't there have to be some sort of separation between the can, which gets pretty hot, and the insulation. Isn't that what the insulated box is for?
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Old 01-23-2012, 12:27 PM   #20
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Airtight recessed lights


best I can figure IC stands for insulation contact....the juno recessed light i have.... have a thermal senor on exterior of can..on the top...with plenty of trim and bulb combination posted on interior of can...as well... explains that over heating will result in blinking lights and so on....

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Old 02-09-2012, 06:06 PM   #21
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Airtight recessed lights


I talked to the someone at the Oregon Energy Trust today and he suggested Air Tight Baffles to solve part of the problem of the air infiltration through the recessed ceiling lights with attic space above.

Here is the actual code requirement for non-IC cans in Oregon. I am sure other states have different requirements.

"Existing recessed lights that are not IC-rated may be
found when ceiling insulation levels are increased as part
of a remodel. In these situations, a non-combustible baffle
must be used to keep insulation back and maintain a
three-inch fire clearance around the fixture. The top of the
fixture should either not be covered or maintain a 24-inch
clearance above the top fixture. Code does not require
replacement of existing non-IC rated lights in existing
buildings."


So, it looks like an airtight baffle with a cone made of light sheet metal, foamed in place and left open on the top would solve the problem. Yes?
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:53 PM   #22
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Airtight recessed lights


I am an electrician and Now work for a recessed lighting manufacturer.

1. I do not advise altering any openings in the fixture or creating your own barrier

2. The fixture has been tested & rated in a U.L. Registered lab for a specific use. If you alter the fixture you could void the U.L. Rating, which if by chance causes a fire could make you 100% at fault and no insurance coverage will be given

3. Making your own barrier can also create more heat than what is intended for the fixture. Each fixture has a thermal sensor and if overloaded will cause the fixture to no longer work, which means you would have to replace the fixture.

4. Your best bet overall is to replace the fixture with an IC remodel fixture. It is pretty simple to do yourself

Please call a licensed electrician if you are not up to the task!
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:39 AM   #23
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Airtight recessed lights


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Originally Posted by myheadspins View Post
I gave the solution of foam sealants and sealing trim rings to the person that ran my home through an energy audit and he gave me a better solution. He told me to forget the sealing the drywall and trim rings and put one stryrofoam cooler big enough to allow for 3+ clearance around each light and foam the cooler in place. The lights were barely visible in the infrared camera after this procedure. Before the sealing it was mind blowing how much heat I was tossing into the atmosphere.

I can say my lights are really sealed now not just kind of and it wasn't a big deal after moving the insulation around so the coolers could sit right and be foamed correctly. I had to trim some but that wasn't too bad. The outside doors shut way different now without all the holes in the roof. I have IC lights.. I can't even imagine what the old ones would be like.
Neat idea, but I don't recall seeing a UL label on a styrofoam cooler. Maybe I am missing it.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:42 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by chumley12 View Post
I have been told by an "reputable" electrician that you can just plug up the holes in the can with the aluminum tape and it would then a non-IC rated can would become an IC can, but from what I have read, that is not the end of the story.
Ah h_ll no. COuld cause more problems then it is worth.

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