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-   -   Adding an outlet on a 240V circuit? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/adding-outlet-240v-circuit-21633/)

Kjunk 05-30-2008 03:36 AM

Adding an outlet on a 240V circuit?
 
I have an L6-30R outlet I'd like to install, so I'm thinking I can tap into an
existing unused dryer outlet thats on the other side of an internal wall, already hooked up to a 30A breaker.
(red,black,white)(the current dryer outlet is the only one on the circuit, but I want to keep it)

But what are the rules?

Am I allowed to make this change to an existing circuit without permit or requiring it to be done by an electrician?

The exisiting outlet has screws down terminals that the existing wires are going into.
can I take the new piece of romex and put both conductors into the terminal and tighten to connect up the new line?

If not, what's the required method of joining the old and new lines together? Wire Nuts?

Thanks for your time. :)

jrclen 05-30-2008 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kjunk (Post 126743)
I have an L6-30R outlet I'd like to install, so I'm thinking I can tap into an
existing unused dryer outlet thats on the other side of an internal wall, already hooked up to a 30A breaker.
(red,black,white)(the current dryer outlet is the only one on the circuit, but I want to keep it)

But what are the rules?

Am I allowed to make this change to an existing circuit without permit or requiring it to be done by an electrician?

The exisiting outlet has screws down terminals that the existing wires are going into.
can I take the new piece of romex and put both conductors into the terminal and tighten to connect up the new line?

If not, what's the required method of joining the old and new lines together? Wire Nuts?

Thanks for your time. :)

240 volt outlets must be dedicated to a single purpose. One outlet per circuit. So adding one would be a violation of the electric code. You could eliminate the old one and extend the circuit to the new location. However a new dryer receptacle would be required to be a 4 wire receptacle due to code changes. What will the new receptacle be used for? Certain appliances can still use the 3 wire circuit.

Local rules would determine whether you need a permit and inspection. Usually a home owner is permitted to do electric work in his own home.

Generally only 1 wire is allowed in a wire terminal and certainly in this case. Give more information and we will try to help you. Hiring an electrician is always a good option.

Cow 05-30-2008 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrclen (Post 126808)
240 volt outlets must be dedicated to a single purpose. One outlet per circuit. So adding one would be a violation of the electric code.

Code article?

chris75 05-30-2008 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cow (Post 126869)
Code article?


I was wondering the same.... I would be more concerned with the size box he uses to splice off the existing circuit.

220/221 05-31-2008 01:10 AM

Quote:

240 volt outlets must be dedicated to a single purpose. One outlet per circuit
I assumed this to be true for most of my life.....until I started reading the message boards.

You can install multiple outlets.

Wire nuts/pigtails would be the legal connection. The lugs on the recep are probably nor rated for more than one conductor but they would obviously physically take more than one and still tighten down nicely.

Here, it would require a permit but only one in a thousand contractors would get one. Only one in a million homeowners would get one.

Stubbie 05-31-2008 02:23 AM

I think the only issue you may have would be local code as to whether they require dryer branch circuits to be individual or not. The NEC allows line to line (240 volts) and line to neutral (120 volts) for multiwire circuits provided the breaker is common trip double pole.
Just remember that even though the dryer is not being used you want to be cautious as to what you operate in the event both outlets come into service.

You cannot exceed the ampacity of the wire which is probably 30 amps and 10 awg copper. This would be unlikely to occur unless both loads are operating. In most cases you would trip out your breaker but just a heads up.

jrclen 05-31-2008 10:27 AM

In my location we refer to 210.23 and the table 210.24. If I am wrong, I stand corrected. But we can't do it here in a dwelling. Commercial it is no problem. If it is allowed then lets explain to the OP how to do it correctly.


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