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CapeCod153 06-20-2012 11:43 AM

adding new wired smoke detectors to existing wired smoke detectors
 
Hi. I own a 4 bedroom 1 1/2 story cape cod in NJ. The cape was moved about 10 years ago onto a new foundation and at that time new smoke detectors were hardwired and installed per code. These smoke detectors are interconnected with 14/3 wire with black, white, and orange. They are not wire in a series but rather a 14/3 wire terminates at each detector. I am now remodeling most of the cape and adding a 2 story addition and I will need to add new smoke detectors. I am required to have all detectors connected so they all sound if any one of them detects smoke. The new detectors are supposed to be wired in a series (1 14/3 wire coming in and 1 14/3 wire going out) and each detector has a black, red and white wire.

Does anyone know if I can simply run a 14/3 wire from one of the existing detectors to connect my new detectors (the new ones would be in series)?

Thanks!
Keith

Jim Port 06-20-2012 11:46 AM

The way the cabling is run to each smoke alarm does not matter whether is is all from a common point or daisy-chained. You only need them to be interconnected.

As far as running the cables the same rules apply as to box fill, securing etc.

CapeCod153 06-20-2012 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Port (Post 947641)
The way the cabling is run to each smoke alarm does not matter whether is is all from a common point or daisy-chained. You only need them to be interconnected.

As far as running the cables the same rules apply as to box fill, securing etc.

Thanks, Jim! yes, the existing are daisy chained...that is the term I was looking for.

Code05 06-20-2012 12:05 PM

Just a note that in days of yore mixing brands was a problem. Not sure if that is the case today or not.

Just noticed that you said your current smoke detectors are 10 years old, I believe many manufactures say that detectors are to be replaced after 7 years.

teamo 06-20-2012 01:50 PM

You can continue the circuit from any of the locations. The black and white are the line connections and the orange wire is the interconnect that sounds all of the devices when one of them activates. If each of the current smokes only have one 14/3 entering the box then there must be a junction box somewhere that they all originate from. If the detectors are 10 years old it is time to replace them. When you get everything wired buy a whole new set of detectors and replace them all at once.

stickboy1375 06-20-2012 08:04 PM

If you can't gain access to an existing smoke alarm, they also make wireless interconnects. And the correct terminology is "alarm" not "detector"

silversport 06-20-2012 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 947935)
And the correct terminology is "alarm" not "detector"

Are you serious?

"Detector" is universally accepted terminology; and interchangeable with "alarm" in this case.

Get over yourself.

Jim Port 06-20-2012 08:42 PM

Quote:

And the correct terminology is "alarm" not "detector"

Quote:

Originally Posted by silversport (Post 947961)
Are you serious?

"Detector" is universally accepted terminology; and interchangeable with "alarm" in this case.

Get over yourself.

He is correct, alarm is the correct term by definition. Accepted by incorrect usage does not make it right.

Try this link.

http://www.tpromo.com/fire-bbs/files/smokes2.pdf

CapeCod153 06-20-2012 09:22 PM

wow...thanks everyone! Great info. I did buy all new detectors, er sorry, alarms but I originally only did that cause the existing ones had yellowed. Now I feel better that I spent the money.

I can access the junction boxes in the basement but it is easier for me just to run another 14/3 out of the one alarm's box using pigtail splices on each black, red/orange, and white wire.

Thanks again everyone!

stickboy1375 06-21-2012 06:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by silversport (Post 947961)
Are you serious?

"Detector" is universally accepted terminology; and interchangeable with "alarm" in this case.

Get over yourself.

Sorry, but you are misinformed with that statement. And throwing out a little education here and there does not qualify me to get over myself. :)


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