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Old 07-17-2012, 10:38 AM   #1
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Adding a ground


I'm installing a new outlet in my basement for a light that hangs over my pool table. Next to where the outlet is going is the ground wire that goes from the breaker box to the ground stake outside. it runs across my basement, because the box is on the side of the house with a concrete driveway. The house is over 100 yrs. old, and most outlets are not grounded (2 connector wire - 3 prong receptacles) an I take a wire & wrap it around this bare ground wire, or cut the ground and connect it with a leg coming out to my breaker box and still be within NEC?

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Old 07-17-2012, 10:47 AM   #2
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Adding a ground


No...you cannot cut it. You can't wrap it either. You might be able to use a split bolt, but I don't have my code book in front of me to see if that is legal.

I would suggest that you check the metal boxes to see if there is actually a ground there. Just because you don't see a ground wire, doesn't mean there isn't a ground.

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Old 07-17-2012, 12:09 PM   #3
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Adding a ground


A new outlet may not be hitched onto the nearest existing 2 wire (groundless) circuit. You need a grounded cable back to the panel. Some spiral sheathed cable running between metal boxes is not an acceptable substitute for a ground wire (equipment grounding conductor) inside. Most of the qualifying spiral sheath has a bare strip or wire running the full length against the inside of the sheath outside of any cardboard lining. This strip does not have to come out the ends far enough to be wire nutted or screwed to other things.

An existing ungrounded receptacle could have a separate ground wire run up to the fat ground wire (grounding electrode conductor) and clamped on as you described. Do not cut the fat ground wire in order to use wire nuts. Just twisting or wrapping is not good enough.
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Old 07-17-2012, 12:34 PM   #4
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Adding a ground


Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
An existing ungrounded receptacle could have a separate ground wire run up to the fat ground wire (grounding electrode conductor) and clamped on as you described.
So I could "clamp on" a ground wire from my new box (that is connected to the receptacle) to the grounding electrode conductor. How would I clamp it on?
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Old 07-17-2012, 05:08 PM   #5
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Adding a ground


If the receptacle is accessible, just run a new circuit to it....
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Old 07-17-2012, 06:20 PM   #6
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Stickboy, The outlet is switched, and the switch is hidden behind a wall, and inaccessible. I would just run romex back to the panel, but that would be lots of extra work.
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Old 07-17-2012, 08:29 PM   #7
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Adding a ground


but it would be done right. Run power to the light, then use the existing wiring as a switch loop (tisk tisk, I know)
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:39 PM   #8
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Adding a ground


Example of a "u bolt" clamp that might be used to hold ground wires together.
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Old 07-17-2012, 11:07 PM   #9
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OH, ok, a wire clip. I am familiar with those. Thank you.

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