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Old 12-13-2009, 12:55 PM   #1
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


I just bought a jointer that requires a 220v outlet. I want to use the 3-prong dryer outlet (obviously would not use both appliances at the same time). I can think of two different ways to do this. First would be to make a cord starting with the dryer pigtail on the male end and using wire to connect a female 220v plug. The second would be to split the wire coming out of the breaker panel that goes to the dryer plug. My thought would be to split the wire as it comes out with one end going to the dryer receptacle and the other going to a 220 outlet. I could then plug in and use the appliance I need. Ideally I could even have a switch where the two are split so I have to choose one or the other. Is either of these an option?

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Old 12-13-2009, 03:14 PM   #2
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


Why go through all of that? If you are going to the trouble of splitting this circuit and putting in a switch then you could just as easily add a circuit for the jointer. If it were me I would run a new 220 circuit from the panel and mount a new box and outlet where you need it.

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Old 12-13-2009, 03:48 PM   #3
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


I agree. Also install the correct amperage breaker that the manufacturer recommends. (Might be different.)
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Old 12-13-2009, 07:56 PM   #4
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


I would love to add a new breaker but my panel is already full - there are no unused slots. That is why I am looking at other options - I should have said that in my initial post.
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Old 12-13-2009, 08:27 PM   #5
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


Well the right way to do this is to add a subpanel, use two slots to power the subpanel, and move a couple of circuits over to the subpanel.

Or with some panels you can get space saving breakers which are two breakers to one slot.
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Old 12-13-2009, 08:27 PM   #6
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


Quote:
Originally Posted by popeka View Post
I would love to add a new breaker but my panel is already full - there are no unused slots. That is why I am looking at other options - I should have said that in my initial post.
You're not allowed to "share" a dryer circuit.
If your panel is filled to capacity install a subpanel to accommodate the new circuit you need.
Be sure to isolate the neutrals from the ground wires.

I agree with Billy Bob

Last edited by ChristopherSprks; 12-13-2009 at 08:28 PM. Reason: agree with Billy Bob
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Old 12-13-2009, 08:43 PM   #7
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


The only way I see you using the dryer circuit is if the jointer has the same specs & needs a 30a breaker too
Unplug the dryer, plug in the jointer

Other then that I'd run a sub
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Old 12-13-2009, 09:33 PM   #8
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Adding a 220v jointer to a dryer outlet


Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy_Bob View Post
Well the right way to do this is to add a subpanel, use two slots to power the subpanel, and move a couple of circuits over to the subpanel.

Or with some panels you can get space saving breakers which are two breakers to one slot.
Adding a subpanel is a better idea than using space saving breakers. (or "piggy back" as they're called on the Square D brand.) But the other option (of "splitting the circuit") is completely illegal. Because according to the NEC a dryer has to be on a Dedicated circuit, with a separate wire for the ground going back to the panel. In addition to the Neutral.

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