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Old 09-09-2011, 09:54 AM   #16
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


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Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Using a power supply with a lower current rating could potentially damage the power supply. It's unlikely to do anything bad to the flash unit, and will probably just lengthen the charging time. An 1800mA adapter can probably source a few amps for a few seconds at a time with no problem. So that's probably fine. If the charge time is substantially longer than on batteries, consider upgrading the power supply.
Thanks for the info. I've managed to pick up a 5v 6A power supply to try too (although I'll have to wait for its arrival). As it is apparent that my Alkalines provide 4x 1.5v but my NiMh do 4x 1.25v so I'm thinking 5v should be ok.

Hopefully I can report back on durations this evening regarding the 1800mA adapter, and I can go from there.

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Old 09-09-2011, 10:00 AM   #17
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


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25A from AA batteries is not likely. In fact, it's mostly impossible unless they are nicd or nimh. If that unit does use high-quality nicd or nimh cells, then 25A is definitely possible. What's more likely is that the power supply is carefully designed to draw current more evenly during the charge cycle, which results in a much faster charge for a given peak current draw. Thus, a 2-second 60 joule charge might only require 8A or so, but draw it consistently during the whole charging period. This is better for batteries with limited current capability.
Wow, thats cool to know. Like I said I've a very limited understanding of Current, but I never thought AA batteries could be that powerful. NiMh batteries are highly recommended for Flash Units, so I'm guessing they will beable to provide very high Ampage. Like you say though, I'm guessing this YN560 flash head (I'm hoping to try this evening too) is probably designed to pull the Current in a more efficient way, if the 1800mA supply takes too long I'll deffinately try out the 6A one when it arrives, as I really want to be safe (for both Supply and Flash Head).
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Old 09-09-2011, 05:27 PM   #18
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


A 3A supply will work ok,
It might just take a fraction longer to charge up,
But it wont be significant.
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:11 AM   #19
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


So... I got my new YN560 Flashes today.. and well decided, No Guts, no Glory!

I figured I might beable to bypass the whole Wooden Batteries and build the DC Socket into the Chasis.. after opening one up, it was pretty crammed in there, but things went OK.

The Parts:
http://img607.imageshack.us/img607/9273/partsi.jpg

The Steps:
http://img695.imageshack.us/img695/6122/stepsy.jpg

After finishing I plugged in the DC adapter and well it started up and then turned off. weird... Then I tried batteries and nothing happened. Then I tried it all again and Success. For both, weird. Maybe I got a shoddy connection in there... perhaps patching the Cable into the battery wire was a bad idea? I'm not really sure how it affects the flow of electricity.. I didn't fancy trying my soldering skills on the tiny circuitboard terminals.

Since leaving it a bit and trying again I experienced the same power cycling a few times before being able to get it running, I'm guessing I screwed something up in the wiring, is this patching bad to do (see below)?


Anyways, the good news is... At full power the flash head (different one from previous discussions) takes 7 seconds to charge with my 1800mA DC adapter, and on Alkalines it takes 10 seconds.

I'm still worried about about potential damage to the DC adapter (because its unable to provide more than 1.8A), and also the odd problem I had when turning it on from cold, but not a bad start. Hoping my 6V 3000mA and 5V 6000mA adapters will be safer. I'll test them when they arrive from HongKong.

And hoping you guys might offer a suggestion to why the device power cycles.. I can film a video if needed.

Last edited by JonReeves; 09-10-2011 at 02:41 PM. Reason: Turn Large Images to URLs
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:39 AM   #20
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


so, oddly enough, I grabbed another of the flash heads, fresh from the box, shoved in the same batteries and pressed ON. It took three goes to get it started too.. Guess the device must pull power from the batteries even when its off, and requires a small charge to beable to even power up in the first place.

Thankfully I guess that means I've not screwed anything up, its just a defect/feature in design of the Flash Head. It just means I'm guessing I'll have to plug the DC adapter in and wait a few seconds before powering up, gonna test it in a second after the flash head has emptied its capacitors.
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Old 09-10-2011, 02:47 AM   #21
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


I went and started work on the Vivitar 285HV Flash I'd been talking about since the start.

I opened it up in a hope to find space for a Socket, but it was just too crammed. I decided to go ahead and build the Wooden Batteries as-per my initial plan.

Everything went well. Below are the steps I took:
http://img836.imageshack.us/img836/5...vitarsteps.jpg

So the moment of truth... it worked

Those Alkalines get me 32seconds right now (guess they are nearly drained)
Fresh NiMH are coming in at 14seconds.
The 6V 1800mA DC Adapter is getting me 10seconds.

Sweet!

So, I got 2 more of these Wooden Battery things to make and 2 more installed DC Sockets and then I'm all done.

Any suggestions from improvements for the next batch?

Again I'm still a little worried that the Flash Heads are trying to draw more than 1800mA and might burn out the DC adapter, is this a real posibility?

Last edited by JonReeves; 09-10-2011 at 02:41 PM. Reason: Turn Large Images to URLs
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Old 09-10-2011, 07:34 AM   #22
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


First, you should resize the pictures so they fit the screen to eliminate the need to scroll left to right to read the text.

From the pictures and drawing, it looks like you've left the batteries connected in parallel with the circuit board so the AC adapter has to charge the batteries along with cycling the flash.
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Old 09-10-2011, 02:40 PM   #23
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


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Originally Posted by a7ecorsair View Post
First, you should resize the pictures so they fit the screen to eliminate the need to scroll left to right to read the text.

From the pictures and drawing, it looks like you've left the batteries connected in parallel with the circuit board so the AC adapter has to charge the batteries along with cycling the flash.
Sorry about the images, I didn't notice the problem as my screen is a fair size. I'll make sure to shrink them in the future.

Regarding the connection, that was my fear. I couldn't figure another way to wire it in, that wouldn't cause part of the power to go towards the battery cage. The good news is, I will either use Batteries or DC, never both at the same time. Is this still a dangerous or wasteful connection, or can I live with it, for this one.

The DC Socket I have has a switch on it, so I'm guessing the best thing to do would have been to wire it so that the battery unit is ON until a dc Jack is plugged in, however I've a sneaky feeling that means desoldering both battery points from the circuit board and parsing them through the switch, and soldering 2 new wires from the switch the the board again. I think I saw it outlined here:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Add-...the-Batteries/

sort of like this:


I best go practice my soldering its been like 18 years. meh.
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Old 09-10-2011, 08:34 PM   #24
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


Installed the next DC Socket into YN560 Flash head number 2, this time wired up the Switch part of the DC Socket by Severing the Battery-to-CircuitBoard lines in half and attaching them directly to the correct pins (didn't fancy re-soldering to the board).


Tested with NiMh batteries and Mains adapter both working well. Seems like this method is much more logical, and neat. Thanks for the advise.
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Old 09-11-2011, 01:08 AM   #25
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


In the interest of closure.. I went back and re-wired the first Flash Head as-per the others. It seemed like the safer/better option.

I just finished all 3 of them + did the 3 Battery Cassettes for the Vivitar Heads too. Everything seems to work nicely. Attached is an image of my finished handy work.
http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/6893/flashes.jpg

Thank you all for your advise and information, its been really educational.

I will post back in this thread when I receive my 6V 3000mA and 5V 6000mA adapters to report on whether it fixed the non-start issue, how it affected charge time, or if it blew everything up. I hope this thread is useful to others.
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Old 09-20-2011, 04:35 PM   #26
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AD/DC adapter for Battery Powered Device


UPDATE:

Unfortunately the 6V 3000mA adapter didn't resolve the non-starting issue. However I discovered that leaving the flash on the the lowest power before turning it off, allows it to start first time.

Hopefully I'll have some 6000mA 5V adapters coming today or tomorrow so we'll see if that makes a difference.

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