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Old 11-23-2008, 02:35 PM   #1
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90 degree wire


Light fixtures say to connect to 90 degree(C) wire only. My house has aluminum wiring which I think does not meet the new 90 degree wire standard. Do I have an alternative to rewiring house just to install a new light fixture? I was going to install a flourescent fixture but the warning of 90 degrees was on that fixture as well.

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Old 11-23-2008, 03:03 PM   #2
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90 degree wire


If there is an attic above there is a simple fix. Remove the wire from the exisitng box. Put a new box in that is accessible fromthe attic. Run a cable from the new box to the old box. Make sure the cable is NM-B. The -B is the 90C rating. Also make sure you use proper AL to CU rated connectors.

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Old 11-23-2008, 03:29 PM   #3
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90 degree wire


joed, I will still be connecting 90 degree rated wire to non 90 degree wires in the second box. Is the difference because by using the second box, I will have separated the non 90 degree wires from the heat generating fixture?
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Old 11-23-2008, 03:33 PM   #4
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90 degree wire


Quote:
Originally Posted by Captflx View Post
Light fixtures say to connect to 90 degree(C) wire only.
They usually don't say this on the outside of the package because it may affect sales.

If a ceiling lamp has this wire you may be able to safely use it with half the rated lamp wattage or use CFLs. I brought up this derating method to UL but they wouldn't yea or nay it.
If you do it, change the labelling in the lamp housing.

The wall lamps don't seem to have this restriction, probably 'cause all the heat rises instead of going into the box and fixture.

I can't imagine why a flourescent fixture with long skinny wires would have this restriction, but I've seen it too. An electrician told me that you do not need the 90C wire in the box, but I forget his explanation. It sounded plausible, once he explained it. If you replace only the ballast you don't have to worry about the 90C stuff.
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Old 11-23-2008, 05:18 PM   #5
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90 degree wire


Quote:
If a ceiling lamp has this wire you may be able to safely use it with half the rated lamp wattage or use CFLs.
You can't legally install it. You do not know what the next person will install for a bulb.
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Old 11-23-2008, 05:29 PM   #6
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90 degree wire


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joed, I will still be connecting 90 degree rated wire to non 90 degree wires in the second box. Is the difference because by using the second box, I will have separated the non 90 degree wires from the heat generating fixture?
That is the key to your situation.

The concern with conductor temperature ratings and light fixtures are to eliminate the hazards created by the excessive heat given off by the fixture (lamps usually in incandescents, ballasts in fluorescents) which deteriorate the conductor insulation if it is not rated properly for the temperatures it will be exposed to.
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Old 11-23-2008, 05:46 PM   #7
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90 degree wire


thanks to all.

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