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Old 06-11-2011, 04:33 PM   #1
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


Many of the circuits in my house are wired with two-wire NM with a paper sheath (The old silver stuff). No, in most cases there is not ground wrapped around a screw - the cable truly has only the two conductors.

The outlets are all worn out and will not hold a plug. In some cases I have been able to run new wires, in others it is not possible.

The two prong replacement outlets are of extremely low quality. I hate having plugs that don't stay in, but even more the poor connections mean that heat will be generated.

What I would like to do is to replace them with quality 20A grounded receptacles with the ground hole plugged with a construction adhesive or a plastic rod so that it permanently becomes a two prong outlet.

Since it is legal to replace them with a two prong piece of crap that makes a poor connection, it seems like this should be acceptable too.

What would the inspectors out there do if you found this?

Thanks.
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Old 06-11-2011, 04:49 PM   #2
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


GFI are also an approved method of changeing 2 prong plugs to 3 prong plugs.
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Old 06-11-2011, 05:14 PM   #3
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Thanks. I know (That GFIs are an alternative). In a bedroom in a dry house I value a tight, low resistance grip more than the GFI function. The ones I have seen don't grip like a good Pass & Seymour receptacle. I see them as a gadget that can malfunction with little benefit.

I am wondering if an inspector might see my 3-prong with a plugged hole for what it in effect is - a two prong.
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Old 06-11-2011, 05:16 PM   #4
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


It is a violation of the NEC to do this because it is not using the device as listed. So, if your jurisdiction follows the NEC you've got a problem with your plan.
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Old 06-11-2011, 05:28 PM   #5
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


Got it. The code explicitly precludes thinking. I guess that eliminates subjective judgments and endless appeals, driving everything to black and white, which is of course a good thing. I think this means I am in for several hundred dollars of GFCIs.

Any opinions on brands that are good would be appreciated.
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Old 06-11-2011, 05:46 PM   #6
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


A GFI can protect any receptacles that are wired downstream if the LOAD terminals are used. I doubt that you would need hundreds of dollars worth of GFIs. They are around $15 for good ones. I like the P&S brand.

A GFI breaker could also be used.
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Old 06-11-2011, 05:51 PM   #7
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


Thanks! I like the GFI breaker idea better. Unfortunately I have "Pushmatic" breakers, and it is hard to find even non-GFI ones. When/If I ever put in a new panel, I will use GFI breakers to drive the old two-wire circuits.
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Old 06-11-2011, 07:01 PM   #8
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


Quote:
Originally Posted by rnsc View Post
Thanks! I like the GFI breaker idea better. Unfortunately I have "Pushmatic" breakers, and it is hard to find even non-GFI ones. When/If I ever put in a new panel, I will use GFI breakers to drive the old two-wire circuits.
An alternative to a GFCI breaker is to install a GFCI receptacle next to the panel and then feed the circuit in question from the load side of the GFCI.
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Old 06-11-2011, 09:24 PM   #9
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


Quote:
Originally Posted by rnsc View Post
Thanks. I know (That GFIs are an alternative). In a bedroom in a dry house I value a tight, low resistance grip more than the GFI function. The ones I have seen don't grip like a good Pass & Seymour receptacle. I see them as a gadget that can malfunction with little benefit.
P & S makes a 2 wire receptacle:

http://www.google.com/products/catal...ed=0CDEQ8wIwAw
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Old 06-11-2011, 10:05 PM   #10
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3->2 Receptical conversion OK?


There is two legit way you can do this with exsting conductors sans grounding conductor is either use the GFCI breaker or GFCI receptale if you do use the GFCI device { it don't matter which way you choose on them } then you have to use the sticker say " no equiment ground avaibale "* or use the legit two slot recpectale as one guy posted that is the only two ways you can do with them.

Merci,
Marc

* that part you have to becarefull due some inspectors may not approve it due they claim that if you put the siticker on and somehow the sticker is gone then it will become not legit at all so that kinda a fine line to think about it.
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