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Old 08-14-2012, 01:52 PM   #1
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2P 240v GFI Breaker neutral question


Hi All,

Will a 2P GFI circuit breaker work without bringing a load neutral back to the breaker lug/screw. That's how it's working right now. I have a 30A 2P GFCI. Both the neutral pigtail from the breaker and the load neutral (white) are connected to the same bus bar. Only the line (black) connected to line on breaker. The ground to ground bar naturally. Seems to be working without a problem. TEST button works when pushed and brings breaker to tripped position. This is correct and by design, yes?

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~Skelley

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Old 08-14-2012, 02:23 PM   #2
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2P 240v GFI Breaker neutral question


Not correct.

It might be working because there is either no load on it or only a 240V load (no current in the neutral) or it is defective.

The correct connection is the circuit neutral connects to the breaker and the breaker pigtail connects to the neutral bar.

I dont think the GFCI circuitry can work properly without a neutral connection.

Kevin

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Old 08-14-2012, 03:59 PM   #3
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2P 240v GFI Breaker neutral question


The breaker's neutral pigtail must be connected to the neutral bus (as it is) in order for the breaker's internal circuitry to work properly. The load neutral connection is optional, but if the load has any neutral current (i.e. isn't a 240V-only load) then the neutral must be connected to the breaker's neutral terminal, not the neutral bus in the panel. The way you have it wired, the GFCI will trip as soon as any neutral current exists because the GFCI breaker will sense an imbalance. If it's working, that means that your load does not use the neutral connection at all and is 240V only.
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Old 08-15-2012, 06:38 AM   #4
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2P 240v GFI Breaker neutral question


Thanks guys. So I should just swap the breaker out with a standard 30A 2P breaker? I could save this one for when I install the Hot tub/Spa on my patio. That will require a neutral for sure. What's funny is that this GFCI breaker is 240v only as I was looking at the specs online just now. Naturally, all other 2P 30A breakers for my panel are 120/240v so that would work also.

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~Skells
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Old 08-15-2012, 06:43 AM   #5
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2P 240v GFI Breaker neutral question


swap it and save it
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