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Old 11-01-2009, 02:44 AM   #1
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


hello. I am new on this forum and I am just wanting to be sure if I am doing the right thing here.

240v goes to subpanel that has 4x20a 120v breakers. each breakers is hooked to an outlet - in this case it has 6 outlets:
circuit1= one outlet
circuit2 = two oulets
circuit 3 = two outlets
circuit 4 = one outlets

here are the photos and please let me know if the hookups are correct.
Attached Thumbnails
240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits-240voutsidepanel.jpg   240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits-insidepanel_label2.jpg   240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits-insidepanel_label.jpg  

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Old 11-01-2009, 05:50 AM   #2
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


How many wires are in that cord? What gauge is the cord? What is the ground wire connected to? From the looks of the plug, it's a 6-30P, which is used on straight 240V appliances. What is this setup going to be used for?

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Old 11-01-2009, 07:13 AM   #3
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


You CANNOT use the green wire as a neutral. You MUST use a 4-wire cord and receptacle that has two hots (black-red), a neutral (white), and a ground (green-bare). The feed to the receptacle must also be 4-wire.
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:25 AM   #4
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


HH is completely correct.

You MUST have a 120/240v circuit, or a straight 120v circuit to power that panel. DO NOT use it on a straight 240v circuit as it is wired now!

As it stands, that whole thing is dangerous and SHOULD NOT be used!!!!!
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:33 AM   #5
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
HH is completely correct.

You MUST have a 120/240v circuit, or a straight 120v circuit to power that panel. DO NOT use it on a straight 240v circuit as it is wired now!

As it stands, that whole thing is dangerous and SHOULD NOT be used!!!!!
But, it's for the band, man. Big gig tonight.

Last edited by jerryh3; 11-01-2009 at 07:38 AM.
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:40 AM   #6
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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But, it's for the band, man. Big gig tonight.

Well that makes all the difference. That and sanding the floor, right?
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:45 AM   #7
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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Well that makes all the difference. That and sanding the floor, right?
Hell no. I tie right into the main lugs with alligator clips for a floor sander.
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Old 11-01-2009, 09:27 AM   #8
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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You CANNOT use the green wire as a neutral. You MUST use a 4-wire cord and receptacle that has two hots (black-red), a neutral (white), and a ground (green-bare). The feed to the receptacle must also be 4-wire.

so you are saying I need to put in a 4 wire 240v cord to the breaker and use 120/240v receptacles to make this work?

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Originally Posted by jerryh3 View Post
How many wires are in that cord? What gauge is the cord? What is the ground wire connected to? From the looks of the plug, it's a 6-30P, which is used on straight 240V appliances. What is this setup going to be used for?
3 wire in that cord. ground is connected to the breaker box metal surface (body unit)

setup used to plug in an 240v outlet that can power up 120v applicances such as power tools, industrial lamps and a microwave all producing at least 5000 to 6000 watts at once

which is why i came up with 240v and split in 4 120v circuits

please help me out on a better solution to get this done right.
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:28 AM   #9
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


anyone?
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:32 AM   #10
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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so you are saying I need to put in a 4 wire 240v cord to the breaker and use 120/240v receptacles to make this work?



3 wire in that cord. ground is connected to the breaker box metal surface (body unit)

setup used to plug in an 240v outlet that can power up 120v applicances such as power tools, industrial lamps and a microwave all producing at least 5000 to 6000 watts at once

which is why i came up with 240v and split in 4 120v circuits

please help me out on a better solution to get this done right.
Ok. Let's start from scratch. You can't make 120V outlets from a 240V outlet. You can, however, make them from a 240/120 outlet. For this you'll need a four wire cord with a four wire plug/receptacle. L1/L2/N/G. L1 and L2 to the bus two bus bars which you have correct. The neutral wire will connect to an isolated bar in the sub panel. The ground will connect to a bar which is bonded to the sub panel. The way you have it set up right now, the receptacles are not grounded and the ground wire at the receptacle is acting as the neutral. No bueno.

Last edited by jerryh3; 11-01-2009 at 10:37 AM.
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:46 AM   #11
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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Ok. Let's start from scratch. You can't make 120V outlets from a 240V outlet. You can, however, make them from a 240/120 outlet. For this you'll need a four wire cord with a four wire plug/receptacle. L1/L2/N/G. L1 and L2 to the bus two bus bars which you have correct. The neutral wire will connect to an isolated bar in the sub panel. The ground will connect to a bar which is bonded to the sub panel. The way you have it set up right now, the receptacles are not grounded and the ground wire at the receptacle is acting as the neutral. No bueno.

what happens if the 240v(3wire) input to panel COMES from an 240v OUTLET (receptacle) which is why I made the plug so i can just plug it in...

the panel is supposed to be portable, I want a 240v plug where I can just plug it in and use... what can I do about this issue?

suggestions?
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Old 11-01-2009, 10:57 AM   #12
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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Originally Posted by synstealth View Post
what happens if the 240v(3wire) input to panel COMES from an 240v OUTLET (receptacle) which is why I made the plug so i can just plug it in...

the panel is supposed to be portable, I want a 240v plug where I can just plug it in and use... what can I do about this issue?

suggestions?
Do what the others have suggested and use a 4-wire cord. A dryer or range cord should be readily available in 4-wire.

The way it is now may work, but it is not correct and could be quite dangerous depending on how the receptacle that you plug into is wired. Also, judging by the white cable going to the receptacles on the board, I'm guessing that is 14-2, so you need to use 15 A breakers, not 20 A.
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Old 11-01-2009, 11:09 AM   #13
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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Do what the others have suggested and use a 4-wire cord. A dryer or range cord should be readily available in 4-wire.

The way it is now may work, but it is not correct and could be quite dangerous depending on how the receptacle that you plug into is wired. Also, judging by the white cable going to the receptacles on the board, I'm guessing that is 14-2, so you need to use 15 A breakers, not 20 A.

the 240v plug is 3 prong looks like this: (-.-) is there a 4 wire for this plug?



4000watts on a 120v circuit (knowing that one receptacle can support only one 1000w app) so I built 4 circuits to run them all at once.

Last edited by synstealth; 11-01-2009 at 11:20 AM.
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Old 11-01-2009, 11:15 AM   #14
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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the 240v plug is 3 prong looks like this: (-.-) is there a 4 wire for this plug?

can I add a ground wire along with the 3 wire 240v? as an single shielded ground wire so it can act as 4th wire (same gauge of course) instead of replacing 3 wire with an 4 wire?
No, there is not. That is a straight 240 plug. You could just use a dryer cord/receptacle if 30A is sufficient.

Last edited by jerryh3; 11-01-2009 at 11:21 AM.
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Old 11-01-2009, 11:15 AM   #15
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240v to subpanel with 4x 120v circuits


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the 240v plug is 3 prong looks like this: (-.-) is there a 4 wire for this plug?
NO.

That is a 3-wire straight 240v plug. You need a 4-wire cord AND plug AND circuit. You need a neutral along with the two hots and ground.

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