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-   -   240V baseboard heater - 12/2 or 10/2 ? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/240v-baseboard-heater-12-2-10-2-a-33328/)

pmoe 12-07-2008 12:51 PM

240V baseboard heater - 12/2 or 10/2 ?
 
Quick question -

I am wanting to run two 240V baseboard heaters in parallel to two bathrooms on the same end of the house (1st and 2nd level, though). This is the opposite end of the house from the panel, so the wire needs to run about 40-50' across the basement before getting to the first heater. Then it will likely be run up and across the ceiling and be fished up to the 2nd bathroom right above it.

I'd ballpark the total run at about 70'. The 1st heater is only 2.5' and only draws about 2.1 Amps. I haven't purchased the second one yet, but I'm not planning on something very large, so I'm assuming a 20 Amp circuit will be more than enough.

My electrician is saying this is too long for 12/2 and I need to use 10 gauge instead.

True?

Thanks!

williswires 12-07-2008 01:12 PM

You'll be fine with the 12/2 for these heaters at that distance.

rgsgww 12-07-2008 01:46 PM

If you stay around 4-6 amps, at that distance, you should be ok.

Speedy Petey 12-07-2008 02:08 PM

With a 240v circuit at 70' voltage drop is NOT even close to an issue.

A full 16A load on #12, @ 70', @240V, is 1.85%.
Hell, even #14 @ 16A and 70' is under 3%.


Pmoe, your electrician is loopy. That or he has a huge overstock on #10 wire.

pmoe 12-07-2008 02:21 PM

Many thanks for the responses! I thought 10/2 was overkill.

If I can ask a bonus question - is there a recent NEC requirement to add a fuse between the two heaters? He mentioned this as well.

Speedy Petey 12-07-2008 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pmoe (Post 195184)
If I can ask a bonus question - is there a recent NEC requirement to add a fuse between the two heaters? He mentioned this as well.

HUH??? Never heard of such as silly thing.

rgsgww 12-07-2008 02:42 PM

I think he just wants you to get confused, think its too hard, and have him do it.

micromind 12-07-2008 06:41 PM

In this installation, there would be nothing wrong with using 14/2 and a 15 amp two pole breaker.

Some guys just can't seem to hook up a 240 volt circuit with anything less than #10's. If I live to be 100, I'll never figure out why!

The breaker in the panel protects the wire, and the heaters will only draw the amount of current that's figured from the nameplate. There's no need or requirement for individual fusing of baseboard heaters, but I will say this; even though this person claims to be an electrician, his knowledge of code, as well as trade practices, are sorely lacking.

Makes me have serious doubts about the validity of the rest of the installation. You would do well to be present when the city/ county/ state inspector looks at the installation, and ask as many questions as you can.


Rob

pmoe 12-07-2008 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by micromind (Post 195257)
There's no need or requirement for individual fusing of baseboard heaters, but I will say this; even though this person claims to be an electrician, his knowledge of code, as well as trade practices, are sorely lacking.

I didn't mention this earlier, but he actually told me to get 10/3 instead of 10/2. I figured out the lack of need for a common on my own by looking at diagrams.

The bit about running a fuse between the heaters was advice he got from an electrician friend of his.

Just for the record, he's only done two jobs for me thus far - one was diagnosing and fixing a 3 way switch from a fixture I had taken down and couldn't figure out on my own and the other was just installing an outdoor ceiling fan into an existing box.

I've done all the other electrical work in this house on my own. I am just over my head with projects at the moment and was trying to take off some of the burden.

I may wind up doing all this work myself, except maybe the panel hookups.

Thanks again to all.

Speedy Petey 12-07-2008 07:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pmoe (Post 195271)
I didn't mention this earlier, but he actually told me to get 10/3 instead of 10/2. I figured out the lack of need for a common on my own by looking at diagrams.

The bit about running a fuse between the heaters was advice he got from an electrician friend of his.

All I can say is WOW! :no: :whistling2:

pmoe 12-07-2008 07:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey (Post 195281)
All I can say is WOW! :no: :whistling2:

Also told me a 240V heater would use a lot more energy than a 120.

rgsgww 12-07-2008 07:59 PM

Was that box rated for the outdoor fan?????

pmoe 12-07-2008 08:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rgsgww (Post 195288)
Was that box rated for the outdoor fan?????

Probably not. It's probably an old pancake box if it's like most things around here.

I was going to replace it with one of these anyway:

http://www.doityourself.com/invt/u492827

There's going to be another ceiling fan on the opposite end of the porch. I bought metal raceway to run, but he told me it was the wrong thing. Turns out I just hadn't bought the clips to hang it. So I ran the raceway myself and fished the wire for the second fan.

Speedy Petey 12-07-2008 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pmoe (Post 195284)
Also told me a 240V heater would use a lot more energy than a 120.

O-M-G!

I hardly ever say this, but you should really report this guy to whatever AHJ (authority having jurisdiction) is in your area. This hack is going to kill someone.

micromind 12-08-2008 10:16 PM

Not only are his trade practices a bit shady, and his knowledge of the code sorely lacking, but it is now obvious that he doesn't even understand basic electrical theory!

I agree with Petey above, this guy is going to get someone killed someday, hopefully it'll be himself.

This is downright scary!

Rob


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