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MT Stringer 10-05-2012 11:45 PM

220v Question
 
I was thinking about replacing my tired old Craftsman table saw with a new one. It runs on 115v. I don't have 220v readily assessable to where the saw would be placed. So, is it feasible to run an extension cord (rated for 220v) from the 220v dryer receptacle along the inside wall to the saw...about 20-25 feet? This is all inside my one car garage.

Note: My dryer operates with natural gas so the 220v is not used, and hasn't been used in the past 25 years we have lived here.

Your thoughts appreciated.

Thanks
Mike

Big John Studd 10-06-2012 12:28 AM

It's not the preferred method, but I'd say, yes, it is feasible. I've run all sorts of heavy duty equipment in the field off 220 extensions from a generator. I would disconnect the extensions when you are not using it. Are the garage walls all finished off? Generally it's pretty easy to relocate an existing receptacle.

joecaption 10-06-2012 03:57 AM

Why not just buy a new saw that also runs on 110 v?
There's hundreds of them avalible.

Speedy Petey 10-06-2012 06:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1024875)
Why not just buy a new saw that also runs on 110 v?
There's hundreds of them avalible.

Because a 240V motor will not work as hard and will start MUCH easier as compared to the the equivalent 120V motor.

MT Stringer 10-06-2012 10:15 AM

Thanks for your thoughts. The garage is finished out with drywall and insulated along the outside wall. The attic is insulated also. With a low pitch roof (3/12) it would be tough for an electrician to drill through the top plate on the outside wall to run 220 down to a receptacle. That is why I was thinking about a heavy duty extension cord.

Buying a saw that runs off of 110v is most likely what I will wind up doing. I just wanted to explore my options. The receptacle is on the end wall and the saw sits by the overhead door so I would have to route the extension cord over to and along the outside wall to the receptacle.

Still thinking. This is not a must do thing and I do have time to work it out. I am just getting the "new toy" fever, that's all. :-)

k_buz 10-06-2012 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MT Stringer (Post 1025008)
Thanks for your thoughts. The garage is finished out with drywall and insulated along the outside wall. The attic is insulated also. With a low pitch roof (3/12) it would be tough for an electrician to cut drill through the top plate on the outside wall to run 220 down to a receptacle.

You would be surprised. There are many ways to skin a cat.

MT Stringer 10-06-2012 11:22 AM

I guess one option would be to run conduit from the receptacle around the walls. I could change out the receptacle and put in a junction box on both ends of the conduit with the correct receptacle on the tool end.

Is there anything wrong with that train of thought? No doubt I would get a friend involved that does electrical work to make the tie ins.

Note 1: I have owned this house 25 years and it is paid for so I won't be moving anytime soon. If I ran the conduit, it would be easy to undo my conduit if the dryer connection was ever to be needed. We just replaced our old gas dryer with a new one, so we won't be needing 220v for any time soon.

Note 2: I have a half inch conduit bender. :-)

ddawg16 10-06-2012 11:31 AM

Which model saw are you looking at?

I have the Ryobi Bt3000.....works great....have never had any issues.....and it's 120Vac.

If you go with a belt driven unit....the motor typically runs at a higher RPM so that eliminates some of the issues of lower voltage....

BUT....a 240Vac saw is nice....pretty much no limit to what you can do......

I would consider doing some surgery on those walls.....once you have a couple of 240Vac outlets in the right places, you start looking at other tools that could use it.....like a MIG welder....

electures 10-06-2012 11:35 AM

Change receptacle to 20a/240v. Change breaker to 20a 2 pole. Make extension cord. Good for your occasional use of table saw or anything else 240v.

silversport 10-06-2012 12:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1025062)
I would consider doing some surgery on those walls.....once you have a couple of 240Vac outlets in the right places, you start looking at other tools that could use it.....like a MIG welder....

I second this. When I put a subpanel in my garage I sacrificed a 6 inch wide strip of drywall all the way across one wall for two 240v 30a runs. One for an existing welder and one for future use (like a table saw or bigger compressor).

MT Stringer 10-06-2012 01:34 PM

Lots of good suggestions. Thanks.
Saws - I have been looking but up until today, I had not even considered a 220v model. My current saw is working ok with the exception that the two metal wings aren't level with the table and I haven't had any luck adjusting them. I have Vega Pro 40 fence system mounted to the saw and it works great. The saw sits just inside the garage door and faces inward. Anything longer than four feet requires me to open the door so I can start the rip. Outfeed/assembly/workbench is on the far side of the saw towards the middle of the garage. So, by far the easiest way to go is to buy another saw that runs on 110v and be done with it. AT 63, I would like to get a saw that I can enjoy for a few more years - one with cast iron wings that are flat to the saw's surface.

20a 220v with extension cord - That sound very dooable and probably the second best choice.

Open up wall - While it is a great idea, there are a row of heavy duty storage shelving units along the outside wall with all of our junk stored there. Having several dedicated receptacles would be great for a table saw and a dust collection system similar to the Harbor Freight or Grizzly models, but the initial job task is more than I want to consider at the moment.

So ranked from easiest to accomplish to the most difficult, this is the choices:

1 - buy another 110v saw and be done with it
2 - Change 220v breaker and run an extension cord to a new 220v saw
3 - modify or install wiring for dedicated 220v receptacles.

Thanks for all your comments. I will check in later. I have some sawdust to sling while the weather is pretty today.

Mike

Stubbie 10-06-2012 02:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electures (Post 1025069)
Change receptacle to 20a/240v. Change breaker to 20a 2 pole. Make extension cord. Good for your occasional use of table saw or anything else 240v.

I second that idea .... :thumbup:

riddlers 10-06-2012 03:29 PM

I keep answers contained to the question(s) asked. You asked about running extension cords for 220 Volt tools from your 220 Volt outlet for a dryer. Most 220 Volt outlets for dryers are 30 Amps or more.

You can easily run a 220 Volt extension cord. I have several shop tools with cords over 30 feet long and see little difference between that and an extension cord. Simply go to one of the big box stores and get 10 gauge or thicker "extension cord type" wire. I use 10-2 wire and utilize the ground wire though you could use 10-3 wire and have both ground and return. It's not needed though and not used for things like water heaters and air conditioners.

I offer a suggestion to you if you choose to do this route. Use twist locks on all receptacles. Those are less likely to come undone from tools. The look something like these:

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl...9,r:5,s:0,i:95

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl...9,r:0,s:0,i:79

Do not purchase them from the source of the pictures. They are available much cheaper at a big box store. You are looking for plugs rated for 30 amps. Make sure you purchase the right male plug for your saw that fits into the female receptacle you purchase. It's a very easy thing to accomplish.

MT Stringer 10-06-2012 04:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by riddlers (Post 1025214)
I keep answers contained to the question(s) asked. You asked about running extension cords for 220 Volt tools from your 220 Volt outlet for a dryer. Most 220 Volt outlets for dryers are 30 Amps or more.

You can easily run a 220 Volt extension cord. I have several shop tools with cords over 30 feet long and see little difference between that and an extension cord. Simply go to one of the big box stores and get 10 gauge or thicker "extension cord type" wire. I use 10-2 wire and utilize the ground wire though you could use 10-3 wire and have both ground and return. It's not needed though and not used for things like water heaters and air conditioners.

I offer a suggestion to you if you choose to do this route. Use twist locks on all receptacles. Those are less likely to come undone from tools. The look something like these:

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl...9,r:5,s:0,i:95

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl...9,r:0,s:0,i:79

Do not purchase them from the source of the pictures. They are available much cheaper at a big box store. You are looking for plugs rated for 30 amps. Make sure you purchase the right male plug for your saw that fits into the female receptacle you purchase. It's a very easy thing to accomplish.

Thanks. That would be easy to do.

Speedy Petey 10-06-2012 05:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by riddlers (Post 1025214)
I keep answers contained to the question(s) asked.

That's very good of you.
The other replies were helpful as well.:thumbsup:


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