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Old 04-17-2012, 01:53 PM   #1
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220v plug differences


I have a 220v Microwave, and a 220v dryer, that came with a four prong plug cords attached (they were used in newer homes).

The current outlets are three prong outlets and there is absolutely no way to run new wiring.


Just need to change the cords on the microwave and dryer to the old style three prong ones?




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Old 04-17-2012, 02:58 PM   #2
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220v plug differences


Can you find a 4 prong to 3 prong adapter that fits in the wall receptacle and you plug the appliance into that?

Note that for the dryer, depending on how many amperes it needs, its plug may or may not be the same as that for the microwave oven. But it's still a 240 volt plug.

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Old 04-17-2012, 03:36 PM   #3
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220v plug differences


It is compliant to install a 3 wire cord on a dryer to use with an existing properly wired 3 wire dryer receptacle.

Need more info on the MW. What is the NEMA configuration of the cord and receptacle
http://www.stayonline.com/reference-...ght-blade.aspx

Or post a picture of each.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:39 PM   #4
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220v plug differences


Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
Can you find a 4 prong to 3 prong adapter that fits in the wall receptacle and you plug the appliance into that?

Note that for the dryer, depending on how many amperes it needs, its plug may or may not be the same as that for the microwave oven. But it's still a 240 volt plug.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:49 PM   #5
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220v plug differences


To change the plug from a 4 prong to a 3 you need to install a bonding jumper from the neutral terminal to the dryer’s frame. The bonding jumper is either a metallic strap (typically copper or copperclad) or a green wire that is connected between your dryer’s neutral (white wire) terminal and the green ground screw connected to your dryer’s frame.
Installing this bonding jumper is an extremely important step when changing from a 4-wire to a 3-wire power cord to prevent electrical shocks when touching anything metallic on your dryer.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:24 PM   #6
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220v plug differences


What kind of micro was 240v? I have never seen a household micro that was 240v.
Also, a 240v micro would NOT have needed a 4-prong plug and cord.

Can you give us the specs on the micro?
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:37 PM   #7
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220v plug differences


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
What kind of micro was 240v? I have never seen a household micro that was 240v.
Also, a 240v micro would NOT have needed a 4-prong plug and cord.

Can you give us the specs on the micro?
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:49 PM   #8
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220v plug differences


GE Advanitum PSA2201RSS

http://www.number1direct.com/product...FeJe7Aod_wxHyQ



You guys don't get around much do you?.....



If you ever use one of these you would never go back to a conventional microwave.

Not just very fast, but you can cooks things like steaks, and they'll come out as if they were done on the grill.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:57 PM   #9
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220v plug differences


Quote:
Originally Posted by ktkelly View Post
The current outlets are three prong outlets and there is absolutely no way to run new wiring.

Can we assume when you say the current outlets are three prong that you are referring to a standard US 120 volt receptacle that is normally found in a kitchen?
Your microwave requires a 30 amp circuit which means #10 wire.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:10 PM   #10
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220v plug differences


Quote:
Originally Posted by ktkelly View Post
GE Advanitum PSA2201RSS

http://www.number1direct.com/product...FeJe7Aod_wxHyQ



You guys don't get around much do you?.....
I get around plenty, and I have seen 100's of OTR micros. It's just something doesn't add up.

It says 975 micro watts. Yet it requires a 240v 30A circuit?

Next, this is NOT just an OTR micro. It is also a convection oven, so it is a tad bit more than a "microwave". Something you neglected to mention originally.
Then it says something about a 1500 watt element.

The specifications seem more like an advertisement than technical specs.
Under power it simply says 30A, 240v, and 975 "Microwave Watts (IEC-705)", whatever that means.
975 divided by 240v = 4 amps. Where are the other 20 amps coming from???

Again, the specs say 240v, NOT 120/240v. So this unit requires two hots and a ground. A neutral is not required or needed.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:12 PM   #11
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220v plug differences


Speedy, I have installed several 120/240 volt 30 amp micros. They do exist. Page 3 of the installation instructions. Nema 14-30 cord cap.

Last edited by brric; 04-17-2012 at 06:15 PM.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:13 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brric View Post
Speedy, I have installed several 120/240 volt 30 amp micros. They do exist.
Straight micros? In a residence?
I have NEVER seen a 4000+ watt micro.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:16 PM   #13
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220v plug differences


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
Straight micros? In a residence?
I have NEVER seen a 4000+ watt micro.
See my edit to post #11. They're for the 1%. Not the 99% of us.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:19 PM   #14
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220v plug differences


If you install this you will need a new circuit. Here is some clips from the manual.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:20 PM   #15
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220v plug differences


Quote:
Originally Posted by brric View Post
See my edit to post #11. They're for the 1%. Not the 99% of us.
OK, this unit is still a convection oven and not just a micro.
And if the voltage is 208/240v WHY are the "recommending" a 14-30???

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