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-   -   220v circuit - one outlet only? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/220v-circuit-one-outlet-only-120464/)

hippodrome 10-18-2011 06:53 AM

220v circuit - one outlet only?
 
Wiring my garage shop. Had an electrician install a subpanel in garage. Now I'm adding circuits for 220v tools.

My understanding of code is that you must have a separate breaker for each 220v receptacle, right? If so, I'm going to have almost all of the subpanel occupied already. If I could put two tools on one circuit that would help. Can I?

Speedy Petey 10-18-2011 07:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hippodrome (Post 751119)

My understanding of code is that you must have a separate breaker for each 220v receptacle, right?

Where in the coded did you see this?
If you can find it and post it I'll buy you a coffee. :thumbsup:

Just Bill 10-18-2011 07:15 AM

You must have a breaker for each 120V or 240V circuit, not for each outlet. You can put as many tools as you want on one circuit(mutliple outlets), but you probably can't run them all at the same time.

rrolleston 10-18-2011 05:52 PM

What will your be powering with 220. If you are using different amperage equipment then they should be separate. You can't have 15, 20, 30 amp outlets all on the same circuit. I have seen people do some weird stuff taking a 30 amp 220 circuit and then also having 20 amp and some 15 amp 110 stuff wired to it. If this is something you are talking about then don't do it.

forresth 10-18-2011 06:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rrolleston (Post 751532)
What will your be powering with 220. If you are using different amperage equipment then they should be separate. You can't have 15, 20, 30 amp outlets all on the same circuit. I have seen people do some weird stuff taking a 30 amp 220 circuit and then also having 20 amp and some 15 amp 110 stuff wired to it. If this is something you are talking about then don't do it.

I have no problem plugging my 1 amp battery charger into standard my 20 amp circuit.

Why can't I change the plug on my 20 amp planer to plug into my 50 amp welder outlet?

If you are talking a 4 wire circuit, they are intended to supply both 110v and 220v power. There is no reason I couldn't stick a 14-50p onto my clock radio and plug it into my range outlet, apart from it would look silly:jester:

rrolleston 10-18-2011 06:12 PM

If you ever get a short in your 20 amp planer while plugged into a 50 amp outlet burnt wires don't smell too good. Not a really good idea especially with high amp circuits.

Speedy Petey 10-18-2011 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rrolleston (Post 751552)
If you ever get a short in your 20 amp planer while plugged into a 50 amp outlet burnt wires don't smell too good. Not a really good idea especially with high amp circuits.

The breaker does NOT protect the equipment, it protects the circuit conductors.

My Miller welder has a #10 cord and plugs into a 50A receptacle. Are you suggesting this is not safe?

rrolleston 10-18-2011 07:09 PM

I prefer to have the over current protection of 220v equipment match the equipment that is plugged in. I thought this was code.

clashley 10-18-2011 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rrolleston (Post 751592)
I prefer to have the over current protection of 220v equipment match the equipment that is plugged in. I thought this was code.

You need to match the receptacle, not the load.

Speedy Petey 10-18-2011 07:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rrolleston (Post 751592)
I prefer to have the over current protection of 220v equipment match the equipment that is plugged in. I thought this was code.

No, it is not code at all.

How is a 240v circuit ANY different from a 120v circuit???

What about a 1/4A bath fan, or clock radio, or TV, plugged into a 20A branch circuit? How is that any different than the OP's scenario?

a7ecorsair 10-18-2011 08:18 PM

In addition, what about a NEMA 5-20T or 6-20T these accept either a 15 or 20 amp plug.

rdhd 10-18-2011 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hippodrome (Post 751119)
Wiring my garage shop. Had an electrician install a subpanel in garage. Now I'm adding circuits for 220v tools.

My understanding of code is that you must have a separate breaker for each 220v receptacle, right? If so, I'm going to have almost all of the subpanel occupied already. If I could put two tools on one circuit that would help. Can I?

Call the Licenced Electrical Contractor back and explain exactly what you need.

If you do the work and something happens or fails I am certain that your Insurance will not cover it.

This is why professional contractors do their apprenticeships. It is not for learning how to marette wires together or how to staple wire to wood , they are learning code for your specific region.

It may cost you a few hundred dollars but it may save you tens of thousands.

Speedy Petey 10-18-2011 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rdhd (Post 751643)

If you do the work and something happens or fails I am certain that your Insurance will not cover it.

This is not at all true. At least in the US.

rdhd 10-18-2011 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey (Post 751651)
This is not at all true. At least in the US.

I am in Canada, if the insurance company can prove that the homeowner did the work themselves (or an unlicensed friend) they will not honour the policy. There may be exceptions in certain circumstance.

The best solution is to follow the local code, licensed or not.

a7ecorsair 10-18-2011 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rdhd (Post 751686)
I am in Canada, if the insurance company can prove that the homeowner did the work themselves they will not honour the policy. There may be exceptions in certain circumstance.

The best solution is to follow the local code, licensed or not.

Update your profile so we know your location. It makes a big difference on this forum...


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