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Old 04-04-2010, 07:57 AM   #1
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220V circuit in a garage


Hi, I want to run a 220V circuit in my garage for a table saw and maybe an electric heater. and don't know if I should run 2 or 3 wire.
Thanks

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Old 04-04-2010, 08:30 AM   #2
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220V circuit in a garage


If they both are straight 240 volt and do not need a neutral you could run xx-2 with ground cable.

Have you considered adding a subpanel instead of individual circuits? Might give you more flexibility in the future.

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Old 04-04-2010, 08:34 AM   #3
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220V circuit in a garage


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Hi, I want to run a 220V circuit in my garage for a table saw and maybe an electric heater. and don't know if I should run 2 or 3 wire.
Thanks
Don't forget. "220" is actually an old term and only half the equation. You need to know the amperage of the circuit you are going to need.
A table saw will likely require a 20A-240v circuit, where a shop heater can require up to a 50A-240v circuit. Depends on how big the heater is, and how big the saw motor is.

Just saying "220" is almost meaningless.
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:02 AM   #4
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220V circuit in a garage


Thanks for the input. i do have a sub panel, and was going to run #10 wire, but was not sure which 220 plugs required the white as a netural.
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:09 AM   #5
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220V circuit in a garage


So you already have a sub in your garage, just running circuits....how big is the sub (amps)
#10 wire will give you 30a of power
Wiring depends upon the item you are connecting
The 240v heaters I have did not require a neutral
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:10 AM   #6
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220V circuit in a garage


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Thanks for the input. i do have a sub panel, and was going to run #10 wire, but was not sure which 220 plugs required the white as a netural.
That depends upon the inividual equipment. 120/240 volt equipment requires a neutral. Such as an electric dryer as opposed to some motors which may be wired for either voltage.
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:28 AM   #7
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220V circuit in a garage


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Thanks for the input. i do have a sub panel, and was going to run #10 wire, but was not sure which 220 plugs required the white as a netural.
Very few 240v circuits will require a neutral. Those that do are 120/240v circuits.
Household dryers and cooking appliances are those that typically do. Not much else does.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:02 AM   #8
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220V circuit in a garage


Thanks for all of the quick and imformative replys, I really appreciate it.
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Old 12-13-2010, 10:41 AM   #9
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220V circuit in a garage


I'm sorry if I'm hijacking this thread but my situation is similar and I didn't want to start another on the same subject.

I am looking to add a 220V circuit to my garage for a heater. The heater is the Cadet garage heater and uses a 20A 220V plug. I currently don't have a circuit like this, but can install one coming off my sub-panel in my basement. I am also planning on refinishing my basement and installing two Cadet 240V baseboard heaters. If I install a 20A circuit for the garage heater and install the baseboard heaters on the same circuit, I know I will need at least a double pole 20A breaker, however my calculations tell me that a 4000W heater (garage) and 2 750W heaters give me 5500W (22A) which would mean I need a double pole 30A (80% of 30=24A) breaker in my sub-panel and 10-2 AWG NMB wire. This is fine as my sub-panel is being fed with 6 gauge THHN wire with a double pole 60A breaker in my main 100A panel. If I go this route, will using the garage heater that requires a 20A 240V circuit be alright? I've read on here where if there were problems, the breaker wouldn't trip until the threshold was reached and by that time severe problems could occur. On the same note, I have a dryer circuit with the same double pole 30A breaker which I could branch from (assuming the garage heater and dryer aren't being used at the same time).

Thanks.

Bill
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Old 12-13-2010, 10:46 AM   #10
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220V circuit in a garage


You would be better off to keep the garage heater as a separate circuit from the basement baseboards, even if you were within circuit limits.

You cannot use the dryer circuit. The dryer requires a dedicated circuit.
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Old 12-13-2010, 11:14 AM   #11
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220V circuit in a garage


I was afraid of that response! I don't have enough room in my sub-panel box for my planned basement! I guess I could get a new box! Other than 1 circuit, I have an empty box and am using the Cutler Hammer CH12L125BP panel. I could upgrade the box to the CH24L125CP.

Bill

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