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Old 08-29-2013, 03:41 PM   #1
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220v 50Hz Tool on 240v 60hz circuit


What might be the consequences of running a German heat gun on a US 240v circuit? I don't imagine the difference in frequency would be much a problem for the blower motor. My concern is that the German device is not designed for split-phase power. What is likely to happen if I plug this guy in?
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:07 PM   #2
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220v 50Hz Tool on 240v 60hz circuit


How are you going to plug it in? I can't imagine the German plug fits any American receptacle.
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:10 PM   #3
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220v 50Hz Tool on 240v 60hz circuit


It should work fine. The only significant difference is that both of the conductors will be at 120V with respect to ground instead of one being 240V to ground and the other zero. This could theoretically create a safety issue if the device relies in some way on the neutral conductor being "neutral" - but modern safety standards do not allow manufacturers to treat the neutral as "safe", because of the possibility of connection to a reverse-wired source. So if the device is newer and in good condition, it should be safe on split-phase power. People do this all the time, for what it's worth.
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:33 PM   #4
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220v 50Hz Tool on 240v 60hz circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by md2lgyk View Post
How are you going to plug it in? I can't imagine the German plug fits any American receptacle.
That's the easy part. I'll either put a new plug on the end, or I'll use an adapter like this one to go from from a CEE 7/4 plug to NEMA 6-20 receptacle:

http://www.adaptelec.com/wa21-travel...q2q5l2pj8438n2


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Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
It should work fine. The only significant difference is that both of the conductors will be at 120V with respect to ground instead of one being 240V to ground and the other zero. This could theoretically create a safety issue if the device relies in some way on the neutral conductor being "neutral" - but modern safety standards do not allow manufacturers to treat the neutral as "safe", because of the possibility of connection to a reverse-wired source. So if the device is newer and in good condition, it should be safe on split-phase power. People do this all the time, for what it's worth.
Cool. Thanks for the thorough explanation.

Last edited by benjamincall; 08-29-2013 at 04:35 PM.
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