Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-23-2008, 11:52 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 5
Share |
Default

220V 100A Circuit


I'm building a shop for to be used for various automotive projects. I need to end up with 1 220V and 1 110V wire leading in to the shop. I already have prebuilt boxes (possibly called breaker, not familiar with electrical terminology i'm afraid) that will split the 220V and 110V sources in to many outlets. I'm going to need 80 amps via the 220V source and 20 amps via the 110v source. The house has 200 amp service and I have enough capacity as under 100 amps are currently used. What I need is a walkthrough (preferably with pictures, although anything will help) as to everything I need to do to take my existing 200 amp box in the garage and end up with these 2 wires running out of the garage. Preferably without adding another box in the garage, although I can do so if nescessary. I don't need any help with the construction/how to run wires side, just the electrical wiring/hardware side. If no one can provide what I need, links or a point toward certain books that would teach this would be greatly appreciated, and don't worry guys, i wont be doing this until I feel I have enough knowledge to do so safely and even then it will be checked by a qualified electrician before any switches get flipped.

Thanks,
Rob

Last edited by canadaisintexas; 03-23-2008 at 11:55 PM.
canadaisintexas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 05:31 AM   #2
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Well, you can't take and "split" the a 240v circuit into 2... what you would need is a subpanel. You mentioned that you have a "prebuilt box" that will split it? Is this possible a subpanel? What you would need is to run a 100AMP sub panel to your shop. There are a few generic walk though/faq's on subpanels around somewhere.

You are going to need 3 wire + ground for this.
__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 07:43 AM   #3
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,674
Default

220V 100A Circuit


http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homew...rage/index.htm
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 08:46 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 200
Default

220V 100A Circuit


This is a CLASSIC.
JGarth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 10:00 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 5
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by JGarth View Post
This is a CLASSIC.
To everyone else: Thanks for the help, ill check out that link.

Garth: I sincerely thank you for your extremely helpful input, now if you could kindly find someone else's thread to go "help" I would much appreciate it

Thanks,
Rob
canadaisintexas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 10:46 AM   #6
UAW SKILLED TRADES
 
Stubbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kansas
Posts: 4,834
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Welcome to the forum Rob

You are welcome to ask your questions here. Shows you want to know how to do this safely. Understand though that what your doing is a bit more than changing out a light switch. I have no way of knowing your skill level with electrical but from your post you are pretty new. That's OK we all started at the beginning sometime.....

I would suggest at least going to the big box store and buying a few books that will show how to install a sub-panel in a detached building. Use these to guide you and get a little info on how things are done and more importantly why they are done. It is critical that you have an understanding of what your looking at when you take the cover off that garage breaker box. Just having someone say connect this here and that there is no way to do electrical work. You need to understand why your connecting things to certain points. Electricity will kill you. If you energize the installation and it is wired wrong it may kill someone else. So respect what your doing.... electricity isn't comparable to a plumbing leak.

The fact that you are asking questions on this forum shows me you have the common sense to do a little research and get advice. That is a big step in the right direction.

You are going to need to install a "sub-panel" in your shop.

We will be glad to help you. Ask your questions... most of us will not belittle you . I only ask that you be honest with yourself... if our answers to your questions cause confusion please get an electrician to install this sub-panel. And be darn sure your local codes department inspects the installation regardless... for sake of safety to others and yourself.

If I thought it was feasible I would have the a DIY forum rules require posting of the "permit for inspection" before answering a "how to install" question like yours. I'm not trying to be mean.... just that it is that important.
Stubbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 10:54 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 5
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Stubbie: Do you have any recommendations of specific books or just any general book on the subject from a big box store?

As far as safety, the $ isn't the reason I want to do this myself, it's a desire to learn new things. Everything I do will be thoroughly checked by a qualified electrician before any power gets turned back on, and like I said, i'm not even going to start trying to do this until I feel like I have a good enough knowledge of what's going on to be able to do so safely.

Thanks,
Rob
canadaisintexas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 11:45 AM   #8
UAW SKILLED TRADES
 
Stubbie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Kansas
Posts: 4,834
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Hi Rob

That's fair enough in my book.

As for books I would just go through the ones they have available and see if in the table of contents if they have a sub-panel install. Then buy the one you think is best for your needs. It doesn't have to be to a detached building install we will tell you any differences as we go.

Lets start the process of getting you on the right track.

I believe you said this is mainly a one man shop. You have a total load of 80 amps for your 220 equipment. And 20 amps for 120 volt items.

If you want you might break these loads down for us so we know what you are going to be operating in the shop.

A 100 amp sub-panel should be fine as I don't fore see you using all 80 amps of the 220 equipment at once plus the 120.

To get started with some questions.....

1.) Sounds like the shop is detached and separate from your home is that correct...?

2.) Are you wanting an overhead supply to the shop or conduit underground or do you want to direct bury wires? My recommendation is underground in PVC conduit if possible.

3.) How far from the 200 amp panel to the location where you think you would mount the breaker panel ('sub-panel') in the shop? You don't have to be dead accurate but a good approximation.

Last edited by Stubbie; 03-24-2008 at 03:04 PM.
Stubbie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 04:56 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 5
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Shop will actually be attatched, and the sub panel will be approximately 40 feet away from the main.
canadaisintexas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 05:27 PM   #10
When is fishing season?
 
CowboyAndy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 613
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Then you don't need a ground rod, just a 3 wire + ground cable.


The neutrals and grounds in the sub panel must be seperate.
__________________
I DON'T OWN MY HOUSE...
MY HOUSE OWNS ME!
CowboyAndy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 05:42 PM   #11
Master Of Nothing
 
mr500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 141
Default

220V 100A Circuit


If it is attached cant he just run a 3 wire set up on this?
__________________
Im Not An Electrician...But I Did Stay At A Holiday Inn Express Last Night!!
mr500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 05:44 PM   #12
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,674
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by mr500 View Post
If it is attached cant he just run a 3 wire set up on this?
3-wire PLUS a ground.
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 05:47 PM   #13
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 5
Default

220V 100A Circuit


So i need to find a book that covers wiring a "3 wire plus ground subpanel"?

Also, I was told that if the subpanel is in the shop I can split between 240 and 120 in the subpanel in the shop and don't need to run seperate wiring for 240 and for 120 all the way from the main to the subpanel, is this correct?

Thanks for all the help!

Last edited by canadaisintexas; 03-24-2008 at 05:50 PM.
canadaisintexas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 06:35 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 1,802
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by canadaisintexas View Post
So i need to find a book that covers wiring a "3 wire plus ground subpanel"?

Also, I was told that if the subpanel is in the shop I can split between 240 and 120 in the subpanel in the shop and don't need to run seperate wiring for 240 and for 120 all the way from the main to the subpanel, is this correct?

Thanks for all the help!
Yes. You'll be able to run both 240 and 120 from the subpanel. Just a question...what are you going to run with 240 that you will need 80A? Welders, compressors?

Last edited by jerryh3; 03-24-2008 at 06:37 PM.
jerryh3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2008, 06:39 PM   #15
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 6,674
Default

220V 100A Circuit


Quote:
Originally Posted by canadaisintexas View Post
So i need to find a book that covers wiring a "3 wire plus ground subpanel"?

Also, I was told that if the subpanel is in the shop I can split between 240 and 120 in the subpanel in the shop and don't need to run seperate wiring for 240 and for 120 all the way from the main to the subpanel, is this correct?

Thanks for all the help!
Yes. That is the point of the sub-panel.
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need a wiring diagram Mooreski Electrical 46 03-12-2011 03:25 PM
Problem with circuit breaker. HELP! spartanic Electrical 2 10-28-2007 03:09 PM
Black and white romex for 220v circuit? NateHanson Electrical 2 05-02-2007 04:43 PM
So lost - electrical requirements please help lapsis9 HVAC 4 12-20-2006 08:09 PM
Adding new circuit breakers to 100 amp sub panel DrP Electrical 8 05-25-2006 10:05 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.