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Old 09-29-2012, 04:12 PM   #1
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220 wiring question.


I have just bought a new sewing machine that runs on 220 single phase.
My other machine runs on 110 connected to an exstention cord to the wall.
So I have to run a new electrical line through conduit, to connect the new machine. I have bought a 20 amp double breaker, 12 gauge wire (2 blacks and a green) and the 220 plug.

Can I run 1 more wire(white) with my others going into a double gang box. I would like to have a 220 outlet and also have a 110 outlet in the same outlet box.
I would splice into one one of the black wires for the 220 and use is for one of the legs for the 110 along withe the white wire.
Is this alright to do, or a no no?

Scott

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Old 09-29-2012, 04:34 PM   #2
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220 wiring question.


Probably not. It would seem that the sewing machine requires its own circuit.

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Old 09-29-2012, 04:39 PM   #3
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220 wiring question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott.K View Post
I have just bought a new sewing machine that runs on 220 single phase.
My other machine runs on 110 connected to an exstention cord to the wall.
So I have to run a new electrical line through conduit, to connect the new machine. I have bought a 20 amp double breaker, 12 gauge wire (2 blacks and a green) and the 220 plug.

Can I run 1 more wire(white) with my others going into a double gang box. I would like to have a 220 outlet and also have a 110 outlet in the same outlet box.
I would splice into one one of the black wires for the 220 and use is for one of the legs for the 110 along withe the white wire.
Is this alright to do, or a no no?

Scott
You likely need to run a 3 wire to the panel and attach it to your 2 pole 20.(2 hots/white/bare)
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Old 09-29-2012, 04:52 PM   #4
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220 wiring question.


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Originally Posted by AltaSparky View Post
You likely need to run a 3 wire to the panel and attach it to your 2 pole 20.(2 hots/white/bare)
Why would you guess that it requires a neutral? The OP said it was "220 single phase".

OP, does the name plate call for 240 or 120/240?
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Old 09-29-2012, 05:34 PM   #5
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220 wiring question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rjniles

Why would you guess that it requires a neutral? The OP said it was "220 single phase".

OP, does the name plate call for 240 or 120/240?
I said it likely does.
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Old 09-29-2012, 08:31 PM   #6
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220 wiring question.


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Originally Posted by AltaSparky View Post
I said it likely does.
I'd say it very likely does not. Why would a sewing machine need 120 in addition to the 240 for the motor? It's not likely to have a bunch of control circuitry or anything. Regardless, it would be convenient to install a 120/240V receptacle (twist-lock is nice) just in case other equipment later needs the neutral.

As to the OP's question: I would say you CAN add a 120V receptacle to your 240V circuit for this sewing machine. It depends on how much current the sewing machine requires. If it's a large load, then it really should have its own circuit. But if it's not (and I really doubt it uses most of the capacity of a 20A 240V circuit), then it would be fine to run a neutral wire and add the 120V receptacles on there.

You can even do another trick to increase the usefulness of the receptacle: Break the tab in the middle of the receptacle on the hot side, and connect each half of the receptacle to its own hot wire. This allows you to run a 120V 20A load on the top AND bottom parts of the receptacle simultaneously, essentially giving you two separate 20A circuits in one receptacle.

I wired three sets of receptacles in my old garage this way: 20A double pole breakers each feeding a double gang box with one 20A 240V receptacle and one split duplex 20A 120V receptacle. It was very handy. I could plug a plasma cutter and it's air compressor into the same duplex receptacle and they each got their own 20A circuit, or use the 240V receptacle for the heavier stuff.
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Old 09-29-2012, 08:46 PM   #7
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220 wiring question.


I am wondering the why of a "220" volt sewing machine motor. Its not like it is a high power application.
I wonder if it is a European machine and really is 220 and not 240 US standard. If it is the motor could overheat on 240. Also in Europe the frequency is 50 hz instead of the 60 hz in the USA. The wrong frequency will make the motor run fast and it might overheat.
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Old 09-30-2012, 03:00 AM   #8
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220 wiring question.


Thank you all for your replies.

The machine that I bought is about ten years old and was used in a factory.
It is a more advance machine than my other standard industrial machine that runs on just 110.

This machine has a servo motor, thread cutter, back tack and many more features. It is a production machine, the sewing head is made in Japan and the servo motor and controller are made in Germany. The company could have switched some things out so it could run on 110, but I wanted to keep it original so I would not loose any features and power for the machine.

The whole purpose for this question was, I was trying to eliminate the extension cord for the machine running on 110. Since I was running new conduit for the 220 outlet that will be under a sewing table next to both machines. It would be nice to have the 220 & 110 in the same location.
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Old 09-30-2012, 06:55 AM   #9
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220 wiring question.


Since you are installing conduit, just pull 3 hots and your neutral and ground. This way you can have two totally independent circuits.
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:08 AM   #10
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220 wiring question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott.K View Post
The whole purpose for this question was, I was trying to eliminate the extension cord for the machine running on 110. Since I was running new conduit for the 220 outlet that will be under a sewing table next to both machines. It would be nice to have the 220 & 110 in the same location.
I think this is what you want.
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220 wiring question.-240and120ononecircuit.jpg  
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:16 AM   #11
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220 wiring question.


Hacking the wiring together like the diagram may only cause problems. If you have to pull new wires to the new machine, pull a 120v circuit as well. I will warn you, if the new machine requires a twist lock plug, you will have a hard time finding a plate to cover a 2G box with a 240V Twist Lock, and a duplex receptacle.
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Old 09-30-2012, 02:19 PM   #12
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220 wiring question.


Thank you all for your help.
I got up at 6:30 am this morning and went to my office.
So I decided to run another wire, picked up a 15 amp breaker and some more 12 gauge wire and another box.
So now I have (4) 110 outlets in one box and next to that box I have the 220 outlet.
All wired correctly and the project is done. Wish I did this from the start. It never pays to try and take short cuts.

Thanks again for all of your replies.

Scott
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:09 PM   #13
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220 wiring question.


Scott.K Thanks for reporting the result of your wiring project. Too many run away with the info learned here and never give results.
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:22 PM   #14
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220 wiring question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott.K
Thank you all for your help.
I got up at 6:30 am this morning and went to my office.
So I decided to run another wire, picked up a 15 amp breaker and some more 12 gauge wire and another box.
So now I have (4) 110 outlets in one box and next to that box I have the 220 outlet.
All wired correctly and the project is done. Wish I did this from the start. It never pays to try and take short cuts.

Thanks again for all of your replies.

Scott
You can not run #12 wire on a 15 amp breaker.
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:23 PM   #15
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220 wiring question.


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You can not run #12 wire on a 15 amp breaker.
You sure the can!

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