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Old 03-23-2008, 06:52 PM   #16
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220 shop circuit conduit


The duty cord on the spool is what I saw at the big box store. It was quite a bit cheaper than the thnn but I may go with what you recommend. I think I have a good handle on what I need to do. Thanks all for your patient help!
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Old 03-23-2008, 07:29 PM   #17
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stubbie impressed with your help to mikew. delta or wye wired? keep up good work stubbie. fun to read.
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Old 03-23-2008, 09:13 PM   #18
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Mike

You do not use the cord in place of the thhn you use it from the ceiling jb down to the tool then again as the power cord for the tool. Use the thhn in the conduit only. Don't cut any corners for the strain relief at the ceiling JB or in a very short while the cord will start to split and you may cause a short circuit or ground fault.

Brad.....'m not sure what your asking about whether delta or wye ??

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Old 03-23-2008, 11:21 PM   #19
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Got it. Don't be cheap, do it right. I hear you on the strain relief. The shop from which these tools came had the orange cord coming directly down from a jb, with just a romex clamp on it. Even I wondered if that was correct. Off on a week road trip, then I'll dive into this. Thanks again for all the help!
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:34 AM   #20
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stubbie new at this .Sonded like mikew was ready to go to work and leave computer. bought equement from industrial / comercial area a lot of these areas by me are feed with 240 delta trans (high leg ) Sounds like there could be a chance. Quick to check, Could be fatal to eqement if missed. ask mikew to look at ties in pecker head. Have a good day stubbie and a good trip mikew.
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Old 03-24-2008, 09:08 AM   #21
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He is in a residential setting feeding the shop panel from a 3 wire 120/240 volt single phase transformer. He wouldn't have any concern about high leg deltas or 3 phase configurations. There might be a slim chance he was dealing with a wye 120/208 but I would bet against that being the case.
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:50 PM   #22
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stubbie: this was a logical concern of mine until my second cup of coffee had kicked in twenty miniutes into my hour long commute. Then it hit me like a ton of bricks - What an idiot I am! Thanks for not hammering me. I promise I will have a few cups of coffee before responding to anyone in the future.
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Old 04-02-2008, 01:05 PM   #23
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I finally got home and tore into the project and completed it today. I took all the great advice and help here it turned out well (it looks good and the machines run and no sparks fly...). I ran 3/4" conduit and thhn wire, and used the soow wire as drop cord from the box (wow, that stuff is expensive -- $1.65/ft.).

The guys at Home Depot looked at me like I had a hole in my head when I asked about strain relief connectors for the drop cords. Never heard of such a thing. Since the next supply place is 120 miles away, I improvised with extension springs from the hardware store attached to eyebolts in the ceiling. The cord is attached to that with some small nylon cord using a prussik (climbers will know what that is) and it works just fine.

I ended up using a 40 amp breaker for the saw, as that is what Powermatic recommends for that model, even though the motor plate shows 24 amps. It's their stuff so they must know.

Anyway, thanks again for everyone's patience assistance.
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Old 04-03-2008, 08:04 AM   #24
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220 shop circuit conduit


Funny,

"The guys at Home Depot looked at me like I had a hole in my head when I asked about strain relief connectors for the drop cords. Never heard of such a thing"
These are the wire grips that look like the Chinese finger grippers.

Of course since they don't sell them. Ironically, they are used all over the store where they want a drop line for a display or other purpose in the middle of an aisle. All they would need to do is look up to the rafters- that is where I have seen them in use at every HD I have been in. These were installed by electricians though. This one is by Pass and Seymour.
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Old 04-03-2008, 08:51 AM   #25
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Great Job Mike

Sorry about the strain relief issue. The HD here in my part of the world sells the strain relief stuff by the conduit fittings.

Doing what you did is just fine with the springs, the idea is to keep the cord from pulling loose from the clamp at the jb and to keep it from bending to sharply.

Using the 40 amp breaker on the saw is normal for a large motor with high start currents. Just remember for your future knowledge this application of using a larger breaker is unique to just a few areas... motors being one of them.
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