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Old 09-26-2009, 01:54 AM   #1
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220 receptacle


I have to wire up my welder. It has a 220 plug which has 2 blades at the top and your typical ground round blade at the bottom. Which of the 2 upper blades is the hot/black wire go to? One blade is longer/wider than the other? I am guessing the wider blade is the hot/black and the narrower blade is the neutral/white?

any help is appreciated..thnxxx

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Old 09-26-2009, 06:34 AM   #2
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There is no neutral in a 240v circuit. Just two hots and a ground.
It does not matter which hot goes to which blade.

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Old 09-26-2009, 02:13 PM   #3
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So what you are saying is that I attach both the black and white wires to the blades on the receptacle. It matters not which one goes where? By all searching on google, it seems that it doesn't matter which hot black/white goes to which blade? I did good on all the 110 receptacles but they are pretty much idiot proof. Only issue I had was attaching both ground wires onto the single ground screw/tab. I am using 12/2 and the wires seem a little stiff and large to easy attach to the one ground screw/point.
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Old 09-26-2009, 05:43 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by stqevo View Post
So what you are saying is that I attach both the black and white wires to the blades on the receptacle. It matters not which one goes where? By all searching on google, it seems that it doesn't matter which hot black/white goes to which blade? I did good on all the 110 receptacles but they are pretty much idiot proof. Only issue I had was attaching both ground wires onto the single ground screw/tab. I am using 12/2 and the wires seem a little stiff and large to easy attach to the one ground screw/point.

Really the two hots should be black and red, or just two blacks. White is only for use as a neutral. The receptacle you describe sounds like a 50A, which would require #6 wire (unless you are using the special calculations for welders).
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Old 09-26-2009, 05:45 PM   #5
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Really the two hots should be black and red, or just two blacks. White is only for use as a neutral.
This is not at all true.
Using XX/2 cable you most certainly CAN re-mark a white wire as a hot in a 240v circuit.
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Old 09-26-2009, 06:00 PM   #6
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220 receptacle


As stated above, the black goes to one, white to the other. It doesn't matter which. They're both hot.

Mark the white some other color at the receptacle and the panel. Red is sort of the unwritten standard. A felt-tip pen or red tape works. The reason is so anyone who works on this later will know that the white is not a neutral.

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Old 09-26-2009, 08:14 PM   #7
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220 receptacle


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So what you are saying is that I attach both the black and white wires to the blades on the receptacle. It matters not which one goes where? By all searching on google, it seems that it doesn't matter which hot black/white goes to which blade? I did good on all the 110 receptacles but they are pretty much idiot proof. Only issue I had was attaching both ground wires onto the single ground screw/tab. I am using 12/2 and the wires seem a little stiff and large to easy attach to the one ground screw/point.
You should not be putting more than one wire under a screw. Pigtail multiple wires together with a short piece going to the screw.
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Old 09-27-2009, 01:50 AM   #8
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This is not at all true.
Using XX/2 cable you most certainly CAN re-mark a white wire as a hot in a 240v circuit.
The NEC explicitly prohibits the use of white or gray for any purpose other than neutral. Re-marking effectively changes the color of the conductor, and that is allowed. However, if this is a 50A circuit (as the receptacle type would suggest), then the appropriately sized wire for the job isn't gonna need re-marked...
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Old 09-27-2009, 05:30 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
The NEC explicitly prohibits the use of white or gray for any purpose other than neutral. Re-marking effectively changes the color of the conductor, and that is allowed. However, if this is a 50A circuit (as the receptacle type would suggest), then the appropriately sized wire for the job isn't gonna need re-marked...
Speedy Petey knows all about 200.7(C)(1).
As to" However, if this is a 50A circuit (as the receptacle type would suggest), then the appropriately sized wire for the job isn't gonna need re-marked...", what about this cable, 6/2 w/ground:
220 receptacle-cable82.jpg
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Old 09-27-2009, 08:05 AM   #10
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Thank you Code05.

Actually, any white conductor in a cable used as ungrounded would need to be re-marked to a hot, regardless of size. 200.7 makes no reference to size, and 200.6 is only "Means of Identifying".
The #6 in question would also be precluded from being marked with tape, although I have yet to meet an inspector that would call that out.

For reference:

200.7 Use of Insulation of a White or Gray Color or with Three Continuous White Stripes.

(C) Circuits of 50 Volts or More.
The use of insulation that is white or gray or that has three continuous white stripes for other than a grounded conductor for circuits of 50 volts or more shall be permitted only as in (1) through (3).

(1) If part of a cable assembly and where the insulation is permanently reidentified to indicate its use as an ungrounded conductor, by painting or other effective means at its termination, and at each location where the conductor is visible and accessible. Identification shall encircle the insulation and shall be a color other than white, gray, or green.

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