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Old 09-09-2009, 09:56 AM   #1
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


We're re-wiring the kitchen, don't even ask me what _was_ on the single circuit that used to be there, I think they got paid by the avg number of outlets per circuit!

Anyway, I was thinking about wiring in the receptacles as split receptacles, that way the top and bottom of each would be on a different circuit; figured that adds to flexibility. However, I believe I cannot install a split across two different circuits (we're 2008 NEC) because you need to be able to kill them w/one breaker. However, can you feed two different receptacles in one box from two different circuits? I could put two receptacles in each box and achieve the same result.

This is a DIY job and a small kitchen, the added wire cost to pull 12/2 around the kitchen twice isn't a consideration.

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Old 09-09-2009, 11:21 AM   #2
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


The countertop circuits need to be GFI protected. A GFI receptacle will not allow the top and bottom to be split into 2 circuits.

You could just run your circuit A-B-A-B so that every other receptacle is on the other circuit.

The 08 requires at least 2 20 amp circuits for the kitchen to serve only the receptacles. No lighting allowed.

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Old 09-09-2009, 11:32 AM   #3
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The countertop circuits need to be GFI protected. A GFI receptacle will not allow the top and bottom to be split into 2 circuits.
Good point. I guess 2x GFCI breakers would work, or some other funky way of wiring it would work (say split downstream from 2 non-split GFCI receptacles) but that just seems ugly.

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You could just run your circuit A-B-A-B so that every other receptacle is on the other circuit.

The 08 requires at least 2 20 amp circuits for the kitchen to serve only the receptacles. No lighting allowed.
Right. We'll likely do ABAB then, but there will be an A and a B in each box.


IIRC, there's nothing that says _all_ circuits must be 20, right? The refrigerator can be plugged into a 15, so long as there are 2x 20s for the counter top.
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Old 09-09-2009, 11:35 AM   #4
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


GFCI is required for the kitchen and the only way to make a split GFCI is a GFCI breaker. When you see the cost of a double pole GFCI I think you will change your mind.
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Old 09-09-2009, 11:37 AM   #5
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I would not go to all that trouble. Run 2 circuits to the kitchen, then alternate the receptacle locations, so that no 2 circuits will be next to each other.
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Old 09-09-2009, 11:48 AM   #6
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


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I would not go to all that trouble. Run 2 circuits to the kitchen, then alternate the receptacle locations, so that no 2 circuits will be next to each other.
Not much trouble. We'd want double receptacles anyway, we've got them now, and are used to them. The way the layout is we'd be pulling both wires all the way around the kitchen anyway. So we're adding a couple of hooks on some screws in by doing this. (Wire into box, hook around screw, another hook around other screw on same side, wire out of box)

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Old 09-09-2009, 12:39 PM   #7
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


i think just doing the ababab strategy is the best
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Old 09-09-2009, 12:59 PM   #8
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


Quote:
Originally Posted by WaldenL View Post
We're re-wiring the kitchen, don't even ask me what _was_ on the single circuit that used to be there, I think they got paid by the avg number of outlets per circuit!

Anyway, I was thinking about wiring in the receptacles as split receptacles, that way the top and bottom of each would be on a different circuit; figured that adds to flexibility. However, I believe I cannot install a split across two different circuits (we're 2008 NEC) because you need to be able to kill them w/one breaker. However, can you feed two different receptacles in one box from two different circuits? I could put two receptacles in each box and achieve the same result.

This is a DIY job and a small kitchen, the added wire cost to pull 12/2 around the kitchen twice isn't a consideration.
What you CAN legally do (if you put each branch circuit on a separate Duplex receptacle) is run 3-wire into each 2-gang box. But be certain to connect each circuit on a different leg (in the panel). Ohterwise, you'll double the load on the NEUTRAL, instead of balancing it! (No matter what)Don't Drink and Drive, Ever!!!
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Old 09-09-2009, 01:43 PM   #9
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What you CAN legally do (if you put each branch circuit on a separate Duplex receptacle) is run 3-wire into each 2-gang box. But be certain to connect each circuit on a different leg (in the panel). Ohterwise, you'll double the load on the NEUTRAL, instead of balancing it! (No matter what)Don't Drink and Drive, Ever!!!
How would you provide the required GFI protection on a shared neutral?
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Old 09-09-2009, 01:58 PM   #10
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How would you provide the required GFI protection on a shared neutral?
2-Pole GFCI Breaker. But as some other posters have suggested that the cost is prohibitive. IMHO. Not necessarily. If you're doing a project in your own home.(No matter what)don't Drink and Drive, Ever!!!

Last edited by spark plug; 09-09-2009 at 02:00 PM. Reason: Typographical error (TYPO)
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Old 09-09-2009, 02:08 PM   #11
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Forget the split receps. Install double duplexes (two receps in a 2 gang box) with a separate circuit to each one. Definately use GFCI receps instead of breakers.

I'd lobby against a 3 wire home run for obvious (potential for disastor) reasons.
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Old 09-09-2009, 04:35 PM   #12
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Unless someone comes up with a code reason not to, I think the final decision is to run two 12/2 runs to each box, and in each box install two duplex receps. Then in each location we'll have access to each circuit, but none of the receps will be split between two circuits. Thanks All!
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Old 09-09-2009, 05:06 PM   #13
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


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Originally Posted by WaldenL View Post
Unless someone comes up with a code reason not to, I think the final decision is to run two 12/2 runs to each box, and in each box install two duplex receps. Then in each location we'll have access to each circuit, but none of the receps will be split between two circuits. Thanks All!
Not a code reason not too.
Are you coming from the panel with 2 12/2 also?
Put two gfci receptacles in the first box and go from there.
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Old 09-09-2009, 05:25 PM   #14
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


Was planning on coming w/2 12/2 to the first box. Putting GFCI in that box and wiring the rest as downstream from the gfci. Of course, I guess I could run 12/3 from the box to the first outlet and then split it to 2 runs of 12/2 from there. But seems simpler to run an extra 30' of 12/2 and just do them as distinct runs. Makes the box simpler too, as I don't have to tie the breakers together.
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Old 09-10-2009, 05:34 PM   #15
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20Amp Kitchen Split / Dual outlets


So here is an idea that nobody would probably do but do you think the inspector would allow it.

If you were to put the GFI in a different area(i.e in the basement below the kitchen) or use a GFI breaker, then take a 20A Tslot plug and cut both sides for the top and bottom are seperate on the hot and neutral. Then run two 12/2 into the box, one from each GFI, this would give you GFI protection and two seperate circuits in one box.

What do you guys think, would this meet code?

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